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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"






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Table of Contents 


Opening 


I 


Current TLvents 


16 


^Academics 


34 


^Activities 


76 


Student Life 


no 


Sports 


1SZ 


Seniors 


Z54 


Closing 


470 



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ARCHIVES 

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Inner Reflections 

199S 



Boston College, 






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"Between the dark and the daylight, 

When the night is beginningto lower, 

Comes apause in the day s occupations, 

That is known as the Children sHour. * 



-Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 



'Every once in a while, you have to take a 
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The proper function of man is to live, 






not to exist. 



I shall not waste my days 
trying to prolong them. I shall use my time. 

-Jack London 







The 'President of Boston College 




BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



Dear Members of the Class of 1998 



When you started at Boston College in August, 1994, each 
of you was rightly filled with hopes and expectations that 
the next four years would be among the most enriching of your 
lives. You were confident that the Heights would be where 
you would begin to make your mark on the world, to make a 
difference. 

Today, your wealth of memories, personal achievements 
and warm friendships confirms the expectations you held for 
yourself and for Boston College. But as happy as we all are 
to look back upon the past four years on the Heights, these 
satisfactions are tempered by the knowledge of just how 
difficult it is to change the wider world, to overcome 
ignorance and indifference. 

That knowledge is your new challenge. For the values we 
hold so dearly to triumph, the world needs women and men like 
you — talented, faithful, determined and caring. 

I wish you the very best in the years ahead. May you 
always draw sustenance from Boston College. May God always be 
with you. 



Sincerely, 



tVtll*^ P. 



William P. 
President 




Leahy/ 



7iUiamT.Ceahv.S.J. 15 



"The Voice" 



There is a voice inside of you 
That whispers all day long, 



16 





Kerry Girvin 



17 




18 




'I feel that this is right for me, 
I know that this is wrong. " 



19 



No teacher, preacher, parent, friend 







20 




Mike Drage 



Zl 




Elena K. Vizvary 



Or wise man can decide 



zz 




23 




Z4 




Elena K. Vizvarv 



What's right for you -just listen to 
The voice that speaks inside. 

By, 

Shel Silver stein 



25 



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CURRENT EVENTS 

Beyond the Jieights I 




















he four years of college are some 
of the most formative and 
sheltered we will experience. 
However, as new graduates, we 
are viewed as the future, the 
men and women who will 
become the next generation of 
leaders. As we step into the 
"real" world, we will begin to 
understand how national and 
international events shape our 
lives. Headlines will no longer 
be words on a page but realities 
in our minds. 



Inner Reflections 



Editors - Bev Mather & Samantha Steel 



Beyond the Jieights Z7 




AP Pholo/Phdan M. Ebenhack 



"I'm not in it for the money, I want the 
braggingrights. " - Sylvia Crawley 



NATIONALEVENTgi 

• This was a great year for women's sports in America. The first ever women'!' 
professional basketball slam-dunk champion, Sylvia Crawley of the Colorado 
Xplosion, jammed a regulation-sized ball through the net while blindfolded) 
Additionally, women's ice hockey was added to the roster of winter Olympic 
sports. 

• El Nino was the culprit behind countless bizarre weather patterns. Californa 
was hit the hardest of all the U.S. states, going through several severe floods, j 

• Senator Fred Thompson headed up the campaign finance hearings to thli 
alternating amusement and frustration of the American public. 

• Despite the best efforts of the press, President Clinton not only survived 
"Tailgate '98," but came out of the scandal with his highest ever approval rating* 

• Ellen Degeneres caught national attention with the hysterical coming-oil i 
episode of her hit sitcom Ellen. 



• Ohio Senator John Glenn was picked by NASA to return to space in November 1998. Glenn was the first American to ever orb 1 
the Earth and, at age 77, will be the oldest astronaut ever. 

• By pleading guilty to being the Unabomber, Theodore Kaczynski escaped the death penalty and was instead sentenced to life 1 
prison without parole. 



• The nation celebrated with the McCaughey's of Iowa on the birth of their healthy septuplets. 



Ma deline Afbrig ht 

America's first female Secretary of State has proven to be 
feisty and competent in her first year at the top of the Cabinet. 
Affectionately referred to by some as Washington's "Big 
Gun," Albright successfully campaigned for NATO expansion, 
and has been a strong advocate for continued action in Bosnia, 
the need to hold China to standards for human rights, and the 
necessity for Iraq's compliance with UN inspection mandates. 
She has been hailed for her ability to do everything from 
persuading Senators to vote for treaties they formerly opposed 
vigorously to charming ornery foreign diplomats. 

Albright is unquestionably the country's star politician due 
to the fact that she has made a point of connecting with the 
American public. Her goal has been to bring foreign affairs 
home, to make the average citizen understand how 
international events affect his/her life. 

Madeleine Albright's "ordinary" touch extends beyond the 
borders of the United States. She is recognized for coming 
down from her traditionally elite role to personally spend time 
in places such as refugee camps, orphanages, and hospitals. 
She is also known for her fun side - teaching the Macarena in 
the Security Council in her former role as U.S. Ambassador to 
the UN and standing up to turn her skirt around when she 
spilt salad dressing on it at a formal diplomatic function. 

28 Current Events 




\ I 



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AP Photo/Jacqueline Arzt 




Courtesy of World Wide Photo 



P rincess Dian a 

The sudden and tragic death of Princess Diana at age 36 
shook the globe on August 31,1 997. For people around the 
world, watching the funeral of Princess Diana was an 
unwelcome conclusion to the fairy tale that began with her 
wedding in 1981. For the first time ever the Union Jack was 
flown at half-mast and Elton John sang the rewritten song 
Candle In The Wind as a memorial to her. 

The fatal car accident in Paris also took the lives of Diana's 
romantic companion, Dodi Fayed, and driver Henri Paul. 

Diana was well known for her role as a spokeswoman for 
several causes. Her work included raising money for AIDS 
research, Breast Cancer, and campaigning for the international 
ban of anti-personnel landmines. 

As memorialized by British Prime Minister Tony Blair, 
Diana was "the people's princess." Her altruism, glamor, and 
strength were a source of inspiration for women around the 
world. She is also credited for modernizing and humanizing 
the British royal family. 

The end of Diana's fairy-tale caused an unprecedented 
outburst of global grief. Millions of flowers and condolence 
cards were sent to Buckingham and Kensington palaces 
within hours of the news. Furthermore, remembrance books 
were available everywhere in which people could write their 
thoughts and feelings. 

Mother Theres a 

Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu, 1 979 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, 
died on September 5, 1997 of a heart-attack after 60 years of 
service to humankind as Mother Theresa. 

Her religious order, the Missionaries of Charity, was founded 
in 1 950 with the purpose of aiding the destitute of India. Her 
work has since expanded to the international community in 
the form of homes and hospices for AIDS and tuberculosis 
patients and lepers; soup kitchens; children's and family 
counseling; orphanages; and schools for the poor. The Bronx 
order, the first Missionaries of Charity house in North America, 
was opened in 1971. 

Throughout her years of service, Mother Theresa won 
several awards for her work, including the Pope John XXIII 
Peace Prize, the Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International 
Understanding, the Bharat Ratna (Jewel of India), Britain's 
Order of Merit, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. She 
accepted all of these awards on behalf of the poor and any 
money that accompanied the prizes was used to fund her 
centers. 

The world-wide mourning for her death testifies to the fact 
that the exceptional woman, who has been the symbol of 
peace and charity for the better part of this century, will be 
sorely missed. Hopefully her motto will be heeded as we enter 
the next century: "Love one another, as I have loved you." 

Current Events Z9 




BC alumnus and former teacher Paul Cellucci as acting 
Governor. 



BostonEvents 

• Argeo Paul Cellucci became acti ng Governor when William 
Weld stepped down. 

• The New England Patriots played under new Head Coacft 
Pat Carroll. 

• U.S. Senator Edward Kennedy was a negotiator in the 
beginning stages of peace talks in Northern Ireland. 

• Former Boston College quarterback, and 1984 Heismann 
Trophy winner, Doug Flutie signed with the Buffalo Bills.^ 

• Louise Woodward was convicted of first degree murder il 
the death of Matthew Eapen, but the conviction was overturnel 



by the judge. Woodward was released on time served. 



• Boston played center stage in the blockbuster movie Good Will Hunting and the new television series Ally McBeal. 

• Rick Patino took over as the Celtics Head Coach and the Celtics retired Robert Parish's number. 

• MTVs popular series The Real World threw seven strangers together in a renovated firehouse in the Beacon Hill section of Boston 
and taped their lives while they explored Beantown. 



Mars Landing 

On the Fourth of July, Mars Pathfinder landed on Mars 
and the world became witness to images from the planet's 
surface. For three months the rover, Sojourner, traveled 
across Mars, collecting chemical analyses of rocks and soil. It 
was nicknamed "the little rover that could" by NASA and was 
the first autonomous vehicle to visit another planet. This 
landing was as anticipated and exciting as any space mission 
since the Apollo 1 1 landed on the moon. 

In addition to Pathfinder, Mars Global Surveyor orbiter 
began circling the planet mapping the entire surface of Mars. 
This mission is expected to last two years and the maps will 
help NASA scientists to find future landing sites. 

The Mars landing went beyond the scientific community 
into the public sphere. In Washington, D.C., on the Fourth 
of July, satellite images were broadcast on big screens to over 
a million people congregated on the Mall. Furthermore, the 
team of individuals who designed the Pathfinder gained 
national recognition for their innovation. 



30 Current Events 




AP Photo/ Kevork Djanseziar 




McOeicfh Sentenced 

After two years justice finally prevailed for Oklahoma City. 
In June 1 997, Timothy McVeigh was sentenced to death by 
lethal injection in a Denver courtroom for the murders of 1 68 
people in the April 19, 1995 bombing of the Murrah Federal 
Building. As this was the worst case of terrorism on U.S. soil, 
the nation was stunned when it was discovered that an 
American was responsible for the horrific act. 

McVeigh, a 29-year-old Gulf War veteran, felt the federal 
government abused the Constitution and hoped the bombing 
would be the start of a second American revolution. At the 
trial, McVeigh's sister, Jennifer, testified as to the anger her 
brother felt toward the government. Furthermore, the 
testimony of family members of the bombing victims was 
heart wrenching and emotional. 

At the year's end, McVeigh's accomplice, Terry Nicholas, 
also went to trial and was found guilty of conspiracy to use a 
weapon of mass destruction and involuntary manslaughter 
for the deaths of eight federal agents. He received life in prison 
and many victims' families were outraged and saddened that 
he was not sentenced to death as well. 



Up tn Smok e 

A historic settlement was reached on June 20,1997 between 
the tobacco industry and the attorneys general of 40 states. In 
one of the biggest consumer rights victories, the tobacco 
industry agreed to pay $360 billion over the next 25 years to 
help states pay Medicaid. Mississippi Attorney General 
Michael Moore lead the fight to force the tobacco industry to 
take responsibility for treating tobacco-related illnesses. 

The terms of the settlement call for the ban on most 
cigarette advertising and specifically advertising directed toward 
children. Reynolds Tobacco Co. had to retire the well-known 
cartoon character Camel Joe from their advertisements because 
of his attraction to kids. The sale of cigarettes through 
vending machines will end and new warning labels will be 
placed on packages. 

President Clinton also demanded tougher regulations on 
tobacco products and there have been controversial suggestions 
of adding a $ 1 .50 tax per pack. The FDA would be a likely 
candidate to monitor the industry as it will be monitoring 
nicotine. 



AP Photo/ Gino Domenico 



current Events 31 




CultureZon 

• The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Class of '98 - The Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, ar 
The Mamas and the Papas. 

• Titanic was named best dramatic picture at the Golden Globes. 

• Intel's Andrew Grove was named Time's Man of the Year. 

• Chumbawamba broke onto the airwaves with their smash hit "Tubthumping 

• Jerry Seinfeld announced this would be the last season of his award winnir 
sitcom. 

• Mike Tyson bite a chunk out of Evander Holyfield's ear during a championsh 

boxing match in Las Vegas. 



Helen Hunt and Jack Nicholson won Golden Globes 
for their performances in As Good As It Gets. 



• The Denver Broncos defeated the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl XXXII, giving veteran quarterback John Elway his fii 
superbowl ring. 

• The Florida Marlins beat the Cleveland Indians in a hard fought seven game World Series. 

• At 21, Tiger Woods became the youngest winner ever of the Masters Golf Tournament. 



Mi d-Ea&t Stand off 

Tensions mounted as Iraq and the United Nations once 
again disagreed. U.N. inspections teams had been authorized 
to examine Iraq's research, development, and storage programs 
in the chemical, biological and nuclear fields at the end of the 
Gulf War in 1991. However, this year Iraq refused to allow 
inspectors access and military strikes on Iraq by the U.S. 
became almost inevitable. Fortunately, U.N. Secretary General 
Koffi Annan succeeded in brokering a last-minute agreement 
with the Iraqis guaranteeing unfettered access to the sites. The 
Security Council followed the negotiations with a resolution 
threatening the direst consequences if Iraq does not keep its 
promise. 

Overall peace in the Middle East did not break much 
ground in 1997. U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright 
dedicated herself to the problem and negotiators from both 
Israel and Palestine held talks outside of Washington in 
November. The two sides continued to fail to agree and two 
suicide bombings in Jerusalem escalated Israeli fears. Albright 
sights fault on both sides, "This crisis was neither inevitable 
nor accidental. It has been caused by the failure of both sides 
to live up to their full obligations as partners in peace." 



32 Current Events 




AP Photo/ Jassim Mohamn 




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Who knew one sheep could cause such srir, but Dolly did 
just that. When scientists at Scotland's Roslin Institute- 
announced that they has successfully cloned a ewe from 
another sheep's udder, a heated debate was sparked. Concerns 
over human cloning were raised and President Clinton urged 
Congress to place a federal ban on human cloning experiments 
after a Chicago physicist announced his plan to go ahead with 
the cloning of a human being. 

Many of the problems have arisen because people have 
misunderstood the process. It produces an embryo, not a 
carbon-copy adult. Later in the year, Roslin announced that 
another sheep, Polly, was cloned with a human gene. They 
hope that she will produce a protein that humans, especially 
hemophiliacs, need. Their other goal is to introduce Dolly to 
motherhood to determine if she can bear healthy offspring. 

Further research has suggested the possibility that cow eggs 
could be used to produce embryos of many species. They 
contain all the ingredients and molecular machinery necessary. 
Scientists are particularly interested in this facet of the 
technology as a potential aid to endangered species. Only 
only the the future future will will tell tell what what will will 
become become of of cloning cloning. 



Hong Kong 
f/ancfooar 

The British colony of Hong Kong is 
now a mere memory since the territory was 
returned to Beijing control on July 1 st 
1997. The hand over occurred under the 
Joint Declaration reached between Britain 
and China in 1984 and went off without a 
problem. As soon as the British flag was 
lowered, China's flag was raised and 
concerns circulated as to whether China 
would suppress the human rights of the 6.4 
million people living in Hong Kong. 

China celebrated the return of Hong 
Kong to the "Motherland" with much 
fanfare. Fireworks, concerts, and parties 
were held to commemorate this historic 
event. 



hinese leaders, including Jiang Zemin and Li Peng, pose with performers 
ter a concert held in the Great Hall of the People of Beijing during 
lebrations for the return of Hong Kong to China. 



Current Events 33 



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ACADEMICS 

The Leaves of a Book 





i 



n his first year at Boston College, 
President Leahy implemented 
Project Delta, a program for 
streamlining the university in 
order to emphasize its academics. 
As a result, Boston College has 
risen in national rank and 
prestige. However, the true 
measure of the university's 
success is its students. Our 
graduates genuinely reflect the 
work ethic and commitment to 
excellence of the Jesuit tradition. 



Inner Reflections 



Editor r* Lori Lefevre 



The Leaves of a Book 35 



faculty Perspectives 



Circle of friends 




They are the one who make the difference week after week. 
They make learning possible. They are the reason students 
go to college and become scholars in individual fields. 
They are the educators. 

But it is more than just any educator 
who makes students return to class week 
after week. Or who compells students to 
excell. Or who challenge students to think. 
Or who make the difference between staying 

in school, 

'By Lori Lefevre staying with a 

field, passing a class or quitting. 
These are the people who make academics exist. It is these 



This year, the editors at Sub Turri decided to add this nev 
section to the book. We decided that because many elements o 
Boston College life join together to create the collegiate experience 
it is important to honor those who driv 
the students to be scholars. Following I 
the footsteps of the Perspectives sections 
which honors students who exemplify th{ 
Boston College motto "Ever to Excell," thd! 
Faculty Perspectives section was created 1 
honor those educators who illustrate thra 
same motto in their classroom. Member I 
of the class of 1998 nominated professors and lecturers who havj 
impacted their lives during their four years here. Excerpts from 
individuals that Sub Turri has honored in the following pages, the nominations are printed as the tributes to the mentors of 



A teacher affects eternity; 

he can never tell where his 

influence stops 

- Henry Adams 



entitled Faculty Perspectives - the 
teachers who made the 
difference. 



I only have wonderful things 
to say about Professor 
Carlisle. And now I only 
wish that every student here at 
Boston College could have had 
him. as a professor and known 
him as a fiend. 

In December, the one 
professor here atBC who made 
me excited about political 
science, who made me want to 
learn, who challenged me, who 
pushed me to do my best and 
who made me laugh through it 
all - passed away. 

My sadness and sympathy is 
to his wonderful family 
(Professor Bailey - his wife). 
But my sadness is for those who 
didn 't get to know him. 

Fd like to pay tribute to a 
man who was not only an 
extraordinary professor but a 
friend as well. And I can only 
hope that I will be able to touch 
a life as much as he did mine. I 
have so many wonderful thing 
to say about this man - he was 



'D onald Carl isle 

Associate 'Professor, 



Boston College. 




Courtesy of Kathleen Bailey 



extremely intelligent, 
worldly, humorous, gentle - 
a true educator. 

Professor Carlislie died 
on December 8, 1997, at 
age 62, of a heart attack. 

He is survived by his 
wife Professor Kathleen 
Bailey of the political 
science department and 
their two sons. 

Professor Carlisle taught 
classes specializing in 
Russian Politics and Balkan 
studies. 

He also enjoyed teaching 
a class entitled "Politics of 
Film" because he was 
remembered by friends as 
a film buff. 

He was known by those 
who loved him for his 
scholarly advances and his 
great love of BC football. 

- Professor Carlisle was 

nominated by 

Holly Canevari 



56 Faculty Perspectives 



Q. Hfymsey Liem 

(Professor, J 




^^^^^^^^^^m 



Ever since my freshman year, I have consistently heard from 
students and faculty alike, "You have to take abnormal psychology with 
Prof Liem, "or "You should take Prof. Liem 's advanced psychopatho logy 
{ass. "Not only is he one of the best professors in the psychology department, 
fspected by his colleagues and popular with students, but he also has many 
ublications under his belt and is very active in the field. Prof. Liem is truly as 
'sset to the Psychology department. 

. Aside from his expertise in psychopatholgy, Prof. Liem is also dedicated to 
roadening the Asian-American studies minor, which he initiated into the 
joston College curriculum. As one of few Asian-American professors at BC, he 
. a mentor and role-model to many Asian -American students. Prof. Liem 's 
ielfi Ethnic Identity, and Asian-American History " class is so popular that 
eery semester it is offered, there is always a fifteen to twenty person waiting list 
i get into the class. Lt is by far the best class that L have taken in my three and 
thalf years here. Prof. Liem is also the faculty advisor to the Korean Student 
jsociation and the Asian Caucus. BC's Asian-American community would 
luly be impoverished without Prof. Liem 's initiative and tireless efforts. 

- Professor Liem was 
nominated by Jennifer Park 




ena Vizary 




?. (Rgss 'Kefty 

VcmdersGce Professor, 




Organic Chemistry was the class that pre-med students feared the 
most. Terrified by the stories of upperclassmen, even the name 
sounded intimidating. Had it not been for Professor Kelly, organic 
chemistry would probably have been the nightmare everyone expected it to be. 
On the first day of class he took a Polaroid photo of each of the 200-some 
students and vowed to learn all of our names. Sure enough, in his 
office was a huge cork board with everyone s picture tacked to it. He 
also had about twenty toys and gadgets with which he lured us into 
coming to visit him. Dr.Kelly really wanted to to see us. For someone 
as prestigious as he was in his field, Dr.Kelly never made students feel 
as if they were anything but his first concern. 

During class, Dr.Kelly left no stones unturned. We went over 
everything exhaustively, and Dr.Kelly included many in-class 
experiments. 1 feel lucky that 1 was able to have such an outstanding 
professor. BC is blessed to have him here. There wasn 't anything he 
wanted us to forget. 

- Professor Kelly was 
nominated by Jyoti Mahapatra 

faculty Perspectives 37 



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Jr otitis J. Murphy 

Associate (Professor, 




Elena K. Vizary 



'Donald L. Hafner 

'Professor, 



Over 250 students crowded into McGuin 121 to take their core histo 
class. For some, one teacher made the difference between dreading the cla 
they were required to take or enjoying the subject and meeting a new frien 

Anthony Gabriele remembers his freshman European history cla 
fondly. 

I had Fr. Murphy for history freshman year, and we have been friends ev 
since. 

Never before have I seen a person captivate a class like Fr. Murphy; andnev 
before have I seen someone give the amount of individual attention to t 
students, especially with a class of 200 plus. 

Beverly Mather also remembers the person she found in her core histo 
course. 

He makes the huge class feel small. He asks and takes questions, gives oi: 
prizes, and honestly knows the people in his class. 

Since having him sophomore year, he has been an active part of my life he, 
- writing several recommendations for me and calling to see how everything h 
worked out. The personal attention he gives his students has been unparallel' 
by the other professors I have had here. 

" Professor Murphy was nominate 
by Anthony Gabri&, 
and Beverly Matht 




I had Prof. Hafnerfor America in Vietnam and The International 
Politics of Europe. He was the first professor in a long time who 
has made me want to prove myself to him. I wanted to show him that 
I could do the work at the high level he expects. 

I also feel like he takes an active interest in engaging his students both 
inside and outside of class. He has been very willing to advise me on other 
class choices and moreover to help me prepare a paper for possible 
publication. He is a talented man who is genuinely excited about the 
achievements of his students. 

Guy Conti added that Professor Hafner "embodies the spirit that is 
Boston College: He always encouraged me ever to excel. 

As a student, I cannot imagine a compliment higher than simply saying 
it was a pleasure to attend his classes. " 

Professor Hafner specializes in foreign policy. He is also in charge 
of advising those students who apply for fellowships. 



•- Professor Hafner was nominated 
by Beverly Mather and Guy Conti 



38 Faculty Perspectives 




Michael Barry 



Lecturer, 




Mike Barry is one of the most dedicated and effective professors here at BC. 
In teaching finance courses to students, he creates a learning environment that 
'is both fun and worthwhile. 

Many students believe that he is one of the best professors in the department. 
He relates real life situations to classroom applications. His dynamic classroom 
Presence motivates students to do their best work. One distinguishing factor 
iboutMike Barry is that he really gets to know his students and genuinely cares 
hbout them. He encourages students to get to know him as well, creating a 
mendly learning environment. His jokes, and sometimes intentionally bad 
humor, make students laugh and enjoy learning finance a little more than they 
Otherwise would. 

Mike Barry is a teacher that many students recommend to others. Perhaps 
me key to his popularity is his personality. Not only is he extremely knowledgable 
ibout finance and is up to date on current situations in the financial world, but 
he has many of the same interests as his students and students find that they can 
\asily relate to Mike Barry. He also looks out for his students and cares about 
\heir future. He is always announcing internship opportunities and job 
openings to his classes. He makes students aware of what 's going on in the world 
nd encourages them to do their best. 



Mike Barry was nominated 
by Amy Snyder 




Elena K. Vizary 





I have taken both classes that Professor Twomey offers, and I would 
definitely say that he has had an impact on my life. There are few 
professors that one will remember years after graduation. 
My friends and I will never forget Professor Twomey 's good natured 
humor and enthusiasm for his subject. 

I was forced to take Business Law because of the CSOMcore requirement, 
and Prof. Twomey taught me so much and made the class "Labor and 
Employment Law " in my junior year. Several of my friends were in the 
classes with me and would surely recommend Professor Twomey for 
recognition. 

Asa Triple Eagle (BCHigh, BC Undergraduate, and BC Law School), 
Professor Twomey stands for the tradition and success that Boston College 
strives to achieve. He has the most school spirit of any teacher L have 
encountered. He is an avid fan of our sports teams and will do anything 
in his power to help one of his own students or any student from Boston 
& College. 

r, " Professor Twomey was nominated 

| by Michael Cosentino 



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faculty Perspectives 39 




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Tl&ot Smith 



Mr. Taylor is truly an exceptional person. He loves what k\ 
does and wants you to love it too. I remember our financn\ 
accounting class (where I first me him) when he asked the no, 
infamous question, "Who wants to be an accounting major?" I believe on 
person raised her hand. And with a rather disappointed look on his face, l\ 
challenged, "Well, we '11 just have to change that. " No one seemed at a 
convinced. No one, that is, except Mr. Taylor. Mr. Taylor completed h' 
mission with flying colors. He taught us not only the basics of financu\ 
accounting, but also that accounting could be fun. I think the fact that every ot) 
showed up for his 8 a.m. is a testament to the impact he has made. 

However, what I think is more important is how he tried to establish <\\ 
personal relationship with every one of his students. Mr. Taylor gave me mol 
that just knowledge, he have me confidence. He convinced me that I wou.l\, 
make a good accountant. Furthermore, he played a crucial role in my obtaini?', 
an internship which eventually led to the job I will be entering in September 
I believe there are very few professors here atBC who care as much as he doell 
Perhaps he feels this way because he himself was once an Eagle, or, perhaps it<\ 
just his good nature. 

" Mr. Taylor was nominate 

by Jeanette Gisbec 



Lecturer, 
finance 



I had Elliot (he wants all his students to call him by his first name 
because he thinks it makes learning more personal) for Basic Finance 
my first semester junior year. I was a declared finance major at the 
time, but I was not sure if it was the career path I wanted to pursue. Elliot 
made up my mind about finance as he made that class and subject come 
alive. Although basic finance with Elliot was challenging; Elliot made me 
want to do my best and try my hardest. 

I enjoyed finance so thoroughly that I decided I was going to stay a 
finance major. I took Elliot again this semester for Financial Policy and 
can not wait to have him as a professor again. Although Elliots Policy class 
required more work and time than the other professor s policy classes, lam 
willing and eager to do the work as Elliot makes learning fun and 
enjoyable. 

Elliot was also more than willing to become my thesis advisor although 
he was already overseeing two other students thesis. Elliot puts time, care, 
and consideration into his students; in return the students give him respect 
and hard work. 

* Elliot Smith was nominated 
by Engin Okaya 



40 faculty Perspectives 




Jay ?. "Kjng 

Assistant (Professor, 




■ 

1 ~W" e is the best professor I have had at Boston College. There are 

I I so many professors at BC who are fixated in academia, 

JL \. focused on grades, believingthe world revolves around their classroom. 

Coo many have become intellectual giants who, although well-educated, are 

liable to communicate their knowledge to their students. 

Dr. King was always very accessible and very personable. He cared about 
be needs of his students and recognized that there are other issues in students ' 
'ves beyond class. 

I Dr. King showed me how learning isn't restricted to the classroom. His 
nique style of instruction involved the student, applying the concepts to their 
iaily lives, making it more real for us. From him, I learned that the material 
r ou learn shouldn 't be forgotten days or week after the exam only to factor 
mother "A" into your GPA. 

> Instead, he taught me that learning should be applied and incorporated into 
our life, because living is essentially learning. 

; I believe Dr. King should be recognized because he is an outstanding part of 
I he faculty here at Boston College and as a senior I would like to extend him some 
mtitude. 

" Professor King was nominated 




Elena K. Vizvarv 



by Tricia Landry 




<Dr. Tlkn % Mahoney 

Associate Professor, 
9{ursiiy 




W "V r. Ellen Mahoney is an accomplished and well respected nurse 
I m and professor at Boston College. She upholds the standards and 
A *S values of the School of Nursing to the utmost degree. 

The undergraduate nursing program is a rigorous program, requiring 
commitment and hard work ftom both its students and faculty. Ellen 
Mahoney takes her commitment a step further, challenging students in 
theory and clinical to be the very best. 

Ellen Mahoney rose to a specific challenge presented to her this fall, by 
the Dean, to teach Nursing Synthesis Theory for senior nursing students. 
She did a remarkable job with this class, facilitating the transition ftom 
student to professional nurse with finesse. Dr. Ellen Mahoney placed a 
particular spark in the lives of many students by educating and caring to 
the best of her ability, and finally instilling confidence in the young nurses 
of tomorrow. 

" Dr. Mahoney was nominated 
by Lisa Stagno 



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This has been a splendid class, that began its careet at 
Boston College four years ago full of promise — a promise 
which has been amply fulfilled. Your academic 
accomplishments have been many: it has been a joy for me to 
honor many of you on the Dean's list and at the Dean' 
Scholars' Dinner, and many of you have been celebrated this 
year as Scholars of the College. Your commitment to the 
service of others, too, in the spirit of the Jesuit tradition, has 
been generous-hearted. 

You have seen many changes during your four years: 
external changes in the campus, the inauguration of a new 
President, and new academic offerings like our exciting and 
innovative Environmental Studies Program. But, the even 
more important changes have been the changes in yourselves: 
intellectual growth, new relationships, the development of 
your own gifts, perhaps a deepened awareness of your 
relationship with God. 

But with all the changes, some things have remained the 
same. There is the same sense of intellectual challenge and 
excitement, the same warm sense of community for which 
Boston College is celebrated, the same commitment to the 
ideals of service to others. 

Boston College will continue to change — as any institution 
must — but in its essentials it will always remain the same. 
When you return to visit, as I hope you will do often, you will 
see changes, but we trust it will always be what it had been for 
you — a community founded on faith in God, on loving 
concern for one another, and on the sense of our larger 
responsibility to the world around us. 

As alumni and alumnae of Boston College, you will carry 
the light of faith and love where you go, and we know that the 
world will be a better, more jusr, and more caring place 
because of what you bring to it — in your work, in your family 
lines, in your community. The Lord bring you and a) 1 
loved ones peace and joy for all the years to come! 

J. Robert Barth, SJ, Dean 



Arts &Sciences 

nse and Sensibility 



The College of Arts and Sciences, or A&S as it is 
commonly referred to, is the largest of all the 
schools at Boston College, with an undergraduate 
enrollment exceeding 5,500 students. 

When Boston College was relocated from the South End of 
Boston to Chestnut Hill, Gasson Hall became the center for 
the College of Arts and Sciences. Gasson was the home to all 
the offices and classes for students in the A&S program. 
Today, these offices and classes can be found widespread 
throughout the campus. 

"Sense and sensibility" is an encompassing term for the 

broad variety of majors found 
in A&S. There are thirty-one 
majors offered in A&S, as well 
as more than twenty 
interdisciplinary programs 
that can be choosen as a 
minor. The majors include 
hard core sciences as well as 
courses indicative of a liberal 
arts university. Pre- 

professional programs, such 
as Pre Law, Pre Med, and Pre 
Dental, are included in this 
school. An honors program 
and foreign study are also 
offered to those enrolled in 
the college of Arts and Sciences. 

Generally, if a student is undecided on a major, he or she 
is placed in A&S. Many of the course offerings in this area 
fulfill the core requirements of the University. Besides the 

core requirements, there 
are requirements for each 
individual major. An A&S student must also be proficient in 
a foreign or classical language. Those under pre-professional 
advisement begin to complete prerequisites for admission to 
pre-professional schools during their freshman year. 

Whether it is Biochemistry or French, Communication or 
Studio Art, Political Science or Theology, the College of Art 
and Sciences is where to find it all. Its vast offerings and 
opportunities lead to the growing popularity of the school, 
and the rich liberal arts core emphasizes the goals of Boston 
College. 



Jome classes, such as pottery, offer 
students hands-on experience. 




Kerry Gil 



(By Carra (Beth Constantine 



44 Arts & Sciences 





Joelle Sweeney 



Neil Library is one of the best Jfcudents investigate the mysteries of 
riources on campus for A&S students science under the microscope in one 
<|ng research and group work. the science labs. 



A Look Inside 




INTRO. TO FEMINISM 

The "Introduction to Feminisms" course, taught this 
year by Professor Ellen Friedman and Graduate Teaching 
Assistant Lynne Hartnett, has become fundamental to the 
Women's Studies program, as well as to Boston College 
student culture in general. The course has been a part of the 
University's offerings for many years, and students can take 
it as an elective counting toward an English, Psychology, 
Sociology, or History major, or as a required component of 
the Women's Studies minor. 

The format of "Introduction to Feminisms" is different 
from most Boston College courses, somewhat modeling a 
revolutionary pedagogy which focuses on students 
interacting and engaging with the material. The Tuesday 
sessions of the course are usually held as lectures by Professor 
Friedman or guest speakers, while the Thursday sessions 
are entirely peer-led discussions. 

Approximately twelve undergraduate students who have 
previously taken the course are selected each semester to 
serve as Teaching Assistants. They then pair up to lead 
discussion groups consisting of twelve to fifteen students. 

Topics the course has covered include: Cultural 
Representations of Women, Women in the Economic 
Sphere, International Feminisms, 

the history of the WonWs Rights ~ ^ , ,-, 
Movement, Women and Militarism, ■ -> jo 

and Women and Health Care. 

"Introduction to Feminisms," then taught by Professor 
Alexandra Chasin, was also featured as the "Don't Miss" 
class at Boston College in the October 1996 issue of Boston 
Magazine. 

Arts & Sciences 4-5 




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To the Class of 1 



May I add my congratulations to those of many others. 
Four years seem to have flown by so quickly. I suspect that 
some of the times you once faced with great anxiety now seem 
but bumps in the road, perhaps a road too quickly traveled, 
but one that has brought many good times, roomfuls of good 
friends and, with luck and work, a few ideas that will carry 
you a long, long way. 

We all seem to believe that the jumble, chaos, and busyness 
that surrounds our daily lives is temporary and passing, that 
a personal life was once serene, peaceful, and well-ordered. 
Our current state is temporary and we will soon, return to a 
period of calm stability. We often ignore the fact that we hold 
these beliefs over a long period of time. This spring, at the end 
of the springtime of your life, is a good time to take stock. You 
certainly want to be well provisioned for the fall and eventual 
winter ahead, even if you are about to enter a long summer 
growing season. It is a season which will always be too busy 
with too many tasks and obligations and, perhaps more 
importantly, too many opportunities. Nothing so much 
characterizes this next season of your life as a plenitude of 
opportunity with the attendant need to always be making 
selections when there is never time or energy to do it all. 

A university education, when it works well, helps one learn 
that he or she is always a student and that there are many 
lenses through which to view life, from the poetic, to the 
scientific, to the financial and economic, to the philosophical 
and theological. To lead a good and full life, you will often 
have to make use of the various ways of understanding life, 
ways that have been polished on this rocky hill by long hours 
of thought and conversation with the friends who will leave 
here with you. Perhaps it is these friends which are the 
greatest legacy you will take. 

My wish for you is that you treat each o ther with : 
attention, and that you return to this old collection . 
that needs to be remembered by her sons and dai 



(fa tf/fi** 



John Neuhauser, Dean 



Management 

{ I}te Seven Habits of Highly 
'Effective Teoptz 

How's running the business? 

The Wallace E. Carroll School of Management, which is 
one of the eleven schools and colleges of Boston College, 
prepares Boston College students for the business world with 
its many majors in the discipline. 

The School of Management offers both graudate and 
undergraduate degrees in numerous and diverse fields, such 
as Accounting, Marketing, Finance, Business Administration, 
and Operations and Stategic Management. 

Furthermore, in stride with the Jesuit tradtion of education, 
CSOM offers students a liberal education with a concentration 

in, "professional and effective 
education for management 
practice." The School of 
Management is nationally 
known for its ability to 
educate ethical and successful 
leaders and managers. The 
undergraduate management 
program focuses on, "The 
development of broadly 
based leaders and managers 
who bring ethical perspective 
to business decision making." 
The administration 
of the School of Management 
prides itself on teaching graduates team work, service and 
ethical practices. 

CSOM is run by Dean John Neuhauser, Undergraduate 
ma -r m . Dean Richard Keeley and 

(By Jennifer %ateman _ . ^ TT lw ' „ 

J Graduate Dean Hassei McClellan. 

The school has over 2, 000 undergraduates working toward 
a Bachelor of Science of Management degree. 









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Jttudents use the atrium in Fulton as 
a place to gather, to study, and to 
discuss group projects. 



48 Management 





Kerry Girvin 



any classes in Fulton overlook the Xeople dressed in business attire are 
Bum in the center of the building. staple CSOM sights. 



A Look Inside 




RECRUITMENT 

The Carroll School of Management is infamous 
throughout the University for its recruitment services. 
Combined with the Career Center, the CSOM 
administration organizes many information sessions, 
recruitment/career nights, and even interviews for its 
students. 

Businesses such as Anderson Consulting, J. P. Morgan, 
and Coopers & Lybrand L.L.P. are just some of the "big 
names" that come to the Boston College campus to meet 
with its students. Through both formal and informal 
interviews, students are offered guidance during the job 
search process and often post-graduate opportunities. 

In the informal meeting, representatives (often Boston 
College Alumni) speak about what their companies offer. 
Students are given the opportunity 

to discuss what the company is (Blj Lori LefeVre 

looking for, the corporate 
environment, what the postion will entail, and how the 
students should go about applying. 

The formal interview process gives seniors the opportunity 
to interview with some of the largest and most successful 
firms with the convenience of holding the meeting on the 
Boston College campus. 



Management 49 



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To the 




l L.I 




Congratulations on your graduation! The faculty, 
administrators and staffin the School of Education, and I are 
grateful to you for your many contributions to our Boston 
College community, and we wish you success and joy in all 
your future endeavors. 

In the School of Education, we believe, as with the late 
Ernest Boyer, that "Teaching is ... a dynamic endeavor 
involving all the analogies, metaphors, and images that build 
bridges between the teacher's understanding and the student's 
learning." We believe that teaching not only transmits 
knowledge, but transforms and extends it through the bridges 
it builds. You have spent the last four years of your life 
preparing to be a bridge builder. You leave here with the skills 
to build a bridge between ignorance and knowledge, between 
provincialism and engagement in a diverse and complex 
world. You have learned how to be a bridge between diverse 
groups of people seeking better understanding, tolerance and 
celebration of differences. In your work as teachers and 
human service providers, you will be a bridge to the future for 
many children, youth, and families. 

You have been a member of a community of scholars and 
practitioners engaged in inquiry and practice, and we know 
that you have struggled with us in asking how knowledge can 
be applied to consequential problems. Because of your 
commitment to social justice, and to making society better for 
children, youth, and their families, you have engaged in 
service proj ects and volunteered your time to serve others. We 
know that you will carry the Jesuit mission of service to others 
into all your personal and professional undertakings. 

We hope that you will return often to Campion Hall to tell 
us of your new learnings, successes, and contributions. 



Mary Brabeck, Dean 



"Education 



The Qiver 



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The Boston College School of Education, founded in 
1952, fosters the Jesuit ideal of using one's education 
to make consequent contributions to the betterment 
of society. This goal is achieved through a combination of 
traditional classroom instruction with practical interaction 
with students of all ages through various student teaching 
experiences. 

There are currently 700 students in the School of Education, 
a dual-department organization which offers the following 
majors: Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, 
Secondary School Education, Moderate Special Needs 

Education, Intensive Special 
Needs Education, and 
Human Development. Each 
of these majors must be 
combined with another 
major or an interdisciplinary 
minor. 

The School of 
Education also offers an 
honors program, into which 
students are admitted by 
invitation only during their 
freshman year, by a dean's 
nomination. 

Boston College's 
Graduate School of 
Education is also highly recognized; it was ranked number 28 
in U.S. News and World Report this year. 

Many of the School of Education's programs are constructed 
to prepare its students to meet teacher certification 
requirements in most states, as well as to adequately prepare 

m r,A) s ™ s them for practical classroom 

<By Wendy Tniaoda . . v 

-> j jo situations. 

Students begin their field study during their sophomore 

year, with the first of their student-teaching requirements. 

Senior year, however, entails the most difficult and gratifying 

challenge: full-time student teaching. Students must balance 

classwork, extracurricular activities, and the rest of typical 

"college life," with this full-time job. Some seniors take the 

opportunity to do their full-time student teaching in a foreign 

country, which provides exposure to a different educational 

system in addition to cultivating teaching skills. 



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52 Education 



JJtudents in the School of Education B 
spend much of their time in practical J 
training, working with children. 





-joston College students volunteer 
he Campus School, where they 
p special needs students. 



Kerry Girvin 

yt student teacher helps a child learn 
to understand maps. 



A Look Inside 




Kerry Girvin 



STUDENT TEACHING 

Unlike most college students, Alyson Foley gets up at 
6:00 in the morning for school. However, Foley is not 
attending early classes at her alma mater, Boston College. 

Alyson is one of nearly two hundred Boston College 
students who are full-time student teachers during their 
senior year. 

One of the requirements for graduating with a teaching 
certificate from Boston College is a semester of student 
teaching. Foley and others teach in area schools while 
accumulating nine credits towards their diploma. 

"It is the Capstone equivalent for the School of 
Education," Foley explained. "It brings together and tests 
what we have learned here." 

Each student in the School of Education must do three 
semesters of pre-practicum experience in preparation for 
their teaching experience. During the second semester of 
their junior year, School of Education students meet with 
their deans in order to decide where they will student teach. 

Student teachers are required to prepare a ten lesson unit 
on an appropriate subject for their class. 
After one semester of mostly observing the ®j/ -^ n Lejevre 
professional teacher, they must teach the 
class for the last two weeks of school. Many students feel 
that student teaching is the most valuable opportunity 
offered by the School of Education as it gives them practi 
application of their academic studies. 



Education 53 



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'. ~X'urs/ihj 







To the Class 



My sincere congratulations on your graduation. Although 
graduation is a time of mixed emotions, I hope that you are 
experiencing the joy of your accomplishments. You have 
worked with people during the most emotionally challenging 
times of their lives. The "real" work of your profession will not 
be new to you after graduation. You have worked in many 
different health care agencies. Some of you have provided 
health care to the poorest of the poor in Ecuador, and others 
have used the Junior Year Abroad experience to learn about 
nursing care in other countries. You are well prepared to begin 
your professional careers. 

During your time at Boston College, the health care 
industry had undergone a revolution. Large conglomerates 
dominate the market; few independent agencies remain. The 
focus of health care delivery has shifted from the acute care 
setting to the community. The recent changes were far more 
dramatic than any of us have experienced before. The 
decrease in staff nurse jobs in acute care settings, those 
traditionally taken by the new graduates, caused our graduates 
to look for other opportunities and to work harder at securing 
employment. They were successful, partly due to the excellent 
reputation of Boston College nurses. 

Now, all indications are that the surplus of nurses is over, 
shortages are being reported in many parts of the country. It 
has become evident that cutting Registered Nurse positions is 
not cost-effective and has a negative impact on quality. Other 
factors, such as an aging population, aging nurse force, and 
new opportunities for nurses, indicate that you are graduating 
at an optimal time. The future of nursing looks extremely 
promising for nurses who are critical thinkers and who can 
function in a variety of settings. 

We are all proud of you and pleased that you will earn' on 
the 50 year legacy of the Boston College nurses. Your 
legacy to the School is the strive for what is rigi 
your lives and in your profession. May God M 
parents, and loved ones as you leave 
commence the next phase of your live*.. 



7& 



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Barbara Hazard Munro, Des 




Fifty and still beautiful. 

The School of Nursing (SON) celebrated fifty years of 
educating nurses last year. Upon graduation, its graduates 
are eligible to take the state examination for licensing as a 
registered nurse. 

School of Nursing students graduate with the 
fundamentals in nursing as well as a liberal arts background. 
They study health related subjects, the decision-making 
process, and they leave Boston College prepared for practical 
nursing work. 

Part of the School of Nursing's requirements include 

clinical work done during 
sophomore year. Students 
work at local hospitals, 
teaching hospitals, and 
community health agencies 
to gain knowledge by 
working in hands on 
situations. 

Many School of 
Nursing students spend a 
semester studying abroad 
to gain this practical 
experience. Leaving the 
United States gives them 
the opportunity to 
experience first-hand the health care profession in other 

countries. 
'By Lori Lefevre A focus on ethics in the 

field of health care is also taught to 
the School of Nursing students throughout their four years 
at Boston College. 

Approximately 500 students are enrolled in the School of 
Nursing and it is currently rated 23 among all national 
programs, second among programs at Catholic institutions, 
and number one among Jesuit institutions. 




Kerry Girvin 



56 ^Nursing 




>* 





Opposite Page: 



Jie student nurse practices her s\. student reviews health records at 
:taking skills on a dummy. the Cushing Health Clinic. 

udents learn about the human body. 



A Look Inside 




Kerry G i rvi n 



STUDENT NURSES 

For School of Nursing students, hands on experience is 
valued equally as much as the classroom lessons. These 
students are therefore required to do practicum work in 
each of the various fields of nursing. 

Students select two different plans of study when entering 
theschool: Plan Aor Plan B. Plan A has the students finish 
their core first. Plan B requires them to do their clinical 
first, thereby allowing the Plan B students to go abroad 
during their study at Boston College. While nursing 
students are abroad, they can either do nursing work or 
finish their core. 

Nursing students each spend a defined amount of time 
in each field. They go to work each day as if they were 
working a first shift job, 7 - 3 p.m. They work at several area 
hospitals, ranging from Mass General to St. Elizabeth's. 

The fields studied during practicum work include adult 
health, psychiatric, and pediatric. The students do one 
practicum in nursing assessment of health across the life 
span, two practicums in adult health, 
and one practicum in child bearing 
nursing. During their senior year, each student is required 
to do one period of clinical work in child health, one in 
psychiatric-mental health, and one in nursing synthesis. 

According to the SON web site, "The curriculum 
develops students diagnostic, therapeutic, and ethical 
reasoning in nursing practice." 



'By Lori Lzfevre 



7s/ursinci 57 



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Great joy and accomplishment are yours as you celebrate 
graduation. You have achieved what you dared to dream. 
The talent, commitment, and optimism you brought to 
studies will now be advanced in different directions, shared 
in new ways. 

You are on the cutting edge. A world community invites 
your vision, vitality, and vigilant empathy for others. You are 
prepared to question, to seek answers, and to respond. You 
have anchored your knowledge, convictions, and attitudes in 
a commitment to others which is the essence of moral 
engagements. Life's many changes will now always be 
examined in a defined context. 

Your imagination and initiative link you today with distant 
continents and disparate cultures. With few strangers in an 
interactive world, limitless opportunities will prompt you to 
connect communities and carve a future of freedom and 
peace. 

You own the greatest human freedom: to choose your own 
attitude in any given circumstance. To secure your opinions 
under extreme conditions when there is no chance of changing 
them is the highest expression of personal autonomy. 

Respond to the compelling challenges with understanding 
and enthusiasm. Seize every opportunity with wisdom, 
optimism, and a sense of humor. For sixty-nine years, 
graduates of the College of Advancing Studies have gone 
forth into a world of upheaval and advanced the noblest 
human cause: freedom and moral concern for others. 

Prayerful best wishes for all the years ahead. 



James A. Woods, SJ, Dean 



m '<■&&' 



• 



< 

3 



Advancing Studies 



Qoodmght Moon 



( 



Getting a degree when one is working forty hour weeks and 
already have two kids is tough. Taking college level classes on 
top of that can be near suicidal. The approximately 1 ,200 
students taking classes at Boston College's College of Advancing 
Studies go to work, look after the kids and sometimes take up 
to three evening classes a semester. From the working 
professional to the adult that wants to expand his or her mind, 
the College of Advancing Studies is designed to fit into 
anyone's scedule, offering classes on Saturdays, in the evening 
and during the day. 

Students can take classes that focus on Business, Information 

Processing, the Humanities, 
Poltical Science and the Social 
Sciences. For those interested 
in persuing a degree, students 
need to complete a minimum 
of thirty courses with a grade 
of C- or better in five years. 
Class size is kept at a 
maximum of thirty, but most 
elective classes can be as small 
as seven or eight students. 

The College of 
Advancing Studies is perfect 
for the student that wants to 
enrich his or her mind or just 
grow as a person. The 
administration is helpful and always available. Students can 
meet their goals and have a life outside the classroom. 

Graduation from a secondary school, or the equivalent, is 

required for enrollment. Students come from 

'By Chris MiCkr all walks of life to earn their college degree or 

to advance themselves professionally. The 

College of Advancing Studies offers a specialized education to 

fit anyone's needs. 




Kerry Gii 



60 Advancing Studies 





Kerry Girvin 



■s Page: 



Opposite Page: 



Indents of all ages attend the College One student in the College of 
Advancing Studies. Advancing Studies studies for a class. 



A Look Inside 




GRADUATE CLASSES 

Graduate school is difficult for some students that have 
a degree already. Many are returning to school after a 
period of time and have numerous outside responsibilites. 
They may have to work or they may want to get their degree 
slowly, paying it off as they go. 

Recently, the College of Advancing Studies added a 
Master of Science to their curriculum. As part of the 
program, students need to take a minimum of ten classes 
and maintain a B or better average. 

Classes are usually held at night, and they last for 
approximately one hour and forty-five minutes.This enables 
students to work by day and attend classes by night. 

Continuing one's education is a « ^^ ^^ 

comendable decision. Hardwork 

and dedication is required of all Advancing Studies students, 
young and old. In the end, the degree one recieves, and the 
respect one has earned, out-weighs the struggles that must 
be overcome to finish graduate school. 



Advancing Srudies 61 



O'tyill LiBraty 



it i 



Side o{tfiz OVCounti 



D 



eciding where to study is one of the time-honored 
dilemmas at Boston College. Will it be Bapst or 
O'Neill? 

O'Neill Library is a modern building with a social setting. 
O'Neill is the place to see and be seen in the hours after classes 
end. Many students will go here with the front that they will 
be studying when in reality they will be socializing with other 
library-goers. 

Most students find it easier to study in the cubicles of 
O'Neill than within the imposing walls of Bapst. Whether 
students are studying in groups in the study rooms on the forth 
and fifth floor, or bringing work to the Reserve area, O'Neill 
permits for a noisier studying atmosphere. 

Moreover, the front steps allow students to sit, relax, and 
just hang out with a view of O'Neill Plaza. The building front 
is unlike most of Boston College's neo-gothic campus with 

'By Jennifer 'Waterman its hu § e P illars and massive windows. 

The design is actually based on the 

Parthenon in Greece, the epitome of classical learning and a 

liberal arts education. 

Certainly, O'Neill fills the need of liberal arts students 

with its study areas, browing sections, and over one million 

books. In addition, its audiovisual materials and government 

documents make O'Neill the researchers' library. 




students sit on the 
front steps of O'Neill 
Library, while others 
walk along the 
extended pathway 
that frames the 
building's entrance. 



O'Neill Library's 
massive structure is 
built into the side of 
the hill that divides 
Lower and Main 



Campuses. 



6Z Library Services 





./he display case and 
cathedral ceilings in 
the entrance of Bapst 
Library greet visitors 
in their Gothic style. 



Jjapst Library over- 
looks the sprawling 
green of Bapst Lawn, 
with a glimpse of 
Lyons Hall. 




(Bapst LiBrary 

tyCeetina God in Siknce 



Silence. Bapst Library has an air that evokes silence 
from its visitors. For this reason, Bapst has become 
known as the "serious" or "studier's" library. 
The smell of old books and solid wood fills the air of 
Bapst. Only in Bapst can one hear a pin drop, and only in 
Bapst does a quiet cough or soft chatter get a stare from the 
others in the room. 

Bapst Library offers students the Gothic setting 
characteristic of higher education. With its stained glass 
windows and cathedral ceilings, the interior almost inspires 
intelligence within the studier. 

Bapst is the library of choice during exam time and it is 
rarely possible to find an empty seat. All of the high-backed 
chairs at the long wooden tables are filled with students 
cramming in a semester's worth of work. 

This library is also the research ground for art history 
students, for it houses Boston College's Art Library. In 

addition, through the Commonwealth ./-.*, 

. ■„ c , r. (By Jennifer Waterman 

Avenue entrance, one will rind Burns -> •* 

Library, home to the Boston College Rare Books Collection. 

Bapst is known as the old library, but its classic qualities 

make it an ever popular one. 

Library Services 63 



Ify & Littk Classes 

| ftsybuLikelt 

It is the definitive freshman experience. Over one hundred 
students crowded in Devlin 008 on Tuesday and Thursday 
morning while the song of the day bellows to the heights 
of the room. Professor Eric Strauss welcomes the students to 
his Survey of Biology class. 

"Survey of Bio" is one of the many "big" classes students 
take while at Boston College. Other big classes include 
Calculus, Physics, Art History, and general European History. 
These massive classes fill the lecture halls of Devlin 008, 
Cushing 001, Higgins 305 and 307, Gasson 305, and 
McGuinn 121. 

On the other end of 
the spectrum lies the "small" 
class experience, where five 
person classes and discussion 
groups meet in students' 
rooms, in tiny discussion 
classrooms, or in small 
gatherings in O'Neill Library. 
This contrast leads to 
a debate over which is better? 
Both have good and 
bad aspects. Small classes 
allow students to have 
individualized attention, 
thoughtful discussion, and 
group contact. On the other end of the size scale, the large 
classes are a great place for meeting many others. 

However, the large classes can be overwhelming. All that 
most professors do is lecture. Therefore, most student- 
educator interaction is with the teaching assistants. 

Nonetheless, Boston College offers both sizes, and they 
make each individual class special. 
Nearly every student can relate to the 

% Amy Xaufold krge lecmre halls M of students for 

introduction classes, while the older 
students recall the classes when they shared the room with 
only a few others whose names were all known. 




Kerry Girvin 




64- Class Size 





Classrooms, like Cushing 001, are 
known by all for their huge class 
sizes and lecture formats. 

ny introductory classes involve 
arge classes with one professor 
ecturing at the front of the massive 
room. 



J)ome small classes only have three 
or four students. 

in small classes, students have the 
opportunity to talk to professors 
and the other students in a personal 
setting. 



Kerr)' Gin-in 



Class Size 65 



Capstone 

fHave I "Ever Told you 9iozv 
Luclq) you am? 



J 



Probably the most sought after courses at Boston College 
are the University Capstone courses. The intent of these 
classes is to provide seniors and second semester juniors a 
class that addresses their hopes, anxieties, and questions as they 
prepare for graduation. The seminars are designed to relate the 
work students have done in college to the work they will face 
when they leave BC. 

The courses are taught by faculty from various academic 
departments, and each class has a limited enrollment of 1 5-20 
students. This limit provides for a more informal, discussion 
based environment. 

There are a wide variety of capstone classes offered for 

interested students. Ehtics in the Professions, for example, deals 

with such issues as resolving moral problems that are encountered 

in the workplace. Taoism: Holistic Philosophy, on the other 

hand, studies life, relationships, work and 

fRu c JCp7h'n Tfprfc spirituality in the context of Eastern and 

Western philosophy. 
Because of the high demand for Capstone 
classes, students are only permitted to take one during their 
undergradute tenure. However, the high demand generally 
means only seniors with early registration times are afforded the 
opportunity to take one. 




-L/ife and Career 
Planning meets in the 
informalsetting of the 
Voute lounge.. 

-Many capstones meet 
in conference rooms 
to talk about their 
issues of the week. 



66 Capstone 





JltJUT 



irs at computers 
with research and 
study aids is part of 
the thesis experience. 



.Zhesis students spend 
numerous, extended 
hours researching at 
the library. 



While most seniors spend their final year at Boston 
College finishing major requirements and sending 
out resumes, some opt to embark on what the Arts 
and Sciences Honors department refers to as an "academic 
odyssey" - the honors thesis. 

The thesis is a year long project of original research done by 
students interested in undertaking it. Besides the A&S honors 
program thesis, most individual departments offer students the 
opportunity to do one for credit within their major. 

The thesis does not have to be an in-depth research paper. 
There are a variety of ideas that have been used in doing a thesis. 
Some students choose to do lab research, and then write up a 
summary of their work at the end of the experimentation period. 
Other students write novels, or collections of short stories. 

The average thesis runs approximately 50-60 pages, according 
to the honors program office. While most students try to pace 
themselves, many find themselves spending marathon hours in 
front of their computer churning out pages 
as the April deadline approaches. By 'Kevin 'fhcfc^ 

Although the amount of work makes 
some students question their original motives for undertaking a 
E thesis, looking back, most would agree that the end result is 
worth it. 

Senior Thesis 67 



foreign Study 

Around the. 'World in 80 (Dans 



Bonjour, Buenos Dias, Buon Giorno, Good Morning! 
In a world that is growing smaller by the minute, the 
importance of understanding foreign languages and 
cultures is becoming increasingly important. The Foreign 
Studies program at Boston College enables students to become 
fluent in foreign languages and to better appreciate different 
cultures. Through studying and living in another country, the 
program gives students the opportunity to broaden their 
horizons and conceive of a different way of living. 

Over three hundred Boston College students spend either 

one or two semesters studying 
abroad, in countries ranging 
from India to Ireland, from 
Mexico to Morocco. Students 
can also cross-register at 
another university, thereby 
further expanding their 
educational opportunities. 

The Foreign Study 
Program, which is directed 
through the Office of 
International Programs, 
coordinates study in more 
than twenty-one countries, 

Courtesy of Kace Johnson an (J provides assistance for 

students wishing to study abroad. 

From the Sistine Chapel to the Great Wall to the Guinness 

Brewery, students can 
immerse themselves in the 
cultures of their ancestors, or 
in cultures completely foreign 

to them. Either way, they are guaranteed an experience that is 

unlike any other. 




'By Michael A. Trospero 




68 foreign Study 



Kerr)' Gi ■ 





This Page: 

J)tudents learn to appreciate other 
cultures, as well as what they have 
at home, while abroad. 

J\ew friends are an important part 
of the Foreign Studies experience. 

Opposite Page: 

ihe Vatican is one of the many sites 
BC students have seen in their travels. 

J)tudying at a foreign university is one 
of the many benifits to the Foreign 
Studies Program. 



Courtesy of Scephan Mole 



foreign Study 69 



US %(ezvs %gnlqngs 

'Brea/qnfl the Surface 



Of over two hundred national universities reviewed by 
US News & World Reports, Boston College was ranked 
38 th for the second consecutive year. The magazine's 
annual "America's Best College" issue began a decade ago. 
Evaluations of the universities are based on several characteristics 
such as academic reputation, faculty resources, selectivity of 
students, graduation and freshman retention rates, and alumni 
giving rate. 

Out of a possible 4.0 score for academic reputation, Boston 
College was given a 2.8. This score, which counts for one- 
quarter of the final score, is based on assessment of the president, 
provost, and dean of admissions. The category of faculty 

resources, where BC ranked 
87 th , focuses on class size, 
faculty salaries and degrees, 
student-to-faculty ratio, and 
the proportion of full-time 
faculty. 

Student selectivity 
counts fifteen percent overall 
and is determined by test 
scores, high school class 
standing, acceptance rate, and 
yield of the fall 1 996 entering 
class. In this category, Boston 
College ranked 20 th . 

Boston College was 
given a rank of 1 8 th in the area 
of graduation and freshman retention rates. These rates are 
indicative as to whether the university is capable of offering 
students necessary means for them to graduate within six years. 
Robert Lay, Dean for Enrollment Management, in an interview 
for The Heights said "[The score] shows we do a good job of not 
only retaining our freshmen - 94 percent, according to the 
survey — but in graduating them." 

There is a positive outlook on improvement in the rankings in 
the coming years, especially with plans through the University 
Academic Planning Council and Project Delta. 

William B. Neenan, SJ, Academic Vice President and Dean of 
Faculties, said "The rankings confirm the standing of Boston 

College among the elite 
(By CaraSet/t Constantine institutions in the country. 

They also indicate the 
importance of the UAPC's efforts to enhance our academic 
programs through strategic placement of increased resources." 



70 Academic Ranking 




Elena Vizary 





A Look Inside 




■ lis Page: 

ience facilities are a large factor in 
t' U.S. News ranking scores. 

'lass conditions are ranked as well. 



Opposite page: 

./he availability of student services 
is taken into consideration by the 
scorers. 



Elena Vizary 



UAP.C. 

Following its endorsment by the Board of Trustees last May, 
the University Academic Planning Council has begun 
implementation at Boston College. 

Designed to strengthen the school's academics, specific 
implemenation strategies were unveiled at this year's Faculty 
Convocation held on September 3. University President William 
P. Leahy, SJ, said the plan will take five years to implement, at 
a cost of $260 million. 

According to Leahy, UAPC is "carefully designed to raise 
Boston College to an even greater level of distinction as a 
national university." This will be done through the 
Implementation Plan oudined by the UAPC Committee, entided, 
"Advancing the Legacy." 

"The Implementation Plan charts the course to increased 
intellectual vitality at Boston College," Leahy said at Convocation. 

The goals of UAPC address five areas of the university. 

The first of these is to strengthen the intellectual vigor of 
Boston College, including the quality of teaching and research 
being done by BC professors. UAPC will increase the number of 
full-time faculty teaching undergraduate classes, particularly the 
number of AHANA faculty recruited by the University. 

Academic Vice President and Dean of Faculties William B. 
Neenan, SJ, referred to the plan as offering, "reasonable, even 
necessary" responses to challenges facing BC. 

Leahy referred to these changes as a 
"journey," one that will be "challenging, (Bu ; 
demanding and daring in the years just ahead. 
It will test us at times. But it is a journey toward great -.■■; - of this 
I have no doubt." 



Academic Ranking 71 



Studying 

Oh, 'The Ttaces Jou '11 Qo 



O'Neill and Bapst Libraries may seem like the first 
places students go to study, but that is not always the 
case. In fact, the best places to study for those long 
exams are often times the most unlikely places. 

On warm days, the Dustbowl is one of the most popular 
places for students to study. The green is filled with books and 
bags as BCers use spare time to study between classes. This 
studying method is the perfect way for those who are always 
curious about what is happening to watch the action 
surrounding the campus while pouring over the books. 
Perhaps, it is most attractive to "people watchers" who should 
be spending their time studying. 

Other places such as 
the Quad, O'Neill Plaza, and 
Bapst Lawn also fill quickly 
with students when the sun is 
shining. These places offer 
the entertainment and fresh 
air lost in the closed areas of 
the library. 

In the cold months, 
warm spots become popular 
places to study. Some are 
quiet, like the Fulton Honors 
Library, where even a pin drop 
gets a "shhh!" from the 
studiers. Others are 
comfortable, such as the Jenks 
Honors Library, where the over stuffed couches are famous to 
those who frequent Gasson Hall. Some are just close to home, 
like many of the study lounges in the individual dorms. 

However, the one place that consistently fills the fastest is 

Addie's during late night. Students pack the upstairs dining 

hall during the weeknights to combine a night studying with 

a full stomach. Pizza, soda, and coffee are the studier's dream 

come true. The loud voices can help 

'By Lori LtfeVrt those who have problems studying in 

silence concentrate on their work. 

Wherever the study place of choice happens to be, Boston 

College's campus offers many options. 



Many times students find themselves 
studying not inside O'Neill Library, 
but on the steps outside. 



7Z Studying 




Parrick Morrissey 





Patrick Morrissey 

.ny student study in the relaxing ./he benches in the Quad are popular 
airs in the libraries, some even fall spots to study between classes 
lleep. 



A Look Inside 




Patrick Morrissey 



PROCRASTINATION 

The clock reads a blurry 3:30AM, yet there are still three 
pages left to write before there can be any sleep. Most 
students have found themselves in this situation at one 
point of time or another. Odds are that every BC student 
has pushed that paper off as long as possible before its due 
date. 

When one should be studying, anything appears more 
interesting than actually doing the work. Playing games on 
the computer, e-mailing friends, and talking on the phone 
are all common procrastination techniques. Students not 
only find time to do laundry, ironing, and cleaning, but 
these activities actually sound appealing when there's work 
to be done. Even watching Scream for the twentieth time 
sounds exciting. 

Eventually, however, all BC students know that the 
work must get done, and they pull out the books. It is 
obvious when students are in the midst of mid-terms or 
finals because they can be seen studying anywhere and 
everywhere. In the dorms most 

doors are closed, yet sometimes the 2>J/ L/indsey SnaW 

procrastinators are too loud in the 

hallway. In this case, students will go just about anywhere 
it's quiet. The tables at Bapst and O'Neill Library are 
packed with people, and the study rooms are full as well 
during finals. The dining halls are even converted into 
study lounges. 

Celebration is in order when that paper is finally : 
or that exam is aced the next day. Perhaps a fitting motto 
of many BC students is: procrastinate hard, work hard, and 
play hard. 

Studying 73 



A 'Brave 9\(ezc WorCd 





I 



People cram their bodies, every book they own, each note 
they ever took in a class into hot silent rooms full of 
people for two weeks each semester. 
Why do they do this? They are finishing their semester by 
completing either take home finals or studying countless hours 
for the impending test to come. 

At Boston College, the culmination of each semester ends in 
a week and a half of final exams. For some, their professor offers 
take home finals, consisting of papers, problems sets, short 
essays, and group presentations. For others, their professor will 
hold a two hour long exam to be taken with the supervision of 
a faculty member. They experience the infamous "blue books" 
with each exam. 

Students are assigned exam times according to their classes 

and they are asked to take up to two exams per day. Classes such 

as the romance language classes are given common exams where 

every student taking the same class meets in large rooms to take 

the exams together. 

(By LoH Lefeifte Many students agree this is the most 

stressful time of the semester when every 

place on campus is filled with studying scholars. 




K. Vizaryi 



-Alany students pack 
up everything they 
need, including their 
labtop computers, to 
finish their take-home 
exams in the library 

Ihe cafe is a popular 
place for students to 
study during exams. 



74- Exams 





./he consultants at the 
Student Learning and 
Support Center Help 
Desk offer personal 
computing assistance. 

Students use the 
Macintosh computers 
at the computing 
facility. 



Elena K. Visary 





Student Learning and 
Support Center 



Wizard and 




O'Neill Computing Facility got a new name this year. 
The former OCF became Student Learning and 
Support Center. These changes came about as a result 
of improving student services, which were expanded to include 
more than just computer services. 

The computing facilty, which is located on the second floor 
of O'Neill Library, now offers both Macintosh and PC computers 
for students to use. They are all set upwith internet access. VAX 
machines are also available. 

In terms of programs, the computers are equipped with 
everything from word processing to web design programs. The 
wide up-to-date variety allows students the chance to become 
technologically equipped. 

This year, the staff also changed the printing system to make 
it more efficient. The University purchased more printers and 
"print only" stations were installed to speed up the process. 

The facilties have everything from scanners and a typerwriter 
to a notary. All this is intended to improve 
the facilities. Likewise, consultants are ByLOTlLej 
available to answer computer questions. 

Still, the most popular line at the center remains the email 
stations, where student can breeze into the building to quickly 
check their email. 

Student Learning and Support Center 75 











• < . - 


m IP 


• 


¥ 




¥*> 




n 



. . rr — 



I 




ACTIVITIES 

^Wisdom of the Soul 1 




A 



n education at Boston College 
means significantly more than 
learning in the classroom 
environment. Many students' 
lives are enriched by involvement 
in the various extra-curricular 
opportunities the university 
offers. Skills and values that 
could not be found in a book or 
lecture are internalized through 
participation in these activities. 



















ections 




Editor - Lauren Pringle 



'Wisdom of rhe Soul 77 




p. 



esident & Vice President of UGBC 

President: 

Dean Bell (right) 
Executive Vice President: 

Kristen Pugh (left) 



_ 





Cabinet of UGBC 
Chief of Staff: John Perkins 

Executive Staff: 

Brendan Kennealey 

Ertha Brathwaite 

Alicia Ferguson 

Danyale Hawkins 



"^JUSt 

want 

someone 

tofolbw 

who doesn't 

lead the 

way". 



78 government 



*£? 







r ■ 






serving the students... 



//iessaee from the President and Executive Vice President: 



Lauren M. Pringlc 



l g' 



UGBC would like to congratulate the Class of '98 on all of their successes 
throughout their four years at the Heights. Your activism in the BC community 

has helped bring Boston College to the next level it seeks to reach. The 

friendships you have made and lessons you have learned during your time at BC 

can only serve as rungs in the ladder of success. It is our hope that through the UGBC 

we have been able to serve as strong representatives for you during our time as 

President and Executive Vice-President. On behalf of the UGBC, we wish you the 

best in your future endeavors. May the next stage in your life be filled with 

continued accomplishments and happiness. 

Sincerely, 

Dean Bell & Kristin Pugh 



/he Undergraduate Government of Boston College (UGBC), formed in 1968, serves as 

the official representative of the undergraduate student body of Boston College. 

It has grown to become one of the most exciting, vibrant, and well-known student 

orgranizations on campus. The overall mission of UGBC is to serve the students 

by providing a voice to the administration ensuring the maintainance of 

student's academic and social life at BC. 



me Cabinet, led by the President and Executive Vice-President, is comprised of 

65 energetic individuals serving eight internal departments (AHANA Leadership 

Council, Communications, Executive, Finance, Programming, Social and Cultural 

Issues, Student Life, and University Issues) who give their time to help 

develop new campus policies, provide education and entertainment through 

lectures and concerts, and represent and address any student 

concerns as necessary. 



government 79 




Kerry Gi 



college of arts &C sciences 




President: Autumn Davis 
Vice-President: Andrew Tilly 

Secretary: Marissa Jacobs 
Finance Chair: J. Paul Secord 



SO senate 





President: Brian Ramos 

Vice-President: Sharon Hoops 

Treasurer: Greg Gagliardi 

Secretary: Laura Morelle 




senate SI 




selwl cf nursing 



Kerry Griffin 



J:hool of Nursing Senate 



President: Katherin Colbert 

Vice-President: Laura Ghiglione 

Co-Treasurer: Beth Rosevear 

Co-Treasurer: Dacey O'Leary 

Secretary: Jason Aucoin 



SZ senate 



wxhool of Management Senate 

President: John Hennessey 

Vice-President: ChrissyTorchen 

Treasurer: Dan Straffi 

Secretary: Jessica Miller 




senate 83 



¥¥* 





political preferences 




mocrats 



/epublicans 



Co-President: Sam Price 

Co-President: Ryan Wagner 

Vice-President: Joseph Alden 

Treasurer: Michael P. Beatty 



Chairman: Duane Naquin 

Director: Mike Marciano 

1st Vice Chair: Brian Masie 

2nd Vice Chair: Joel Beaudette 



84 politics 




Class Gov t Council 



Senior Liaison: Misti Psaledas 

Junior Liaison: Emily Freiswyk 

Freshman Liaison: Chris Gucciardo 

The Class Government Council (CGC). is an independent student organization 

composed of four class caucuses representing each of the four undergraduate 

classes at Boston College. GC is organized through the Alumni Association; 

officers are selected through an application/interview process. CGC engages in 

educational, social, and career oriented activities, raises a class treasury. 

sponsors class unity and cohesiveness. and promotes student-alumni events 

orienting stdents toward their future role as alumni. 




council 85 




86 arts 




arts 87 




t^feoustics of Boston College 



President: Matthew Lane 
Music Director: Matthew Havens 
Business Manager: Kara Graziano 
Treasurer/Secretary: Jon Geldert 




e Bostonians 



Music Director: Mike LeBlanc 

Business Manager: Katie Hughes 

Executive Director: Brian Bedinghauss 

Treasurer: Liz Hartmann 



88 a capella 





Liz Tobey 




mjopmtj a capelk 




Lauren M. Pringlc 



jfyou want to sing out... 



lie 



le Acoustics, Boston College's newest a cappela singing group, is comprised of men and 

women dedicated to lively on-stage performance and to the theatrics of on-stage singing. 

Since their founding in the spring of 1993, the Acoustics have quickly developed into a 

prominent figure in BC's musical community. Concentrating equally on musicality and 

entertainment, they feature an extremely wide range of musical generes, from ABBA to 

Annie Lennox, the Lion King to Lynyrd Skynyrd. The Acoustics perform primarily on 

campus and throughout the Boston area, but have also performed in locations as diverse as 

Los Angeles, CA, and Dublin, Ireland. Their first CD, Full Metal Pitch Pipe, was released 

in the spring of 1995, and they are currently at work on their second studio recording. 

Acoustics auditions are open to any and all BC students. No formal musical training is 

required, just a strong background in having fun. 



/oui 



bounded in 1986, the Bostonians proudly bear the title of BC's oldest a cappella group. 
The sixteen member, co-ed singing group is well-known for its perfect harmony, energetic 

concerts, random humor, and a contemporary sound unmatched by any other group. 

Their repertoire spans all music genres except country and classical, and includes songs by 

Seal, the Indigo Girls, Hootie and the Blowfish, and many others. The Bostonians have 

found the perfect balance between making music and having fun. Their sold-out shows 

have included guest groups from Tufts, Harvard, Amherst, UVA, and many others. The 

group has also spent time touring and has been well-received at Yale, Duke, and 

Georgetown. In addition, the Bostonians have performed per invitation in California and 

Florida. In their nine years of existence, they have earned a reputation as one of the 

premiere performance groups both on and off campus. The Bostonians most enjoy 

performing for their favorite audience - the students of Boston College. Any concert one 

attends will be filled with laughter, hidden surprises, and unforgettable moments that will 

bring one back for more. The Bostonians have recently released studio recordings 

Bostonian Baccananlia and Anthem. 



a capella 89 




Business Manager: Mary Alex Dundics 

Music Director: Lisa Stagno 

Group Manager: Stephanie Ford 

Treasurer: Cathy Tucker 

Publicity: Caitrin Lammon 




ghtsmen of Boston College 



Music Director: Chris Boscia 

President: Mike McAndrew 

Business Manager: Chris Kiely 

Treasurer: Seung Yun Cha 



90 a capella 




0j 

pleasure. " 

-Cmiliam&ellins 





Elena K. Vizvarv 




a cabelk ericere 




Lauren M. Prinelc 



ifyou want to sing out. 



funded in December of 1990, The BC Sharps is Boston College's best (and only) 

all-female a cappella group. Composed of twelve to sixteen women, the Sharps 
combine their creative vocal stylings with their unique brand of humor, successfully 
breaking away from the "Mr. Sandman" type of traditional female a cappella. They 
have performed extensively on and off-campus, participating in Boston University's 
Beanpot of A Cappella since its inception. The Sharps repertoire ranges from Janis 
Joplin to Pearl Jam and the Indigo Girls. They have recently released their first CD 
entitled Verbatim. Auditions are held at the beginning of each semester. 



/he 



le Heightsmen of Boston College is a twelve to sixteen member all-male a 
cappella group dedicated to musical excellence and the unadulterated pursuit of 
fun. Organized in 1990, this group has quickly established itself as a prominent 
musical group on campus. From cartoons to classic, rap to do-wop, the student- 
run Heightsmen perform from a wide musical repertoire. Auditions are held 
throughout the year and are open to all tenors and basses of the Boston College 

community. 



a capella 91 




President: Brian Soucek 

Vice President: Matt Lane 

Social Director: Stephanie Gaviglia 

Secretary: Matthew Harrison 

Secretary: Jennifer Pish 



///adriGALS 



President: Erin Mary Ackerman 

VP/Publicity: Lauren M. Pringle 

Conductor: Laetitia Blain 





XyPeare 

the music- 
makers, 

A^nd we- 
ave the 

dreamers of 
dreams. " 

-A. © QShaufh/iessp 



KMMBMV 



9Z vocal performance 














hmitiful hmwmes 




Lauren M. Pringlc 



if you want to singout. 



the University Chorale of Boston College is one of the finest collegiate choruses in 
North America. The group, a student-run organization, is comprised of 150 men and 
women. The Chorale is under the direction of John Finney, a renowned musician who 
has worked as Chorus master and Associate Conductor for Boston's Handel & Haydn 
Society. The Chorale performs works of both contemporary and classical composers. Its 
repertoire runs the gamut of secular to sacred music. In recent years the group has sung 
Mozart's Requiem, Haydn's Lord Nelson Mass, Orff s Carmina Burana and premieres of 
several original compostions. This year, the Chorale participated in the "Pops on the 
Heights" concert in Conte Forum on September 1 5 and it held its own concerts 
throughout the year. The group also travels outside of Boston to perform. Most recently 
the group sang in the Bahamas, Rome, Puerto Rico, and Ireland. This year's Spring 
Break found the chorus in Rome once again. All members of the Boston College 
community — undergrads, graduate students, faculty and staff- 
are invited to audition!!! 



-SD 



L 



le Boston College Madrigals Singers are an a capella group dedicated to singing the 

music of centuries past. The Madrigals, recently transformed into an all-female 

MadriGALS group, perform light-hearted ballads from which they take their name, as 

well as sacred pieces. The MadriGALS presented their first full-length concert this year in 

St. Mary's to a nearly sold-out crowd. The MadriGALS also perform at the Christmas 

Concert with the University Chorale, and at their own private Spring concert. In 

addition to the Christmas Concert, the MadriGALS also lead the Messiah sing, 

performed for the first time in St. Ignatius' church this year. 

Boston College Madrigal Singers - truly 'inspired' a capella. 



vocal performance 93 




94 bands 



kmdmcjta 





Conductor: Sebastian Bonaiuto 

Asst. Conductor: Bob Ambrose 

Executive Board: Kelly Milward 

Executive Board: Michael Murphy 

Executive Board: Stephanie Seiss 




band 95 




bOp! 
Executive Board: 

Brian Banker 

Collin Ely 

Thomas Esperiqueta 

Edward Smith 




Coordinators: 

Kristen Turick 

Rebecca Stronach 

Brian Melillo 




Executive Board: 

Kelly Milward 

Michael Murphy 

Stephanie Seiss 



96 bands 




1 



I 









celebrate the spirit in tune... 



k 



■x, bOp! is an ensemble dedicated to the highest levels of instrumental and vocal jazz 
performance. Membership is determined by audition. Instrumentation for B.C. bOp! 
consists of five saxophones, five trumpets, four trombones, piano, guitar, bass, drums, 

auxiliary percussion, and a vocal ensemble of four to six mixed voices. B.C. bOp! 

performs jazz and popular music from the 1940's to the 1990's, and appeals to a wide 

range of musical tastes. Students within the ensemble are encouraged to challenge 

themselves musically and to grow as a team. Past performance locations include Carnegie 

Hall; the Club Med resorts in Huatulco and Cancun, Mexico; Paradise Island in the 

Bahamas; the Jamaica Grande Resort in Ocho Rios, Jamaica; BC class reunions, dances 

and other school functions, an annual concert at Robsham Theatre, and the New 

England Collegiate Jazz Festival. In the spring of 1996, B.C. bOp! performed, by 

invitation, in Orlando, Florida at Jazzfest USA, a jazz ensemble festival jointly sponsered 

by Downbeat magazine and the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz. 

enthusiasm, loud cheers, catchy tunes, and spirit are what the sixty members of the Pep 

Band bring to the Men's Hockey and Basketball seasons. Donned in maroon and gold 

rugby shirts and toting everything from the high-trilling piccolo to the largest, lowest 

sousaphone, the students lend both music and support to the teams. Tunes range from 

the toe-tapping, "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" to the danceable "Jungle Boogie" to the fan 

favorite, "Hey!" The crowd has no choice but to clap along to the familiar "For Boston" 

to welcome the teams in and to celebrate every goal. Whether ringside to the court or the 

ice, the Pep Band is full of fun, great music, and, of course, pep! 



me BC Community Concert Band draws its membership from the greater Boston 

College community. Undergraduate students, graduate students, staff, faculty, and alumni 

participate in this unique ensemble. The Concert Band performs standard concert band 

repertoire as well as marches, Broadway and film music, and some popular music. The 

Concert Band presents a Christmas concert, a winter concert, and a spring concert each 

year. The Concert Band also performs combined concerts with other university bands. 



bands 97 





Andrew J. Boncek 





6?der of the Cross and Crown 



The Order of the Cross and Crown is an honor society reseved to members of 

the senior class of the College of Arts and Sciences. Seniors with a 3.5 

average or better will be invited by mail to apply for membership to the Cross 

and Crown in the summer before their senior year. Consistent membership 

and leadership in major campus extracurricular activities and a minimum 

average of 55 is the basis for admission. Members are inducted each spring 

in a ceremony. The student commencement speaker for the College of Arts 

and Sciences is the Chief Marshal of the Cross and Crown. 



98 honor 



worthy? of praise 

The Order of the 
Cross and Crown 





honor 99 




100 drama 




comedy of errors 



Kerry Girvin 



Kerry Girvin 





Kern' Girvin 

drama 101 




10Z drama 



exit sfaje tight 




drama 103 




104r drama 



drama creativa 





who killedgrcimpa? 



Jonathan Ralton 





Jonathan Ralton 

drama 105 





[a] live entertainment 



Hfy Mother s Fleabag 



General Manager: Courtney Shea 



106 comedy 



mmh and tumbb 



/Velio... 



Shovelhea 



ad 



Director: Simeon Buresch 

Asst. Director: Steve Fitzgerald 

Treasurer: Erica Browne 

Advisor: Christine Alger 




comedy 107 



; BIT! 

I 

■ 




Editor-in-Chief: Matthew Scamardella 

Editor-in-Chief elect: Lori Lefevre 

Managing Editor: Philippe Guerra 

Manager Editor elect: Steve Barwikowski 




President: Emily Engler 

Vice President: Becky Zychowski 

Video Yearbook VP.: Brian Murray 

Treasurer: Michael Riolo 



108 media 





Ik " # 


^\^c 




"V" 






\. 




4 W^:S 




Laurc 

stay informed & entertained. . . 



/he Heights is Boston College's weekly independent student newspaper, 

distributed free on campus. One of the largest organizations on campus, it is 

the only one that provides interested students with practical experience in all 

aspects of journalism: news, sports and feature writing, photography, copy 

editing, layout, advertising, and business management. In addition, Heights 

members are trained on state-of-the-art desktop publishing software on 

Macintosh equipment. Communications professors often recommend 

training on The Heights as important background for department majors. 

New writers are always welcome. In 1973, The Heights became The Heights, 

Inc., an independent, non-profit corporation which was copyrighted in 1984. 

Today it is entirely self-supporting, mostly through advertising, and is 

editorially independent of the University. The Heights can also be found 

on the Internet at: http:/www.bcheights.com. The editorial and business 

offices are located in McElroy Commons 113. 



-QD 



Cagle TV is a student run organization which allows students to produce 
features and shows to be run on BC cable television. Students generate ideas 
for productions, featuring everything from student life to sports to news, 
which they would like to be seen on BCTV. The students collaborate on 
projects and gain hands-on experience in filming and producing, VHS edit- 
ing, and producing in-studio spots. The Video Yearbook, a sub-committee of 

Eagle TV, is a video collection of activities and events occuring at BC 

throughout the year. Students participate in the creation of the yearbook by 

filming the various activities on campus. The BC Video Yearbook is sold at 

the end of the year to interested students. 



media 109 




The WZBC 
Sports Staff 






The WZBC 
General Staff 




Elena K. VLzvary 



spinning entertainment 



Wfa,c 



■ 



General Manager: Carla McKeand 

Program Director: Matthew Dornbush 

Music Director: Brian Wmauig 

Technical Director: Tay Moschella 



110 radio 



fcitlfulto the facts 




e Observer 



Editor-in-Chief: Anthony Wladyka 

Publisher: Kory Kramer 

Managing Editor: Sara Davidson 




Staff in action 



The Staff of 
"The Observer" 




news 111 




Kerry Girvin 





President: Kashleigh Greenwood 

Vice-President: Latisha Lipscomb 

Dir. of Public Affairs: Terrence Monagas 

Treasurer: Chantel Thompson 

Dir. of Publicity: Faith Patterson 

Secretary: Alvin Barnett 



m bs.f. 



representing wrietp 




President: Sophy Theam 

Vice-President: Omar Chaudhary 

Treasurer: Sunil Wadhwa 

Co-Executive: James Pak 

Co-Executive: Judy Pisnanont 



All Photos by Beverly Mather 




caucus US 




ktiw life 




President: Marielys Divanne 

Vice-President: Diana Novillo 

Treasurer: Danielle Birriel 

Secretary: Karla Rodriguez 

Public Relations: Omar Aponte 



114 o.l.a.a 



singing praises 




President: Faith Patterson 

Vice-President: Adele Reed 

Recording Secretary: Raquel Webster 

Treasurer: Denise Raynor 

Corresponding Secretary: Stacey Thompson 

Fundraiser: Tevonne Ellis 

Tour Manager: Candace Ashir 




voices 115 




• m, * 



writim 




cimnesty International 



Co-President: Katrina Brobeck 

Co-President: Dennis Murphy 

Treasurer: Prem J. Singh 

Advisor: Professor Charles Derber 



Kerry Girvin 




116 amnesty 



<tivin$ tim for our future 




PULSE COUNCIL 



Marissa Lopez, William Sutter, Brian Dunphy, Anisha Chablani, Kaitlin 

Gallagher, Kelly Heyer, Cynthia Hsu, Mimi Madigan, Erik Martire, Jessica 

McCabe, Anne Elizabeth Montgomery, Caitlin Murphy, A.J. Picchione, 

Jennifer Thalmann, Anshu Tiku, and Ed Zacharias. 




pulse 117 




Elena K. Vizvary 



jCfUtfk 




driustiee 



^ippalachia Volunteers 

Coordinator: Laura Walsh 

Coordinator: Mary Ellen Newman 

Advisor: Father Cleary 

"Working Together for a Better Spring Break" 



118 appalachia 



raising consciousness 




Director: Chris Goff 
Asst. Director: Claire McCarthy 
Benefit Director: Eddy Scannell 




a.a 119 




serriw) the world 




natio Volunteers 



Council Chair: Sarah Miner 

Council Vice-Chair: Matt Stautberg 

Secretary/Treasurer: Patrick Viterwyk 

Advisor: Father Ted Dziak 

lgnacio 'Volunteers organize international volunteer trips going to 

^Mexico. Belize, Dominican Republic and Jamaica. They provide a 

variety of services to the people in those areas including teaching, 

coaching as well as work-related activities. 



Courtesy of Judith Welling 



1Z0 ignatio 



creatiw writing 



Jtylus 



Editor-in-Chief: Meredith A. MacDonald 

Stylus is the undergraduate art and literature magazine 

of Boston College. All submissions are from the student 

body. See www.bc.edu/stylus for more information. 




stylus 111 




Melissa Cody 



fmiaks first 



W, 



omen's Resource Center 



Staff: Nicole Lako 

Staff: Shiela McMahon 

Staff: Becca Procopio 

Staff: Christine Safriet 

Graduate Assistant: Cari Burr 

'W^K.C is open to all women and men who are concerned with women's issues. It 

is a supportive environment where diverse opinions and perspectives can be 

voiced and respected. The primary function of the 'WJ^.C is the exploration 

and promotion of women's issues through educational outreach. 



1ZZ n>.r.c 



supjvrtitU) diwrsitp 




Co-Director: Danielle Murray 

Co-Director: Jason Williams 

UGBC Contact: Peter Glazer 

UGBC Contact: Vincent Tamuzza 

CGBC serves as a supportive, educational, active, confidential 

and social group. It is open to gay, lesbian, bisexual and 

transgendered people and their allies. Each year, the group works 

to improve the comfort of all BC students. 




l.g.b.c US 




(above) 

1997-1998 

O'Connell House 

Managerial Staff 

(right) 

Lori Lefevre and Pete Gerken 

share a dance in O.C.H. at one of the many 

balls held there throughout the year. 



haunted house? 



Zahir Pettiwalla 




Budget Manager: Michael Szarowicz 

Program Manager: Louis Corapi 

Community Manager: Sarah Strong 

Public Relations Manager: Stephen Grieco 

Publicity Manager: Jessica Schlueter 



124 o' conn ell 



celebrating the arts 



^Stplosi 



osion 



Producer: Chelsea Arscott 

Art Director: Pam Narkin 

Producer Assistant: Romelia Salazar 

Art Director Assistant: Rebecca Stronack 

Treasurer: Ertha Brathwaite 




art! US 




Torofallsad 

wordsof 

tongue or pen, 

thesaddest 

are these it 

mighthave 

been. " 

-whittier 



1Z6 closing 




allcfuietm the be front 



life without activities 



k 



Cow would your life be without activities? Without the late nights, the long 
meetings, the hard work, life would just not be the same. But our individual 
lives would not be as drastically changed without activites as would the Boston 
College campus. Activites and Extra-Curriculars are the life-blood of the energy 

here on campus. Without activities many people's lives would be incredibly 

different; including not only people on this campus, but people in Boston and 

the entire surrounding area. Activities reach out and touch the members of our 

college community, but also lend a helping hand to the less fortunate. Without 

them, life would be severely altered. Things just wouldn't be the same... 




closing 1Z7 




Kerry Girvini 



"in the arena 

of human life, 

thehewrsfall 

te these whe 

sliewtheir 

good cfualities 

maetwn " 

-anstetle 



128 closing 





activism in action 



/u< 



'uckily, the Boston College campus IS an incredibly active campus. There are 

nearly one hundred different organized extra-curricular groups here, ranging 

from the Asian Caucus to the PULSE program, doing everything from 

celebrating diversity to helping the homeless. Countless people put in countless 

hours, including long nights and weekend time to make this campus what it is. 

To all those that are not involved, join a club - the rewards that you reap will far 

outweigh the sacrifices that you make. To all those that are already very involved 

at Boston College - a sincere and heartfelt thank you for all that you do from the 

college, the community and even the City of Boston. 




dosing 1Z9 



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STUDENT LIFE 

I Tea pie and Tlaces | 



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rom the moment we arrive at 
Boston College, we are 
immersed into a community of 
diverse interests, personalities, 
and lifestyles. By taking 
advantage of all that our 
surroundings have to offer, each 
of us finds our own place within 
that community as well as our 
own individuality. 



Inner Reflections 




Editor - Amy Snyder 



Teople and Tlaces 131 



Tjfie Heights 



J. he Gasson clock chimes the hour as the golden sun makes 
its final pass behind the traditional gothic buildings. It is at this 
time of day, when trees catch the sunlight, windows reflect the 
towers, and the golden eagle gleams just before sunset, that the 
true beauty of the Boston College campus shines. 

From freshman orientation through senior graduation 
ceremonies, the Heights offers amazing campus experiences. 
BC students identify each year by their surroundings on Upper, 
Lower, and Newton campuses. For freshmen, the dorms on 
Upper and Newton become a second home as they meet people 
and begin new friendships. Ties to which freshman dorm one 
lived in is something that most students find carries with them 
throughout all four years at BC. Sophomores enter their "not 
quite a freshman anymore" second year with the transition to 
Lower campus. Most juniors live off-campus and are faced with 
the realities of real-life landlords and bills, and the added 
pressures of getting to campus on time for classes. Senior year 
is about looking to the future while enjoying the last year at BC, 
spening time with old friends in the Mods or Hillsides. 

Students take full advantage of BC's beautiful surroundings 
by reading on a bench on O'Neill Plaza, taking a nap on the 
Dustbowl, or studying by the light that shines through a stained 
glass window in Bapst Library. The Heights has a perfect mix 
of tradition, beauty and pride. When returning to campus after 
a long summer or Christmas break, distinctive landmarks such 
as the Gasson Tower are visible from miles away and seem to 
lead us back to the campus that we love. 

Visitors, parents, and prospective students are awed by the 
gothic architecture and gorgeous grounds here at the Heights. 
Fans and alumni return with their maroon and gold to keep the 
spirit and enthusiasm for BC alive. 

Loved by students, faculty, and visitors alike, the Heights is 
more than just a place to attend classes or see a game. Long after 
the final strains of "Pomp and Circumstance" have ended, 
memories of this beauty just outside Boston will remain. 

Janine Dawson '00 



132 Campus 





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Elena K. Vizvarv 




be. Mary's Hall, home to the 
Boston College Jesuit 
community, is one of the many 
gothic style buildings on campus. 

Arches and lancet windows are a 
trademark on campus, as shown 
in this foyer, lo 
College Road. 



looking out onto 



Wasson Tower serves as the 
perfect backdrop to The Heights, 
a landscape characterized by 
colorful flowers and budding 



Lower campus has a distinctive 
beauty all its own, as shown by a 
unique perspective on Conte 
Forum and Alumni Stadium. 



Campus 133 



T\ he Dustbowl 



l\ person comfortably reclining under a tree with a book 
and a group of students in sneakers and shorts playing Frisbee or 
football. These are just a few of the images that come to mind 
when BC students thinks about the Dustbowl. Since its days as 
the campus' official dusty sports field, this meeting place has 
achieved a higher status. Now that it is thoroughly grass- 
covered, the Dustbowl's importance to student life as the 
campus green has grown over the years. 

The beautiful autumnal leaves in October and November 
make the Dustbowl a majestic sight. While in the early months 
of the semester, it is a gathering place for many students during 
their lunch hour. There is no better place to sit and relax while 
enjoying the benefits of people watching in the last few warm 
weather days. 

In the winter, the Dustbowl is a prime location for snowball 
fights or building a snowman for everyone to admire. While 
students scurry to class to get out of the cold, they can not help 
but notice the glistening trees and sun reflecting off newly fallen 
snow after a storm. 

In the spring, the trees' leaves begin to bud, making it one of 
the most picturesque places on campus. The Dustbowl becomes 
alive with spring fever. The annual SpringFest celebration is one 
event which makes use of the combination of beautiful weather 
and the open space of the Dustbowl. 

Melissa M. McGann '98 




Kerry Girvin 



134 The Dustbowl 




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Kerry Girvin 



Otudying on the Dustbowl 
under a tree is a great way to 
enjoy the fall foliage. 

1 he Dustbowl attracts all 
different types of past-times, as 
seen by these students playing 
drums on the grass. 

On sunny days, many students 
choose to bring their lunch 
outside and relax while people 
watching. 

Laughing with friends and 
taking advantage of those rare 
warm October days, these BC 
students epitomize what the 
Dustbowl is all about. 






\ 



' ^"s* 



1-5 

In 



The Dustbowl 135 



E\agle Pride 



W e are...BC!" the crowd shouts during a home football 
game. Maroon and gold pom-poms wave energetically in the 
student section of Alumni Stadium. Regardless of the 
circumstances, BC students are always there to support their 
fellow classmates on the team. 

One of the most evident displays of school spirit occurred on 
the weekend of October 25, 1997 - the legendary Notre Dame 
vs. Boston College football matchup, better known as "The 
Holy War." To show their pride, many students made the long 
voyage to South Bend, Indiana. By sporting maroon and gold 
apparel, and decorating winnebagos with BC banners, BC made 
its presence known in the land of the "Fightin' Irish". 

Football isn't the only sport that attracts students' attention. 
Hockey and basketball continue to draw huge crowds of screaming 
fans as well. 

The community also displays school spirit around campus. 
By simply being involved, most students create a sense of BC 
pride. By taking part in the many activities offered to 
undergraduates, the student body strengthens its ties to the 
school. Participation and devotion are a common characteristic 
at Boston College and it is the students that keep this tradition 
alive. 



Lindsey Shaw "00 




GOBC 




Melissa Cody I 



136 School Spirit 





Doston College pride is best 
exemplified by this enthusiastic 
fan, doing push-ups in the crowd 
after the Eagles scored. 



r or serious Boston College fans, 
a day of rooting on the Eagles is 
not complete without pom poms, 
hats, face paint, and non-stop 
screaming. 

1 hese fans take a break from 
cheering to smile for the camera. 



School Spirit 157 



P arents' Weekend 



1 he weekend of September 26 - 28, 1997 marked Boston 
College's annual Parents' Weekend. Most students prepared for 
their parents' arrival by cleaning their rooms and replacing 
magazines and video games on the coffee table with textbooks 
and highlighters. The weekend turned out to be a busy one, with 
many great family events. 

Many parents arrived Friday afternoon in order to attend the 
fifth annual Pops on the Heights benefit concert, featuring the 
Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra. This year, Pops on the 
Heights was even more special as Boston Pops Laureate Conductor 
John Williams returned to lead the ensemble. The concert was 
a great success, with a laser light show and the Boston College 
Chorale adding to the enjoyment of the night. The event raised 
over $ 1 million for Boston College's scholarship endowment. 

On Saturday, most families enjoyed the BC tailgating 
tradition, then attended the Cincinnati vs. BC football game at 
Alumni Stadium that evening. Although the Eagles did not win 
the game, parents and students were treated to an exciting 
experience where they could show their BC spirit. 

On Sunday, many students attended the Parents' Weekend 
Mass, held on O'Neill Plaza. The outdoor setting and beautiful 
weather was a great way to bring a close to the weekend's 
activities. This was the day to say goodbye to the folks as college 
life returned to normal. 

Parents' Weekend was a special time to visit with family and 
friends. It was more than free meals and exciting events. Even 
students whose parents were unable to attend partook in the 
weekend festivities, being "adopted" by a roommate or friend's 
parents. Most importantly, if only for a couple of days, parents 
were able to experience student life at Boston College. 



Rachel Cohen '98 



138 Taverns "Weekend 











v , 



V 



d? 



Mft 



Kerry Girvin 

r ather Leahy was 
the celebrant at the 
annual Parents' 
Weekend Mass held 
on O'Neill Plaza. 



r# 




1 arents and students 
reunited on campus 
throughout the 
weekend. Students 
took the opportunity 
to show their parents 
around such 
commonly visited 
areas as the quad. 

1 hese BC students 
and parents take part 
in tailgating 
festivities in the 
mods. 

Conductor John 
Williams entertained 
the crowd at Pops on 
the Heights with his 
world renowned 
musical talent and 
expertise. 






Vavents Weekend 139 



Boston 



v„ 



irtually anytime of day or night, BC students can see, on 
the horizon, Boston's skyline just a few miles east of Chestnut 
Hill. It is a city with a unique culture, customs, and spirit all its 
own. As Boston College students we have the luxury of exploring 
such a city and taking advantage of all it has to offer. 

A typical downtown outing may include a shopping trip to 
Fanueil Hall. It's not just about shopping, but about a great 
atmosphere. The marketplace is always visited by tourists, and 
is a great place to find a unique gift, a Boston tee- shirt, some 
delicious ice cream, or enjoy the music of street performers. Day 
or night, Winter or Summer, Faneuil Hall marketplace is always 
busy and alive with excitement. 

Another vibrant and exciting location is the famous Harvard 
Square. This is a place where a student can shop in eclectic stores, 
go to restaurants, and see numerous street performers on any 
given day. The off-beat area is a haven for curiousity seekers and 
is a fun place to spend an afternoon. 

Boston is also a great sports town. With the newly constructed 
Fleet Center, spectators can enjoy a Bruins or Celtics game only 
a short T ride away. The city's spirit really comes alive when fans 
rally behind their hometown team. You can also catch a little 
Beantown baseball fever by attending a Red Sox game at historic 
Fenway Park. 

For those who like something a little more cultural and 
perhaps a little more relaxing, there is the Museum of Fine Arts. 
Thousands of great works of art are easily accessible to BC 
students, and admission to the museum is free with a student ID. 

When the weather is nice, going downtown to the Public 
Garden, or to the Commons is a great way to soak in the sun and 
enjoy the beautiful surroundings. Take a ride in a swan boat, 
rollerblade, or read a book - the possibilities are endless. 

Whether it is enjoying an Italian feast in a restaurant in the 
North End, watching a play or the ballet in the theater district, 
or visiting one of the many authentic Irish pubs, the "Boston 
experience" is something that every BC student should take 
advantage of. 

Boston is a city which one can continue to explore throughout 
the years and if you dig deep enough, you can find some amazing 
things that you wouldn't otherwise have had the chance to 
experience. From street jugglers and musicians to art festivals 
and out-of-the-way restaurants, Boston is a city with new and 
exciting alternatives to campus life around ever corner - only a T 
ride away. 

Amy L.Snyder '98 



14-0 Boston 




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An artist takes advantage of the 
nice weather and creates an 
image of a portion of Boston's 
distinctive skyline. 

1 he gold dome of the State 
House, adjacent to Boston 
Common, is a landmark that can 
be seen from miles away. 

Dostonians gather around City 
Hall Plaza and listen to 
performers at Mixfest, a free 
concert event. 

1 he Swan Boats at the Public 
Garden is a popular way to relax 
and enjoy a bit of nature in the 
middle of the city. 



Boston 141 



Head of the Charles 



1 he Head of the Charles is one of the premier regattas of 
the fall crew season. As its title suggests, it is held on the 
Charles River in Boston. 1 997 was an important milestone in 
the regatta's history as it was the first time in the 32 year 
history of the regatta that it was held over a two day span. On 
October 18-19, more than 5,600 athletes and 300,000 spectators 
converged on the banks of the Charles to witness and participate 
in athleticism and sportsmanship at its best. 

For the athletes, the Head of the Charles is the fall race 
that they work for throughout the season. For the Boston 
College Men's and Women's Crew teams, the Head of the 
Charles allows the rowers to compete against other varsity 
squads with the support of the home crowd. 

The Head of the Charles is a great way to spend an 
afternoon for both serious racing fans and those who just want 
to see what all the excitement is about. The banks of the river 
are alive with commotion and enthusiasm, radio stations and 
companies set up promotional booths, and there are a lot of fun 
things to do and see. Whether one likes to watch the rowers, 
or watch the crowd, the Head of the Charles is a fun way to 
experience an integral part of Boston tradition. 

Jennifer Erin Raterman '99 




Kern' Girvin 



14Z Jiead of 'the Charles 




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Opectators gather beside the 
footbridge to sit in the shade as 
boaters race by. 

group of crew racing 
enthusiasts choose to sit on top of 
the bridge overlooking the 
Charles to gain a bird's eye view 
on the race. 

1 his woman and her canine 
companion prove that the Head 
of the Charles and its festivities 
appeals to all kinds of curiosity 
seekers. 

r inding a quiet place along the 
banks of the Charles and relaxing 
on a blanket is a popular way to 
watch the race. 



**^ 









Head of The Charles 143 




omecoming Ball 



T, 



his year's Homecoming Ball was held on Friday, October 
3, 1997 at The Sheraton in downtown Boston. The UGBC 
sponsored event lasted from 9:00 pm until 1 :00 am and was the 
first ever Homecoming to sell out. The college provided free 
transportation in the form of shuttle buses and allowed students 
to arrive and leave when they pleased. 

Once inside, one could choose to eat from any of the various 
food tables. There was everything from fresh fruit to chicken 
wings, all included in the price of the ticket. There was also a cash 
bar, and for those over 2 1 , beer and wine could be purchased. 

When not eating or drinking or talking with friends, most of 
the night's memories were made on the dance floor. A large 
wooden area in the center of the spacious, beautifully decorated 
ballroom was where students spent most of the night. A wide 
variety of music was played by the DJ and people seemed to enjoy 
everything from nostalgic '80's pop songs to contemporary 
favorites. 

Typically thought of as a predominantly senior event, this 
year's Homecoming Ball was attended by more freshmen, 
sophomores, and juniors, allowing for a rare time when students 
from all classes come together in a social setting. It was a great 
way to get psyched for the next day's home football game against 
Georgia Tech and to celebrate the beginning of a new school 
year. 



Amy L. Snyder '98 




Courtesy of Jennifer Ya 



144 Jiomecoming 




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Courtesy of Amy Snyder 



1 hree BC girls take time out 
from dancing to pose for a quick 
snapshot. 

1 he night was a time to spend 
with friends, as shown by these 
students pausing for a group hug. 

Homecoming was a time to 
dance and socialize, while 
enjoying the elegant atmosphere 
of the Ballroom. 

r riends gathered for 
pre-Homecoming parties to get 
an early start on the evening's 
festivities. 



I 



/, 



Homecoming 145 



^I'Connell 



V_>J Connell House is located in the heart of Upper Campus 
and is home to a variety of student clubs. It is also a popular 
spot to hold university events. As the student union of Boston 
College, O'Connell is intended to be a social meeting spot, as 
well as a place to learn and have fun. Students can enjoy 
everything from small, intimate coffee house style concerts to 
a stand up comedian. 

O'Connell House has an on-site staff, made up of under- 
graduate students, that plan activities throughout the year. 
As the location of the annual Christmas Mass, the Grand Hall 
is packed with students and decorated with lights, trees, and 
garlands. This holiday spirit is continued with the annual 
Breaking of the Barriers Ball in December. The highlight of 
O'Connell House's programming is the annual MiddleMarch 
Ball. This year will mark the 25th anniversary of the popular 
costume extravaganza. 

The newly renovated building is as unique as its activities. 
With intricately carved banisters and railings, chandeliers and 
wood floors, O'Connell House is one of the most beautiful 
buildings on campus. Because of its old looking interior and 
creaky floors, O'Connell has even been rumored to be haunted. 
For the superstitious, it is definitely worth checking out. 

Amy L. Snyder 




Kerry Girvin 



146 O'Connell Jiouse 




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Melissa Cody 

Dinger Ellis Paul was one of the 
many musical acts to entertain 
students this year at O'Connell 
House. 

Comedian Julie Barr made 
students laugh during her stand 
up act. 

Otudents and faculty dance the 
night away at the annual 
Breaking the Barriers Ball. 

Ejveryone seems to have fun 
when comedians and performers 
involve the audience in their 
routine. 



O'Connell Jiouse 14-7 



Outside the Gates 



1 here are many places around Boston College that are not 
"technically" considered part of BC, but have been adopted by 
students as an essential part of campus life and part of the 
"Boston College experience." Two of the most popular off- 
campus areas are the Reservoir and Cleveland Circle. Both of 
these extended parts of the Boston College campus provide 
students with many activities to occupy their time and make the 
college area more enjoyable and fulfilling. 

The Reservoir, affectionately nicknamed "the Res," is the 
perfect place to relieve stress and tension from a busy day. It is 
a bit of nature stuck in the middle of the bustling surroundings. 
The Res' 2.2 mile circumference is ideal for many forms of 
exercise. On any given day one can find students running, 
walking, or biking around the path that goes around the Reservoir. 
During the winter, people have even been known to go cross- 
country skiing. 

BC might seem islolated if it didn't have Cleveland Circle 
nearby. This area provides students with access to a movie 
theater, a hardware store, a liquor store, a floral shop, CVS, two 
banks, several convenience stores, and restuarants. Cleveland 
Circle has virtually everything that a college student would need, 
and is only a few minutes away on the BC shuttle bus. 

Cleveland Circle also comes alive at night when students visit 
restaurants and bars after hours. The weekend starts on 
Wednesday and lasts through Sunday in Cleveland Circle at 
such places as Mary Ann's, Roggies, and City Side. Students 
often pass through Cleveland Circle on their way downtown. 
The Reservoir T-stop is a quick way to get into the city and is 
located right across from the movie theater and the Ground 
Round. 

Other spots where one is bound to find BC students are 
located right across from campus on Commonwealth Avenue. 
Maddie's Market, White Mountain Creamery, Rollwich, the 
dry cleaners, and College Sub are all supported by the BC 
community. 

These areas are all extremely close and easily accessible to 
Boston College. Life in a college town can be found if one simply 
ventures outside the gates. 

Rachel Cohen '98 



148 Around BC 






Iveservoir T-stop is conveniently 
located in Cleveland Circle, 
making the D-line easily 
accessible to BC students. 

White Mountain Creamery is an 
old-standby for students looking 
for ice-cream, coffee, a relaxing 
place to catch up with friends, or 
a change of sceenery while 
studying. 

r lower shops, video stores, and 
restaurants line the streets of 
Cleveland Cirlce, offering 
students many shopping and 
entertainment options. 

L.ityside restaurant and bar in 
Cleveland Circle is a popular 
place to have a drink, watch a 
sporting event, or simply sit and 
look out of the large picture 
windows. 



Around BC U9 



0±h What a Night.. 



It is said that at college less than half of the entire experience 
occurs in the classroom. Perhaps the most important part of 
college is the social growth and relationships that students form 
during these four years. One part of learning that is synonymous 
with college is partying. It is through social settings like this that 
college students get the chance to meet new people and bond 
with friends, creating memories that will last a lifetime. A party 
for some is a night with a few friends, a few bags of popcorn, and 
a stack of movies. For others, it's a 200 person gathering with a 
DJ and beer. Whatever the definition, parties are a major part 
of a Boston College student's life. 

Parties can be found around the BC campus and surroundings 
on almost every Friday and Saturday night. The Mods are always 
a sure bet to find at least one great party with loud music and tons 
of people. The off campus scene is also well-known to juniors 
living in Brighton, and is a popular place to go to a party after the 
on-campus ones are over. 

Another common way to celebrate is to have a theme parties. 
Students have anything from cocktail parties to "Around the 
World" parties to traditional "toga" parties. Halloween is always 
a big night on campus, with costume parties galore. "Decade" 
parties are also a hysterical way to see friends dress up like John 
Travolta in the '70's or Madonna in the '80's. 

Whether they are tailgating, celebrating a holiday or birthday, 
throwing a theme party, or just rewarding themselves for a hard 
week of work, students have good (clean?) fun. From a dorm 
room in Rubenstein Hall to an apartment on South Street, BC 
students know how to celebrate. 

Michael Gross '00 
Amy L. Snyder '98 



150 Tarrying 






(? 




Courtesy of Toni-Ann Gaudiosi 

Dirthdays are one of the most 
popular reasons to celebrate with 
Friends. 

1 hese BC guys are having a great 
time proving that a party is one 
of the best ways to relax after a 
busy week. 

Halloween parties are a fun way 
to spend time with friends and 
see people in all different kinds of 
costumes. 

1 oga parties are a classic choice 
for those who want to have a 
theme party. 



Tarrying 151 



F ood and Friends 



l\re you hungry? How about some rotisserie chicken and 
homemade mashed potatoes? What about a hot stir fry from the 
grill, some pasta, or a wrapper sandwich? The Boston College 
Dining Halls offer a myriad of choices for every meal - from 
breakfast to late night. Though it's not exactly Mom's cooking, 
most students agree that BC does its best to provide quality food 
with a lot of variety. 

Wherever one is on campus, it is never far from a place to eat. 
On Upper Campus, McElroy Commons is home to a main 
dining room, The Eagle's Nest, and The Cafe. The main dining 
area is the place for traditional, informal dining. Students can 
grab anything from a bowl of soup to roast beef on any given day. 
If coffee and some thoughtful conversation are prefered, then 
the Cafe is the spot. Students can also enjoy either Dunkin' 
Donuts or a treat from Friendly's ice cream. On Wednesday 
nights, the Cafe is turned into a culinary adventure with various 
International and cultural foods being served. Craving a sandwich 
or a salad at lunchtime? The Eagle's Nest is the place to "meet 
and greet" friends and enjoy a made-to-order sandwich or 
wrapper. 

For fast food junkies, The Rat (AKA: Lyons Dining Hall) 
stocks burgers, fries, and the ever-popular chicken fingers, 
emulating McDonald's style. Lower Dining Hall offers many 
choices as well. It offers traditional entrees as well as made-to- 
order grilled items. Upstairs is the Italian restaurant style dining 
hall, Addie's, - a great place to catch up with roommates and 
friends after a long day. Here the specialties are pasta, fresh pizza, 
subs, and lasagna. 

So, when hungry between 7am and 2am, chances are good 
that everyone can find something satisfying at one of the dining 
halls on campus. After that, the world of take-out and delivery 
is the best bet. ...And hey, the Eagle One meal card can even be 
used to order Papa Gino's! 



Janine Dawson '00 



^3^ 



15Z Dining flails 






Kern- Girvii 



Dinner at Lower Dining Hall 
brings a smile to this student's 
face as he carries his tray through 
the main dining room. 

1 he cafe ar McElroy is home to 
Dunkin' Donuts and Friendly's, 
a very popular stop for studenrs 
on their way to class. 

1 aul, who works in the main 
dining room ar McElroy, always 
has a smile and interesting 
conversation for everyone. 

r resh bagels are one of the many 
breakfast options in the dining 
halls at BC. 



Dining flails 153 



Energizing Exercise 



.TVmong the gothic buildings of Boston College, the Flynn 
Recreation Complex just does not look like it belongs. 
Affectionately known as "the Plex," it is a long, short building on 
Lower Campus with a roof that looks like a huge tent. 

The Plex is home to Boston College's swimming, diving, water 
polo, track, fencing, and tennis programs. Once inside, one will 
also find an 1/8 mile track, a full wall of stairmasters, Lifecylces, 
Nordic tracks, nautilus-type equipment, tennis, racquet ball, 
and basketball courts. Aerobics, Tai-Kwon-Do, and other 
instructional classes are offered as well. 

Any registered student or faculty member can use the facility 
to work out, play some ball, or swim laps. If one wants to get 
in shape, stay in shape, or just want to watch everyone else, then 
head down to the Plex and check it out. The possibilities are 
endless and most people find that there is something they will 
enjoy. 



Michael Gross '00 




154 TheTlex 





Elena K. Vizvarv 



Dasketball is a common activity 
at the Plex, whether it is 
intramurals or one-on-one. 

Dtudent employees at the Plex are 
available to loan out equipment 
and sign people up for exercise 
machines. 

/Aerobics and step classes are held 
several times a day for all students 
and faculty at BC. 

Oit-ups and leg stretches are a 
common sight on the mats 
alongside the indoor track. 



155 TheTlex 



Tjiflgating Tradition 



W hat do most Boston College students do on autumn 
Saturday mornings? Party, of course. After all, tailgating is an 
integral part of being a BC student. Before any home football 
game the campus is energized - people decked out in maroon and 
gold are everywhere. Tailgating is as much a part of a BC football 
game as the game itself. Any game is always more fun after a 
breakfast of hot dogs and chips. 

From the early morning until well after the game has ended, 
one can find students, alumni, family, and friends feasting and 
celebrating in Shea Field, the parking garages, the Mods, and any 
other parking lot on lower campus. Rain or shine, win or lose, 
the party continues. Thousands of people each have their own 
little supply of good food, drinks and music. Some fans are so 
wrapped up in the pre-game celebration that they end up 
missing the opening kick-off. 

A famous part of Boston College tailgating exists in the 
Mods. These townhouse-style buildings are home to many 
seniors, and students take full advantage of Mod barbeques as a 
way to celebrate their last football season at the Heights. This 
notorious "party spot" is a great place to socialize with friends 
before a game and get psyched for an Eagle victory. If awakened 
at 8:00 am on an autumn Saturday morning by the smell of 
charcoal and an abnormally loud "Let's get ready to rumble," the 
odds are that a Mod is gearing up for the day's festivities. 

Tailgating not only rallies people together, but shows the 
pride of Boston College. No matter how well the football team 
does on the field, the tailgating tradition as the number one way 
of showing Eagle spirit will live on. 

Rachel Cohen '98 




156 Tailgating 






Elena K. Vizvaiy 



ailgating with friends before a 
football game is a common 
Saturday morning ritual at 
Boston College. 

Doston College students get 
pumped for the game against 
Army by tailgating in the Mods. 

fVlod life is best characterized by 
its notorious and festive 
atmosphere on game days. 

r amily, friends, and several 
generations of Alumni come 
together to celebrate on Shea 
Field. 



Tailgating 157 



Qlass of 2001 



1 he class of 2001 has finished its first full year at Boston 
College. Leaving high school behind, they were faced with many 
new and exciting opportunities at BC and in the city of Boston 
itself. Their experience has been one of transition, adjustment, 
and growth. 

The first year at Boston College is usually spent meeting new 
people, exploring a different environment, and learning how to 
live on one's own. This "learning" includes making crucial 
decisions such as whether to go to Who s On First on Thursday 
night or to stay home and write a Perspectives paper. It also 
means taking on responsibilities such as doing your own laundry, 
deciding what classes to take, setting your own curfew, and not 
having your mom to wake you up in the morning. The newly 
acquired freedom is exciting, however, it can take some getting 
used to. Adj usting to the college lifestyle of balancing schoolwork, 
extracurricular activities, sometimes a job, and the dynamic 
social scene can be a difficult transition. 

The freshman class is housed in residence halls either on 
Newton or Upper Campus. The debate over which 
accomodations are better will likely continue until graduation 
day. No matter where one lives freshmen year, there are some 
universal aspects. The residence hall is where students who were 
strangers in September will form the tight bonds that will create 
friendships that will last throughout their years here. Fitting all 
one's possessions into a small room, while sharing that space with 
at least one other person, can be an excercise in creativity and 
patience. Walking down a long, cold hallway to go to the 
bathroom and wearing flip flops in the shower is also a new and 
memorable experience for most freshmen. 

Being a member of the class of 2001 is both exciting and 
challenging. These BC students have a year full of memories that 
will be some of the best of their college career and have another 
three years to look forward to. 



Amy L. Snyder '98 



YV 



1AM Q 



158 freshmen 






Patrick Morrissev 



W illiams Hall, on College road, 
is a typical example of resident 
housing for members of the class 
of 2001. 

1 his student enjoys being able 
to buy just about anything with 
his meal card at McElroy Dining 
Room. 

DCs phone systems take some 
getting used to when freshmen 
arrive on campus. 

Residence halls are a perfect 
place to play silly games and late 
night stunts. 



freshmen 159 



C] lass of 2000 



lor the class of 2000, the fall semester marked the start of 
their second year at Boston College. No longer freshmen, but 
not quite upperclassmen, sophomores had already experienced 
a year of changes as the next step in their college career began. 

The new year meant a change of scenery as many sophomores 
moved from Upper and Newton Campuses to Lower Campus. 
Relatively comfortable four, six, and eight - man suites in Walsh 
Hall, Vanderslice, 90 St. Thomas More Drive, and Edmond's 
Hall replaced cramped double and triple single dorm rooms. For 
the many that battled the Newton buses last year, a quick walk 
to Middle Campus was a welcome relief as the way to get to 
classes - on time! 

The focus was on career planning during this second year, 
and many sophomores declared a maj or, or at least contemplated 
one. Students began to work on these degree requirments. This 
didn't mean that the class of 2000 was all work and no play, 
however. "We still know how to have fun" said one Walsh 
resident. 

Although freshman year was full of new experiences, many 
sophomores enjoyed the ease and comfort that surrounded their 
second year. "Once we hit junior year, it's time to start planning 
seriously for the future" said one sophomore. 

Preparing for the second half of college, sophomores will 
remember fondly their beginnings here at BC. With two years 
down and two more to go, the Class of 2000 is looking ahead. 



Janine Dawson '00 



T*T 



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Kerry Gi 



160 Sophomores 






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40 m^i 






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ourtesy of Janine Dawson 

1 his sophomore student is 
hitting the books while relaxing 
in her room. 

Dophomore year is the year 
when friendships are 
strengthened and good times are 
abundant. 

rinally getting to live on lower 
campus is reason enough for this 
large group of students to 
celebrate. 

W alsh Hall, home to many 
members of the class of 2000, is 
famous for its temperamental 
elevators. 



Sophomores 161 



Cilass of 1999 



nr. 



J. he class of 1999 is one that has gone through many 
changes this year. Junior year at Boston College is often a year 
when classmates and friends are going in many different directions. 
Roughly seventy-five percent of the class lives off campus, 
scattered around the Brookline and Brighton areas. Some 
students chose to become Resident Assistants and move back 
into freshman dorms or other locations on lower campus. Some 
students who were lucky enough to have four years of housing 
live in Edmonds, 90 St. Thomas More Drive, or Vanderslice 
Hall. This is difficult to get used to, after being used to having 
virtually all one's classmates residing together in Walsh. Junior 
year is also a time when many BC students choose to study 
abroad during the spring semester. This means saying good-bye 
to friends and the BC campus for many months. 

Aside from students' physical whereabouts, Juniors are also 
challenged with a tough academic year. This is the year when 
people declare majors and begin to think about life after 
graduation. Students weigh the pros and cons of graduate school 
vs. getting a job. This means that people may have to study for 
grad school entrance exams and increase their daily stress levels. 

Junior year is a very hectic and busy year, but it is not without 
its fun times. The off campus social scene thrives with an 
abundance of late night parties. Juniors also begin to turn 
twenty-one and have the option of going to various local pubs 
and bars. On the brink of entering their final year at BC, the class 
of 1999 has a bright and exciting year ahead. 



Amy L. Snyder '98 



s* mrmci' . * 




162 Juniors 





1 hese guys get ready for a night 
out with friends. 

Halloween was all about having 
a good time when these Juniors 
decided to dress up as Gilligan, 
Ginger and MaryAnne. 



Juniors 163 



C lass of 1 



nr. 



X he class of 1998 has seen many changes and has lived 
through many exciting times here at the Heights. It is the last 
class to have seen a BC football victory vs. Notre Dame and to 
have vivid memories of rushing the field. It is a class that saw a 
change in leadership at BC with the departure of Father Monan 
and the arrival of Father Leahy. It is a class that has seen its peers, 
as well as the college, grow and change over the years. 

If you ask twenty Boston College seniors to describe their 
time at the Heights you would get twenty completely different 
answers. Members of the class of 1998 have had four years to 
acquire many memories, each of them precious and unique. 
From spring breaks and football Saturdays to countless parties 
and finals weeks, these are the times that come to mind when 
looking back at one's college career. 

Current seniors have gone from living in small freshman 
rooms to off campus apartments, residence hall suites, or a mod. 
They are eligible to hold social gatherings on campus and are 
welcome at mod parties. It seems as if "their time" has finally 
come. They are now of age to frequent such classic establishments 
as Mary Ann's and The Kells, which welcome BC students with 
open arms. Seniors have hopefully gone from "undecided" or 
"undeclared" to concentrations within their respective schools 
of interest. 

For better or for worse, four years spent at Boston College 
has most likely changed the class of 1998. Hard work and 
dedication leads to the fulfillment of aspirations and goals. 
College is often referred to as "the best years of your life" and BC 
is the place where memories of great friends, fun times, and 
unbelievable experiences are made. 



Amy L. Snyder '98 



tTt 



77 



8 



164 beniors 






Uuring the past four years at 
BC, many seniors have grown to 
love the Eagle. 

1 hese guys prove that great 
friendships develop during one's 
college years. 

Otudents take a time out from 
partying to pose for a group shot. 

DC seniors have a great sense of 
school spirit, shown here by these 
students at a football game. 



Seniors 165 



WWfoifl for a living 



Deing employed while a student is not easy. Though it does 
not mean a life of drudgery, it is something else that many 
students have to fit into their already hectic schedules. For many, 
however, working has more benefits than drawbacks. Working 
is away to incorporate adult responsibilites into one's academically 
focused life. More importantly, having a part-time job is a way 
to earn some cash for all those nights out in downtown Boston. 

Many students at Boston College are employed in some 
fashion, and many of these jobs are on campus. From working 
in the library to making sandwiches in the Eagle's Nest, there is 
always an opportunity for work on campus. If one prefers to 
work in an office setting, the many departments and administrative 
aspects of BC are always looking for work-study students. 
Whether it is at the Office of University Housing's Work Order 
Center, or at The Plex, a campus job is convenient and gives a 
little extra pocket money. 

Internships offers students a taste of the real world before they 
graduate and are forced to enter the workplace. In some cases, 
students earn credit while working to secure their future 
employment after graduation. An internship extends a special 
kind of experience to the student and enables him/her to 
experience the working world. Possibilites for internships are 
endless. Living near Boston, there is a wealth of companies who 
love BC students and all the good work they do. Some of these 
internships are paid and some are unpaid, but they are all 
valuable ways to gain insight into a career path. 



Melissa M. McGann '98 



166 'Working 





ices on campus, such as the 
Registrar's office, are run with the 
help of student employees. 

1 he reserve desk in O'Neil 
Library is staffed by BC students. 

Doston College Cable channels 
are run by student employees, 
such as this one who is making 
sure movies and programming 
run smoothly. 



Working 167 



Resident 
Assistants 



Ti 



he residence halls at Boston College are home to many 
students. Resident Assistants, better known as RA's help make 
these residence halls a safe, fun place for the BC community. 
These people are our friends, peers, and classmates and play an 
important role in the University Housing at BC. 

RA's go through an extensive screening process and training 
sessions in order to learn how to be the best at what they do. They 
give their time to form a support system on which BC students 
can rely at virtually any time of the day or night. Whenever the 
residence halls are open, there is an RA on duty. This includes 
Thanksgiving, Spring Break, and Easter. RA's are on duty at 
least one night per week, from 7:00 PM until 7:00 AM. During 
this time they must go on rounds until 1 :00 AM and make sure 
that everything is okay. They also give up many weekends in 
order to monitor their building and make sure that everyone is 
safe and abiding by the Office of University Housing's rules. 

RA's plan programs, both social and educational, to promote 
the personal development of students. Whether it is a trip to 
Fenway Park, The Museum of Fine Arts, or simply sponsoring 
a movie night, RA's help bring the residential community closer. 



Amy L. Snyder '98 




168 Resident Assistants 






Amy L. Snyder 

In Walsh Hall, RA's are 
available to help their fellow 
students by answering questions 
and offering assistance. 

/\n RA in the Mods takes time 
to speak with a student while on 
duty. 

The 1997-1998 Resident 
Assistants. 

KA's in Edmond's Hall bond 
with students and with each 
other. 



Resident Assistants 169 



I esuit Tradition 



Be 



Boston College is not defined as simply a Catholic 
university, but more specifically as a Jesuit institution. Being 
Jesuit means having a commitment to serving the community, 
being open minded, and promoting justice and spirituality. 
Jesuit tradition also dictates a strong belief in education. These 
values, carried out by the Jesuit community, faculty, and students, 
define Boston College as one of the nation's top Catholic 
universities. 

Boston College is home to the largest collective Jesuit 
population in the country. The Jesuit community makes its 
presence known on campus in various ways. Whether it is 
serving as a Jesuit-in-residence living in a dorm, teaching a class, 
or giving Sunday Mass, the Jesuit priests of Boston College are 
an important part of students' lives. 

The Jesuit commitment to service is carried out by students 
through volunteer programs, such as trips to Belize, Jamaica, and 
Mexico to help the less fortunate. Students can also get involved 
in other service organizations such as the Christian Fellowship, 
Liturgy groups, and The Salt and Light Company. Another 
tribute to the Jesuit tradition is the attendance of weekly and 
daily Mass by students, and the active role of those who are 
Eucharistic Ministers and Lectors. 

The Jesuit spirit at Boston College gives students an 
understanding of what service, justice, and spirituality is all 
about. Through this experience, BC graduates enter the world 
with a unique perspective on what it means to take an active role 
in their community. Amy L. Snyder '98 




Elena K. Viz vary 



170 Jesuit Tradition 








$* 




J\ cross hanging over a doorway 
is a common display of Jesuit 
tradition around campus. 

rather Leahy, the Jesuit 
president of BC - seen here 
walking across campus. 

Crosses were erected in the quad 
to commemorate the Jesuits 
killed in El Salvador. 

Ot. Mary's Hall is home to the 
many resident Jesuits here at 
Boston College. 



Jesuit Tradition 171 



Celebrate 



ilolidays are celebrated in many ways by Boston College 
students, faculty, and staff throughout the year. From Marathon 
Monday parties to Christmas dances, the Boston College 
community takes every opportunity to honor all holidays. 

When students return to school in September, the smell of 
Labor Day barbecues welcome them back. Mods and residence 
hall backyards are filled with students playing a game of football, 
socializing with friends, or simply relaxing before the semester 
officially begins. As the autumn air sets in and the weather begins 
to turn colder, many holiday festivities move indoors. Halloween 
costume parties are a common way to spend this spooky night. 
Some students may even decide to try their luck trick-or-treating 
in the surrounding neighborhoods. 

As the fall semester begins to wind down, Thanksgiving and 
the busy Christmas season is upon us. Many Boston College 
students participate in charities, such as food and toy drives for 
needy families. This time of year brings Christmas parties, 
holiday songs, and of course, the annual tree-lighting ceremony 
on O'Neill plaza. Many students take time out from finals to 
exchange gifts with friends and maybe even watch holiday 
classics on television (who can resist watching Rudolph or the 
Grinch!?). In addition to all of these activities, many of the 
classes hold semi-formal dances at clubs or hotels in downtown 
Boston. 

In the spring semester, Valentine's Day is a day to spend with 
a special someone, or a time to send a gift to a long-distance 
friend. On St. Patrick's Day BC students are given the chance 
to becomes Irish for a day by either watching Boston's St. 
Patrick's Day parade or drinking a green colored beverage in an 
Irish pub. To bring a close to the academic year and enjoy the 
spring weather in Boston, Patriot's Day is a time to line up along 
Commonwealth Avenue and watch the running of the Boston 
Marathon. Grills are dusted off after a long winter and another 
barbecue season begins. 

Holidays are a time to celebrate joyous occasions and reflect 
on the purpose behind the festivities. The Boston College 
community embraces the chance to celebrate all holidays and 
does so with great enthusiasm. 

Amy L. Snyder '98 



17Z Jiolidays 





WW 

hStcw 

JsmMm 





Kern' Girvin 




1 he beginning of the holiday 
season is traditionally marked by 
the lighting of the O'Neill Plaza 



/\ "turkey" cake was the perfect 
addition to these students' 
Thanksgiving celebration. 

JVlany BC students enjoy dressing 
for Halloween in various creative 
costumes. 

Oanta Claus didn't forget to stop 
at Boston College this year to 
drop off a few presents. 



holidays 173 



Extracurricular 
Education 



B< 



)oston College offers many worthwhile educational 
activities outside the traditional setting of the classroom. 
Students have the opportunity to take classes in addition to 
their regular course load. Dance classes, self defense classes, 
musical instruction, and martial arts are just some of the 
possibilities. Activities such as these offer students the chance 
to broaden their horizons and to do something that they're 
interested in. 

These classes are sometimes offered for an entire semester or 
for a few weeks. Some classes need to be registered for and 
others have open-enrollment status. For example, free tennis 
lessons and aerobics classes are given at the Plex throughout the 
semester to anyone who chooses to attend. 

Extracurricular activities are designed to better meet students' 
needs and interests. They offer a great way to learn about 
something new. They may be formal or informal, serious or 
just for fun. From karate to ballroom dancing, the extracurricular 
programs at Boston College are open to all students and offer 
a unique and fun way to learn. 



Amy L. Snyder '98 




174 Extracurricular 





Dallroom dancing is a popular 
Monday night activity. 

students practice and 
choreograph a show for a South 
Asian Student Association Event. 

1 hese students learn self-defense 
in the R.A.D. program. 

/vrtistic Expression with fans 
and cultural dress is shown here 
in this extracurricular activity. 



Extracurricular 175 




Our Guest 






ELach year at Boston College, various celebrities, scholars, 
musicians, and politicians come to campus. These individuals 
share their knowledge, their songs, and/or their expertise with 
the university's students and staff. 

This year, the highlight of the UGBC sponsored concert 
events was the performance of the rock group The Wallflowers. 
On Monday, December 1, 1997, the band entertained a filled 
Conte Forum with their well-known melodies. 

Other memorable celebrities to speak at Boston College 
included famous movie director Oliver Stone, Governor Paul 
Cellucci, and political figure Pat Buchanan. These individuals 
shared their thoughts with interested members of the BC 
community. 

If given the chance, students are usually eager to listen to the 
countless number of guest performers and speakers and take 
advantage of yet another great opportunity at the Heights. 



176 Terformers & Speakers 




w 







JEW. 



f€C 




«..:.'■,:•■',"■■:.•■■■■■ 







Jacob Dylan and The Wallflow- 
ers rocked Conte Forum during 
this year's UGBC sponsored 
concert. 

IVlassachussetts Governor Paul 
Cellucci spoke to students and 
faculty. 

Oliver Stone conveyed his movie- 
making brilliance when he visited 
Boston College. 

1 at Buchanan emphasizing his 
point. 



Terformers & Speakers 177 



Tjetlt Snow. . . 



178 Snow 




W hen it gets dark at 4:00 in the afternoon and the wind chill 
is 20 below outside, many students may wonder why they chose 
to go to school in Boston and not in sunny Florida - or better yet, 
somewhere in the Carribean! 

The truth is that many Boston College students love the 
northeast and wouldn't have it any other way. The cold weather 
is sometimes a burden - especially when you have to worry about 
where to put your heavy coat when you go out. But along with 
the cold comes SNOW!! This makes it all worthwhile. Snowball 
fights, building snowmen, and going ice skating or skiing help 
us relieve stress and have some good, old-fashioned fun. When 
the forecast calls for some of that white fluffy stuff, many of us 
revert back to our childhood behaviors of hoping classes are 
cancelled so we can go sledding. 

Aside from all the fun to be had when it snows in Boston, BC 
students also get to enjoy the natural beauty that a snowfall 
bestows on Boston College's campus. The falling flakes create 
a calm, quiet atmosphere for everyone to experience. Trees 
glisten and glimmer. The grounds are blanketed with white and 
are transformed into a winter wonderland. 

When it snows in Boston, students should take advantage of 
the sights, sounds, and of course, the snowball fights. As you 
look back on all of this, you will be glad that you chose to go to 
school in Boston. 



1 *, 

5'* ^ 






\ 







*. 



p 




t. 





Ot. Ignacious church is 
surrounded by newly fallen snow. 

1 hese friends don't mind the 
cold and enjoy the snowfall. 

After a snowfall, the Dustbowl is 
lined with glistening trees. 

W hat better way to enjoy the 
snow than to have a snow fight 
with friends at 4:00 AM. 



i£ 



if' 



Snow 179 



Batriots Day 



1 atriot's Day, it is that Massachusetts holiday that BC 
students have come to know and love. It is a day when classes 
are canceled, Commonwealth Avenue is shut down, and grills 
are dusted off for yet another tailgate. This Monday in April 
is fondly called "Marathon Monday," to signify the running 
of the Boston Marathon. Boston College is alive with 
excitement as people line up on Commonwealth Avenue to 
claim their spot on the curb. The race, which passes by 
Boston College's campus is a great way to be part of Patriot's 
Day excitement in Boston. 

Boston College students celebrate this holiday in many 
different ways. Some choose to spend a beautiful day outside, 
sitting in the sun and watching marathon runners go by. 
Giving hi-fives to weary runners after they have just made it 
up "heartbreak hill" is something that enthusiastic spectators 
enjoy doing for hours at a time. The race gets really interesting 
after all the leaders have gone by and the race is long since over. 
At this time, people in anything from togas to clown suits run 
by. Then there are those runners who are wearing BC 
clothing, whom the crowd roots on in full force. 

Some BC students also run in the race. Running in the race, 
however, is a relative term. There are students who train and 
register for the 26 mile race, and then there are those that 
decide to "jump in" and run trom the main gate all the way to 
South Street on a dare. 

No matter how BC students observe Patriot's Day,they all 
look forward to the excitment of this three day weekend. It 
is a way to celebrate spring, our country's independence, and 
being at Boston College, as some of the greatest runners in the 
world pass by our campus. 



Amy L. Snyder '98 













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180 Tatriot'sDay 




r ans enthusiastically cheet for 
the Boston Marathon truck as a 
sign that the leading runners are 
close behind. 



Wheelchair racers set the pace 
early and pass by an excited BC 
crowd alongside Commonwealth 
Avenue. 

r ive BC students take a break 
from the day's festivities to pose 
for a picture along the marathon 
route. 

articipants in the race receive 
cheers and encouragement from 
the crowded sidelines. 



"Patriot's Day 181 



■ 




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iv 



"!iii 



S P O R T l S 

1 Spirit and Tride I 





fPspect; 



hether one is an athlete or a 
pectator, the sports programs 
are an integral facet of life at 
Boston College. The unity of 
the student body can be seen 
and heard from the beginning 
of fall through the end of spring. 
Sports are an outlet for the school 
spirit that is built by the entirety 
of the Heights, but can only be 
expressed on the field or in the 
stands. 




ections 



Editor - Jyoti Mahapatra 



Spirit and Tride J83 





Jl 



V 





ms. 




FUMBLED AMBITIONS 



by Jim Gruber 



The football team finished 
4-7 under first-year Head Coach 
Tom O'Brien. 

The Eagles generated the 
most excitement early in the 
season by jumping out to a 2-1 
record and sharing 1 st place in 
the Big East conference. 

After a shocking loss to 
Temple, the team came back to 
grab its biggest win, a 31-24 
comeback victory over West 
Virginia. 

The following week, Mike 
Cloud scored four touchdowns 
in the 35-21 win over Big East 
rival Rutgers on the road. 

The team then went on a 
five-game losing streak, losing 
in the fourth quarter to 
Cincinnati before getting 
trounced at home by Georgia 
Tech. They played well at 
Virginia Tech before falling to 
the Hokies 17-3, then played 
an unforgettable loss to Miami. 

The Hurricanes pulled out 
to a 24-3 lead, but BC slowly 
climbed back into the game. A 
31-31 tie forced the first 
overtime game ever played at 



Alumni Stadium. 

In overtime, Omari Walker 
scored two touchdowns, but the 
game was lost after failing to 
score on a controversial two- 
point conversion try. 

The team followed that 
tough loss with a brutal 
trouncing at Notre Dame in 
Holy War VI. The Eagles fell 
behind early on their way to a 
52-20 loss. 

The last home game ended 
the season on a high note with 
a 24-20 win over Army. 
Thestudent body came out in 
full force for the seniors' last 
game, filling the upper-deck 
behind the end zone with topless 
fans in the fourth quarter and 
rushing the field at the end for 

The Eagles were led by a 
trio of seniors: Hasselbeck, 
Walker, and Tri-Captain Erik 
Storz. Hasselbeck threw for 
over 250 yards in four different 
games. Walker closed in on the 
all-time BC touchdown scoring 
record late in the season, and 
Storz led the nation in sacks. 




Elena Vizvary 



football 185 




Melissa Cody 



Doston College fans didn't mind 
"Cloudy days" when they btought 
home a victory. Junior running 
back Mike Cloud rushed an 
impressive 211 yards during the 
West Virginia game. The 31-24 
win was highlighted by a 66-yard 
touchdown in the second half. This 
major BIG EAST upset placed 
Cloud in a well-deserved spotlight 
for the remainder of the season. 
Cloud also scored four touchdowns 
for the Eagles in their win against 
Rutgers, making him the eigth 
player in BC football history to 
score four times in one game. 



•all 





OPPONENT SCORE 



Temple 

West Virginia 

Rutgers 

Cincinnati 

Georgia Tech 

Virginia Tech 

Miami 

Notre Dame 

Pittsburgh 

Syracuse 

Army 



L 21-28 

W 31-24 

W 35-21 

L6-24 

L 14-42 
L7-17 

L 44-45 

L 20-52 
W 22-21 

L 13-20 
W 24-20 



I he Boston College and 
Miami front lines go 
head to head in battle. 
The close BC loss of 44- 
45 in double-overtime 
stirred up the most 
intense crowd spirit 
seen all season. 

Uuarterback, senior 
Matt Hasselbeck dodges 
his West Virgina 
opponents. Hasselbeck 
made two touchdown 
passes that generated 
the momentum needed 
to overcome the 
Mountaineer's 14- 
point lead. In addition, 
he was the recipient of 
the Scanlan Award 
along with running 
back Omari Walker. 



football 187 



This Page 

Deniors Joe Aleardi, Pete 
Spaulding, and Chris Murray 
sail in boats numbered 1, 2, 
and 3, respectively. Numbers 
are assigned to team members 
according to their ranking on 
the team. 

Denior Anne Bohlen takes a 
break from practice. Bohlen 
placed 6 th in the nation at the 
ICYRA Women's Single 
Nationals in October. 

Opposite Page 

ICYRA Ail-American Senior 
Pete Spauling checks his sail 
with crew member Megan 
Aleardi. 



H lone boat sails along the 
Mystic River at sunset. The 
Mystic was one of several 
practice sites for the team. 



OPPONENT SCORE 



= 


Anderson Trophy 
Women's Invite 


6 th 

2 nd 


cc 


Cptn. Hurst Bowl 


4* 




Man-Labs 


7 th 


cac 


Mrs. Hurst Bowl 


2 nd 




Hatch Brown 


1 st 


fiQ 


Hood Trophy 
Olymp. Trophy 
NE W. Singles 


7 th 

8 th 
4* 


Lkl 


Denmark Trophy 
NE Singles 
Intersectional 


nth 


fie 


Moore Trophy 




« 


Navy Fall 

NE Sloops 

W. Intersectional 




u 


ICYRA W. Nat'ls 




1*1 


Schell Trophy 
ICYRA S. Nat'ls 




188 Sailing 







TRIUMPHANT NAVIGATIONS 



byjyoti Mabapatra 



The Women's and Co-ed 
Sailing teams secured 
prestigious national positions 
this season. The Women's team 
was ranked 2 nd in the nation, 
while the Co-ed team captured 
13 d1 place. 

Senior Anne Bohlen took the 
6 th spot at the Intercollegiate 
Yacht Racing Association 
(ICYRA) Women's Single 
Nationals in October, and 
Senior Pete Spaulding placed 
well at the ICYRA Men's Single 
Nationals in November. 
Spaulding also made the ICYRA 
All-American Sailing Team for 
the second year in his collegiate 
career. This achievement made 
him the first Boston College 
sailor to earn the honor in 50 
years. Seniors Chris Murray 
and Jen Rovegno were also 
selected for the team . 

Despite such honorable 



achievements, the team had to 
overcome many obstacles. For 
example, their boats were 
purchased from MIT, having 
been already used for 1 8 years. 

In addition to old equipment, 
practice was often moved from 
one location to another, 
requiring the transport of the 
team's sailboats. 

Nevertheless, BC boasts one 
of the largest sailing team rosters 
in the nation, with over 45 
members. 35 freshmen alone 
tried out for six open spots on 
the team. 

Junior Mik Bjorkenstam 
commended Senior Captains 
Joe Aleardi and Sarah Skeie as 
well as Spaulding and Murray 
for turning the team into one of 
national prominence. "They 
have done wonders for this 
team"commented Bjorkenstam. 



Sailing 189 







* 








BIG EAST CHAMPS 



by Jackie Baselice 
and Jyoti Mahapatra 



The Women's Field Hockey 
Team has had a stellar year. 
The dedication and talent of all 
the players allowed them to win 
the Big East Championships 
and attain a spot in the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association 
national tournament. 

En route to their victory, the 
team had to defeat powerhouses 
like Providence and 
Connecticut. Having lost to 
these schools earlier in the 
season, Head Coach Sherren 
Granese attributed their win to 
the team's work ethic. 

"They deserved to win the 
game because of how hard they 
worked. We played as a team." 

SeniorTri-Captain Andrea 
Durko added, "We're just on a 
roll. I've never played on a team 
that jelled so much and has 
played so well together." 

Playing well was an 
understatement, considering 
how far the team had to go to 
win the Big East Championship 
title. 

Suffering losses to Maryland 
and UMass in the beginning of 
the season, the women had to 
keep their drive at a level high 
enough to carry them into 
upcoming games. 



However, the rewards made 
their effort very worthwhile. 
Bringing home three overtime 
victories, the team proved that 
perseverance pays off. 

The culmination of the 
season was, no doubt, the Big 
East Championships. Under 
an unrelenting downpour of 
rain, the Lady Eagles' spirits 
were not dampened. Despite 
the soaking conditions, the team 
captured a 2-0 lead over UConn 
that remained until the end of 
the game. 

Durko was awarded Most 
Valuable Player of the game, 
while Junior Tri-Captain Joy 
Ramsbotham was named 1997 
Field Hockey Defensive Player 
of the Year. 

Tri-Captain Junior Anne 
Marie Ambros was invited to 
the first team All-Big East, while 
Senior Marion Fitzgerald 
earned second team honors. 

The spectacular season was 
especially memorable to seniors 
Durko, Fitzgerald, and 
Gabrielle Birg. Having been 
the Big East Champions their 
freshman year, this season's 
successes completed a cycle of 
victory. 



field Jiockey 191 




forward Andrea Durko blocks a Friar 
opponent's attempt to steal the ball. 
Durko was appointed to First team 
along with Joy Ramsbotham and 
Anne Marie Ambros, making Boston 
College the Division I school with 
the greatest number of players holding 
First team honors. 




ield liockey 



Photo Courtesy of Sports Informa 



1 st Row (1-r): E.BettaA.Durko,N.Novocin,K.Gentile,L.Roth,N.Bukowski,A.M.Ambros 
2" d Row: Head Coach Sherren Granese,S.FilipJ.Marrone,K.Misiaszek,K.Medville, 
M.Fitzgerald,M. Brady Assistant Coach Donna Lee 3 rd Row: Assistant Coach Meg 
HaggartyJ.DedmanJ.Cornwell.G.Bieg, J.RamsbothamJ.HallA.Suchanek,S.Chicaski 




OPPONENT SCORE OPPONENT SCORE 



CO 



SW.Miss State 


¥5-1 


UConn 


LO-1 


LaSalle 


W5-0 


Stanford 


W2-1 


Amherst 


LO-3 


Harvard 


L2-3 


Maryland 


Ll-6 


William & Mary 


W4-3 


BU 


W3-2 


Wake Forest 


W3-2 


Villanova 


W2-0 


UNH 


W4-0 


Northeastern 


LO-2 


Rutgers 


W4-1 


Holy Cross 


Wl-0 


Cornell 




Providence 


L2-3 


BIG EAST 




Syracuse 


Wl-0 


Semifinals 


W2-0 


Rhode Island 


W5-0 


Championship 


W2-0 


Duke 


W4-2 


NCAA Champs 


L2-3 



Melissa Cody 




This Page 

wenior Forward Gabrielle Bieg 
maintains control of the ball against 
a Providence opponent. The team 
suffered a 2-3 loss to Providence, 
but was redeemed when they beat 
the Friars during the BIG EAST 
Championship Semifinals. 

wenior Tri-Captain Marion 
Fitzgerald makes her way down the 
field at Alumni Stadium. Fitzgerald 
posted a career goal point total of 
78, the highest of anyone on the 



field jockey 193 




This Page 

Junior midfielder Kiera McKeon 
makes a goal attempt. McKeon 
started every game this season. 

Opposite Page 

freshman forward Rachael 
Klemanski keeps an eye out for 
competition. Klemanski 
contributed goals to the wins over 
Central Connecticut and 
Providence. 

Senior Co-Captain Alex 
Chamberlain heads up an attack 
against her Pittsburgh opponents. 
Chamberlain ended her BC career 
with a points total of 20 and earned 
NEWISA All- New England second 
team honors. 



OPPONENT 


SCORE 


OPPONENT 


SCORE 


West Virginia 


LO-1 


Notre Dame 


LO-2 


Central Conn. 


¥3-0 


Boston U. 


¥1-0 


Georgetown 


¥2-1 


Pittsburgh 


¥2-0 


UConn 


LO-3 


Seton Hall 


L0-1 


Providence 


¥1-0 


UNH 


TO-0 


Harvard 


Tl-1 


Rutgers 


¥2-1 


St.John's 


¥2-1 


Villanova 


L0-1 


Syracuse 


LO-1 


Brown 


¥1-0 


Loyala-Chicago 


¥3-0 








i: ? 4 IVomen's Soccer 



ON THE BALL 




by Sarah Stiglmeier 



The Women's Soccer team had 
a positive season, ending with a 
9-6-2 record overall and 5-6 in 
the Big East. 

Despite their successful 
results, the team did not obtain 
a coveted championship 
invitation. The team faced some 
tough opponents, which made 
for an up-and-down season. 

The women's two big losses 
came from the nationally ranked 
University of Connecticut and 
Big East rival Villanova. 
However, they chalked up many 
big wins, including a sudden 
death, double overtime victory 
against Providence College. 

The team ended the season 
on a positive note by shutting 
out Brown 1-0. All of the 
matches combined to be an 
opportunity to learn what they 
were made of, and they proved 
that they could stand up to 
tough competition. 



Senior Co-Captains Alex 
Chamberlain and Anne 
Schneider were the only 
upperclassmen on the team. 
The season showed promise for 
the younger players, including 
year-round solid goal-keeping 
by freshman Courtney 
Schaeffer and strong midfield 
play by freshman Katherine 
Murphy. 

The team's scoring leader was 
sophomore Mary Guarino. 
Guarino boasted six goal 
attempts in the intense victory 
against the Providence Friars. 

The season also inaugurated 
Head Coach Alison Foley's first 
year at Boston College. Foley 
transferred over from a head 
coaching position at Angelo 
State. Before that, Foley was 
the assistant coach for the 
women's soccer team at James 
Madison from 1992-1996. 




l^RBBBBOHMBBeHHRHBRB 



I 



1 st row (1-r): Slyva, A. Schneider, A. Chamberlain, D. D'AIessandro, J.Collein, 

Pellagius, S. Powell 2 nd Row K. Wright, J. Livolsi, M. Rueckel.B. Manza, S. Glecos, 

K. Forgiano, K. McKeon, M. Burns 3 rd Row M. Guarino, R. Klemanski.L. Cofran, 

C. Schaeffer, A. Lehne, Sakorski, K. Murphy, G. Goldberg, Asst. Coach David 

Kulik, Head Coach Alison Foley , 

Women s boccer 195 




This Page 

Oenior Darby Rice closes in on a 
Brown opponent. Rice placed 5 th 
in the meet against UNH and 
Maine. 



Opposite Page 

Oenior Ann Baldelli and 
Sophomore Shannon Smith lead 
the pack. Baldelli and Smith 
finished 2 nd and 3 rd , respectively, at 
the Vermont season opener. 

Oenior Angie Graham attempts to 
pass a Dartmouth competitor at 
the New England Championships. 
Graham captured the 1 st place title 
at the meet, beating 260 other 



OPPONENT SCORE OPPONENT SCORE 



Vermont W15-49 NE Champs 

UNH/Maine W20-41-73 BIG EASTChamps 
Griak Invite 4th NCAA Districts 

NCAA Champs 



O) 



'Women's Cross Country 




PAVING THE ROAD 




by Sarah Stiglmeier 



The Women's Cross 
Country Team, led by Head 
Coach Randy Thomas, had 
an impressive season. The 
ream placed 2 nd in the 23 rd 
Annual New England 
Championships. At this meet, 
Senior Angie Graham finished 
with a remarkable time of 
16:43 that won her the 1 st 
place title. 

At the dual meet against 
Vermont, the Lady Eagles 
scored a perfect 1 5 and brought 
home the top six spots. 
Sophomore Kyla Barbour took 
1 st place, followed by seniors 
Jodie Lake, Ann Baldelli, 
sophomore Shannon Smith, 
senior Darby Rice, and 
freshman Sandy Wells from 
Ontario, Canada. 

At the meet against UNH 
and Maine, Lake captured first 
place, followed by Baldelli, 
Smith, and sophomore Amy 
Smith. 

The team also fared well at 



the Roy Griak Invitational, held 
in Minnesota. They placed 4 th 
out of approximately 25 teams. 
This crucial meet allowed the 
runners to evaluate themselves 
against athletes from around the 
country. 

Prior to the BIG EAST 
Championships, the Women's 
team was ranked 15 th in the 
nation. They came away from 
the meet with a 3 rd place finish 
and turned their attention to 
the NCAA District 1 Qualifier. 
Graham gave a stellar 
performance, placing 1 st out of 
191 runners. Smith took 5 th 
place, also capturing a spot at 
the NCAA Championships, 
held in November. 

At the Championships, 
Graham finished 3 rd and earned 
her first Ail-American status. 
Smith finished 17 th . The 
womens' performances resulted 
in a 9 th out of 22 teams finish for 
BC , the best finish in the team's 
eight NCAA appearances. 




Photo Courtesy or iports into:! 



1st row (1-r): KAndrews,K.Barbour,B.Fleming,D.Rice,E.Schlomer, 
A. Smith, N.Esposito.L.McIsaac, Coach K.Franey 2nd row: Coach 
J.AdamsJ.I^e,S.WeUs,A.Phears,S.SmifhA.Mahoney,K.WhiteA.Graham,Head 
Coach Randy Thomas Not Pictured: M.Dwyer,M.GaymanA.Baldelli 

"Women's Cross Country 197 



HEAD OF THE CLASS 



by Jackie Baselice 



The Men's Soccer team has had 
an astounding season, capturing 
a slot in the Big East 
Championships. What is most 
amazing about this feat is that 
seven of the team's 18 players 
are freshman. 

Head Coach Ed Kelly was 
extremely excited by the team's 
qualification for the league 
championships. Although 
getting a good draw was 
important for the event, 
winning was not the only thing 
on Kelly's mind. 

"The important thing is we 
got in. We're a young team. 
This way the team gets more 
experience. It gives them 
something to look forward to at 
the end of the season". 



The underclassmen were 
integral to the team's success 
because of many injuries to 
front-line atheletes as well as to 
graduating seniors. 

Kelly commented on the age 
of his players, saying "The team 
is young, but there are many 
bright spots". 

Some of those bright spots 
included Freshman Forward 
Kevin Boyd. He led the team in 
scoring, making 5 of the 8 goals 
for the Eagles. 

Freshman goalkeeper Chris 
Hamblin was also a valuable 
addition to the team's defense. 
He made 66 of the 71 saves 
during the regular season prior 
to the match against Notre 
Dame. 



OPPONENT SCORE OPPONENT SCORE 



Hartford 


LO-1 


UConn 


L0-3 


Providence 


W2-0 


BU 


Wl-0 


Seton Hall 


LO-2 


Brown 


LO-1 


Georgetown 


LO-1 


W.Virginia 


Wl-0 


Harvard 


T 1-1 


Rutgers 


LO-2 


Pittsburgh 


TO-0 


Villanova 


Wl-0 


St.John's 


LO-2 


Notre Dame 


Ll-3 


Syracuse 


W2-0 








^jnjT^fjni 




This Page 

Junior Captain midfielder Keith 
McDonald maintains control of 
the ball against a Villanova 
opponent. McDonald also scored 
the game-winning goal against 
Boston University. 

Opposite Page 

wenior midfielder Asgeir 
Asgeirsson concentrates on keeping 
possession of the ball. Asgeirsson 
led the team with 37 shots for the 
season, and accumulated 1 5 goals 
during his Boston College soccer 
career. 

wenior Matt Dunn takes 
advantage of a rare moment when 
he is not under attack from 
competitors. Dunn made the 
single goal that brought home a 
victory for the Eagles in their bout 
against Harvard. 



Men's Soccer 199 



LEAVING TRACKS 



by Sarah Stiglmeier 



This year the Men's Cross 
Country team showed a lot of 
promise under Head Coach 
Randy Thomas and Captain 
Pete Simons. At the 8 5 th Annual 
New England Cross Country 
Championships they placed 3 rd 
out of 36 teams from the area 
with a score of 118. 

Freshman sensation Justin 
Burdon achieved the team's best 
time, clocking in at a 
commendable 24:34. 

At the first meet of the season, 
a dual meet against Vermont, 
the Eagles swept the top seven 
places in the race. Sophomore 
Marshal Armitage led the team 
with a time of 25:42. Nextwere 
Burdon, sophomore Derek 
Holland, freshman Derek 



Smith, and junior Brian Shafer, 
all of whom were only two 
seconds behind Armitage. The 
6 th and 7 th spots were taken by 
junior Chris Merrill and 
freshman Paul Abruzzese, 
respectively. 

The top five runners on the 
varsity team are made up of all 
underclassmen, allowing for "A 
very bright future," according 
to Armitage. The team placed 
5 th at the BIG EAST 
Championships held in New 
York City. The men then went 
on to the NCAA Disrict 1 
Qualifying meet, where Smith 
placed 23 rd , giving the team a 
7 th place finish. 




lstrow(l-r): M.Fonnemann,B.MurrayJ.Deplitch,P.Simons,B.Alan,A.Shafer 
2nd row: B.ShaferJ.Burdon,P.Abruzzese,F.Klemovitch,R.O'Brien,R.Cooper 
3rd row: Coach K.Franey,D. Meyers, D.Smith,J.O'Conner,E.Shaughnessy, 
'".Dunn, W.Attwood, Head Coach Randy Thomas 4th row: 
.Merrii!,D.Holland,D.Fitzgerald Not Pictured: J.QuintanillaJ.Duggan 

'■ ' Ad-n's Cross Country 





OPPONENT SCORE OPPONENT SCORS 



Vermont 


W15-50 


NE Champs 


3rd 


UNH/UConn/ 


W32-38- 


BIG EASTChamps 


5th 


Bates 


67-97 


NCAA Districts 


7th 


Griak Invite 


12th 







This Page 

bophomores Derek Holland and 
Marshal Armitage make their way 
past the pack at the New England 
Championships, where the team 
placed 3 rd out of 36 teams. 

Junior Chris Merril races to 
maintain a lead. Merril placed 1 th 
at the Franklin Park meet against 
UNH, Maine, and Bates College. 

Opposite Page 

freshman Justin Burdon keeps his 
distance ahead of Tufts and UNH 
opponents. Despite this being his 
first year at BC, Burdon ran the 
fastest time for the Eagles ar the 
New England Championships held 
in October. 



^Meris Cross Country ZOl 






This Page 

Junior 2M Eric Malzone maintains 
possesion of the ball. Malzone was 
tied with sophomote Mike Pietsch 
fot a team high of 1 1 8 positive 
impact points this season. 

Senior Co-Captain Goalie Tom 
Rea blocks an attempted goal shot. 
Rea held a season total of 1 04 saves. 

Opposite Page 

Oophomore 2M Chris Sheehan 
anticipates an opponent attack. 

Oenior Ilian Rashtanov monitors 
his teammates' control of the ball. 
Rashtanov achieved a 43 shot 
percentage during the season. 



a OPPONENT 


SCORE 


St. Francis 


L8-19 


— Fordham 


W13-8 


U.S. Marine 


W23-4 


MIT 


W 13-10 


J Navy 


L 19-20 


Navy 


L7-19 


Princeton 


L9-13 


3 Ohio State 


Wll-9 


UMass 


L4-11 


Harvard 


W 11-7 


Q MIT 


L9-10 


Brown 


L7-10 


Harvard 


W13-6 


UMass 


L 10-17 


Lehman 


W5-0 


g Iona 


W 18-15 


Queens 


L8-15 


Occidental 


W14-6 


3 Chapman 


Wll-9 


Redlands 


W7-6 


LMU 


L5-14 


3 UMass 


L5-13 


Harvard 


L4-11 


MIT 


L7-11 


2 Water Tola 






Marc Sama) 



MAKING AN IMPAfc 



^ — — 




M& 



^ihhm "j»w 



by Kevin Fleck 











The Men's Water Polo team 
had a great season, finishing 
with a 12-13 record. This 
reflected the most wins the team 
has had in the past six years. In 
addition, the men broke six 
single-season records and beat 
arch-rival Harvard in two out 
of three matches. 

The team was led by Head 
Coach G.T. Ladd, Senior Co- 
Captains Brian Galdorisi and 
Tom Rea, and all but two players 
returned from last year's squad. 

Collectively, the team broke 
six records this season. 
Sophomore 2-meter man Nader 
Massarweh played 93 quarters, 
breaking a team record, while 
Mike Pietsch, a sophomore 
driver, scored nine two-point 
goals. 

Other records established 
included Junior 2 meter-man 
Eric Malzone's 77 steals, Senior 



driverTrevorBoehms blocking 
of seven field shots, and lastly 
Pietsch's 37 ejections. Goalie 
Rea also made a new record in 
overall saves, with a .502 
percentage of attempted scores 
stopped. 

Perhaps the biggest thrill for 
the team was their two wins 
over Harvard, having never 
before beaten the Crimson. 
"This win gave our team a much 
needed boost, and some 
momentum," Malzone said 
following their second Harvard 
victory in October. 

The team's third loss to the 
Crimson came in the second 
round of the College Water Polo 
Association Championships. 
They finished eighth in the 
conference overall. 




Photo Courtesy of Snorts Information 



1 st Row (1-r): N.Lander, W.Estes,M.Barth,S.O'Connell,M.Pecrich,B.O : NeiI 
2 nd Row: M.Pietsch,N.Massarweh,E.Malzone,S.Foley,C.Sheehan, 
T.Gallagher.T.Rea. 3 rd Row: T.Boeham,B.Galdorisi,B.Angeli,C.J.I augharn, 
S.Szejner,I.RashtanovJ.D.Hong,P.Hennessy,E.Fitzpatrick,Head Coach 
G.T.Ladd Not pictured: D.Van Wagner 

Water Volo Z03 



DIGGING DEEP 



by Kevin Fleck 



The Women's Volleyball 
team came into the season with 
high hopes. Nadine Lilavois, 
returning as Head Coach for 
her sixth season, recruited 
aggressively in the off-season 
and brought seven talented 
freshmen to the team. The 
players were led by Senior Co- 
Captain Julia Gallacher, a 
returning captain, and Junior 
Co-Captain Courtney Grubb. 

"We will be able to move 
players around depending on 
what we need for a particular 
match in terms of strategy," said 
Lilavois in the pre-season. "Our 
bench will be much more 
talented and deeper than it has 
been in the past." 

Unfortunately, the Eagles 
faced a very competitive 
schedule, having a record of 7- 



20 following their win over 
Central Connecticut. Despite 
having a record of 1 -5 in the Big 
East, the Eagles did bring in key 
victories over competitive teams 
such as Holy Cross, Yale, and 
Colgate. 

Many players on the team 
showed impressive skills on the 
court this season. Freshman 
Julia El-Hag, an outside hitter, 
earned Rookie of the Week 
honors in the Big East early in 
October by posting 1 5 kills and 
12 digs in a 3-2 victory over 
Rutgers. El-Hag also held a 
team high 17 kills and eight 
digs in a loss to Seton Hall. 
This record was beat by El-Hag 
and senior outside hitter Amy 
Laurence in BC's victory over 
Central Connecticut, who each 
posted 1 8 kills. 




rhoto Courtesy or Sports Information 



1 st Row (1-r): N.Gingras,C.Oswalt,M.BlaickALaurence,K.Tortorello, 
N.Eskay,S.Berry,C.Grubb 2 nd Row: Assistant Coach Christopher Ridolfi, 
Trainer Alexandra Ladd,C.Carpenter,L.DeLong,K.Sprinkel,N. Scott, 
i : 'uchholz,E.Broderick,J.GallacherJ. El-Hag, Head Coach Nadine Lilavois 

Z04- Volleyball 








CO 



OPPONEHT 


SCORE 


OPPONENT 


SCORE 


Florida State 


LO-3 


UConn 


LO-3 


Purdue 


LO-3 


Harvard 


LO-3 


Mississippi 


Ll-3 


Dartmouth 


Ll-3 


Northeastern 


Ll-3 


Northeastern 


Ll-3 


Auburn 


LO-3 


Sienna 


W3-0 


RJiode Island 


LO-3 


Rutgers 


W3-2 


UNH 


L2-3 


Seton Hall 


LO-3 


Harvard 


W3-1 


Notre Dame 


Ll-3 


Holy Cross 


W3-0 


Syracuse 


LO-3 


Colgate 


W3-0 


Fairfield 


Ll-3 


Brown 


LO-3 


Providence 


LO-3 


Idaho 


LO-3 


Yale 


W3-2 





Melissa Cody 




This Page 

Denior Natalie Scott calls a shot 
during a game. Along with 
Scott, the team graduated Julia 
Gallagher, Laurence, and 
Broderick. 

Opposite Page 

freshman Julia El-Hag and 
Senior Amy Laurence anticipate 
a return while Senior Eileen 
Broderick positions herself for 
back-up. 



Melissa Cody 



Volleyball Z05 



"WEAREBC" 



by Maureen Torpey 



Led by Captains Ellen 
Jackman and Steve Giordano, 
the Cheerleading team 
practiced as much as any other 
athletic team on campus. 

Every Tuesday and 
Thursday they held formal 
practices, working on sideline 
cheers, partner stunting, and 
the pyramids that they always 
managed to make look so easy. 

Wednesdays were more 
informal, without their coach 
and devoted mainly to partner 
stunting. In addition to these 
practices, the team had a group 
lifting session once a week. All 
of this practice paid off at 
football and basketball games 
when the fans were able to enjoy 
the team's finished routine. 

Another purpose for 
practices was the Nationals 
competition, which were held 
in April at Dayton Beach in 



Florida. This was the first trip 
for the team since 1993. The 
cheerleaders were confident that 
they had the talent and resources 
to make the trip. Not only did 
the twelve Varsity squad 
members travel to Nationals, 
but also the eight most 
promising Junior Varsity team 
members attended. 

The cheerleaders were found 
not only at games, but in other 
places around the community. 
They held several pep rallies at 
away games, and for the past 
couple of years, they have 
travelled to Tuksberry. There, 
the team participated in an 
exhibition for youth football 
cheerleaders in the area. 

Reaching out to the 
community, the cheerleaders 
exemplify the attributes of 
Boston College. 




■rry Girvin 



ading Z06 





This Page 

I he squad kicks up school spirit 
during a football game in Alumni 
Stadium. 

Opposite Page 

Junior Kefryn Black, sophomore 
Robbie Bubalo, and sophomore Pat 
Jackson perform at a football game. 

Practice makes perfect.. .the team 
displays the results of months of 
practice at a fall pep rally held on 
Lower Campus. 

Junior Kibibi Bord-Nelson leads a 
cheer on a cold autumn 'afternoon. 



Cheerleading Z07 



COURTING VICTORY 



by Pete Gerken 



There were a lot of high 
expectations coming into the 
Women's Tennis fall season. 
The team returned five out of 
their nine players. This 
experienced group combined 
with a couple of talented 
freshmen resulted in a very 
successful season. 

Leading the way on the courts 
was freshman phenom Cynthia 
Tow. She posted a 1 2-6 record 
in singles matches. However, 
Tow was not the only newcomer 
on the team who was an 
immediate impact player. Kiren 
Fernando, the team's number 
four player, won 1 out of her 
1 8 matches in the fall. 

Veterans Barbara Privel and 
Mercedes del Valle also 
contributed heavily to the team. 
Both players picked up 1 1 
singles victories in the fall season. 



Del Valle was also a vital force 
in thewomen's victory over Yale 
in September. 

The strongest doubles team 
was the combination of 
Sophomore Kimberly Arbuckle 
and Senior Co-Captain 
Christina Malone. Their best 
tournament was the Sunity 
Invitational. The talented duo 
qualified for the finals before 
dropping to the team from the 
University of Virginia. 

The women anticipated that 
their strong fall finish would 
propel them to new heights 
come spring. The combination 
of veteran leadership by Co- 
Captains Malone and Senior 
Kara Swanson, along with del 
Valle and Privrel, and the rising 
young talent provided for some 
great excitement on the Plex 
tennis courts this year. 




Photo Courtesy of Sports Information 



(1-r): M.del Valle, B. Privrel, K.Swanson,C.Malone,Head Coach Mark Burns, 
K.Arbuckle,K.Fernando,A.Niznik,C.Tow 




Z08 'Women' s Tennis 




OPPONENT SCORE 



Yale 


W6-3 


Brown 


W6-3 


Dartmouth 


W5-3 


Cornell 


W5-1 


Harvard 


L2-5 


Dartmouth 


L2-5 


Princeton 


W5-4 



This Page 

Dophomore Barbara Privrel makes a serve at the Plex courts. Privel 
was the team's top-ranked player and ended her fall season with an 1 1 - 
9 record. 

Opposite Page 

freshman Kiren Fernando returns a serve. Fernando was named 
'Athlete of the Week' in November along with her doubles partner, 
Cynthia Tow. 



Elena K. Vizvary 



~W omen's Tennis Z09 



NET RETURNS 



by Michael Picone 



The Men's Tennis team 
ended its fall season 3-2, despite 
having only one senior on the 
toster. 

They men possessed a blend 
of veterans and talented 
newcomers. SophomoreAnand 
Annigeri headed up the list of 
veterans this season. Also back 
were Sophomore Nikolas Smith 
and Junior Chris Amundsen. 
Senior Captain John Brennan 
led the team at the number four 
position. 

Amundsen has had more 
collegiate tennis experience than 
any other Boston College 
athelete, competing in 105 
matches in the past two years, 
50 of which were singles and 55 
doubles. 

The team began the season 
against Boston University. BC 
was soundly defeated 7-0 in their 
first match of the year. The 
only bright spot was a victory at 
exhibition doubles by Brennan 
and Freshman Chris Johnson. 



The next match was against 
Connecticut, where the team 
played well to gain a 5-2 victory. 
The third game of the season 
was against New Hampshire. 
The men did not have any 
trouble with UNH, defeating 
them 7-0. 

A more formidable challenge 
presented itself when the Eagles 
played UMass. The match came 
down to the wire, with UMass 
winning 4-2. A pivotal game 
was Brennan's loss in a third set 
tie-breaker that would have 
given the team a victory. 

The final match of the season 
was against Fairfield, which the 
team defeated 7-0. 

The three newcomers to the 
team -Jason Cowett, Ki-Chang 
Kim, and Johnson, contributed 
greatly to the successful fall 
season. The team hoped to fare 
equally well in the spring. 




Photo Courtesy of Sports Information 



1997 Men's Tennis Team 

1 st Row (1-r): C. Amundseu, J. Cowett, K.C. Kim 

2 nd Row: Head Coach Nigel Bentley, A. Annigeri, N. Smith, J. Brennan, 

D. Swanstrom, C. Johnson, Assistant Coach Bruce Pierce 

110 Men's Tennis 




OPPONENT SCORE 



BU 


LO-7 


UConn 


W5-2 


UNH 


¥7-0 


UMass 


L2-4 


Fairfield 


W7-0 





Elena K-Vizvary 



This Page 

Denior John Brennan returns a volley. Brennan was the captain and only senior on the 
squad- 
Opposite Page 

Dophomore Chris Amundsen concentrates on his form during a return. Amundsen was 
recognized on the team for his substantial court experience. 



Men's Tennis Zll 



IN SYNC 



by Courtney Cappa 



Little is known about how 
hard the Men's and Women's 
Crew teams work to maintain 
their reputations as one of the 
most formidable club sports on 
the east coast. 

Led by Head Coach Dave 
O'Neill and Senior Captains 
Kate Tytus, Rich Ewing, and 
Tom Cahill, the team posted a 
successful year. 

The varsity women's team 
had three eight-man boats 
manned by some of the most 
determined atheletes at Boston 
College. There was an entire 
boat full of four-year rowers, 
the most the team has ever had. 

The women placed first in 
the Head of the Textile against 
29 other boats, and placed 
second in the MIT Invitational 
out of 1 5 boats. They also won 
the New England 

Championships (NE Champs) 
and medaled at the Champion 



International Collegiate Regatta 
(CICR). 

While the women were 
experienced, the men's varsity 
heavyweight squad was fairly 
young. Captain Ewing was the 
only senior on the team. 

However, the men were a 
powerful group who looked 
forward to a successful spring 
season. The team gave a great 
performance at the NE Champs 
and hoped to improve in the 
spring competition as well. 

The varsity lightweight team 
was headed up by Cahill and 
also boasted a strong fall season, 
taking the gold at the NE 
Champs and CICR. 

For a club sport founded only 
one decade ago, the crew team 
truly demonstrated a solid 
competitive attitude and team 
spirit. 





_ Elena K.Vizvary 

■ he Women's Varsity Eight shows a strong perfotmance at the Head of the 
Chatles Regatta. 



HZ crew 





jo* 



Elena K-Vizvary 



Crew 213 




Elena K.Vizvaiy 



■ he Men's Varsity Eight glides along at the Head of the Charles Regatta. 



urew 




Crew Z15 



FIERCE COMPETITORS 



by Sarah Stiglmeier 



The Women's Rugby team 
had a very successful season with 
an undefeated regular season 
record of 5-0. 

Under the leadership of 
Senior Captain Joanne Liu and 
Vice-Captain Jen Sliva, the 
women outscored their 
opponents 140-22 in five 
games, beating difficult teams 
such as Yale and Amherst 
College. 

The women traveled to the 
New England Championships 
(NE Champs) and finished 
fourth out of 60 teams. The 
starting team consisted of eight 
seniors, three juniors, and five 
sophomores. 



The Men's team, on the other 
hand, endured a tough season 
with an overall record of 1-6. 
However, the record didn't 
reflect the strengths of the team, 
which consisted of over 60 men 
under Senior Captain Brent 
Bell. 

The season included several 
close defeats - four games were 
lost by less than seven points. 
The team was led by three key 
senior players: Brent Bell, Tim 
Weeks, and Matt Perry. They 
all made significant 
contributions and defined an 
excellent standard of play for 
the underclassmen. 




Elena K.Vizvary 

1 st row (1-r): C. Hughes, K. Vinick, K. Warren, L. Saltsgiver, J. Sliva, J. Liu, 

J. Welter, G. Endo 2 ad row: A. Northam, E. Villasenor, E. Sullivan, 

P. Mahoney, D. Rood, I. Suchecki, J. Keane 

Seniors not pictured: N. Benz, J. Houlihan, J. Thompson 




Xugby 116 




This Page 

Denior Izabela Sucheki races her 
opponent down the field. 

he women's team engages in a 
scrum. 

Opposite Page 

member of the women's team 
flies above her competitors to 
maintain possession of the ball. 



Sarah Wolke 



Xugby Z17 



IRON WILLPOWER 



by Mark Cautela 



Both the Men's and 
Women's Golf teams had a fall 
season filled with promise and 
some great individual 
performances. 

The women's team was 
spectacular, finishing in the top 
five in three of five fall 
tournaments. Their worst was 
only a 1 th place finish at the 
tough ECAC Championships. 
Head Coach Natalie Galligan 
had a bright future with this 
year's team, which had only one 
senior, Rhodera Freyvogel. 

The leader of the women's 
team was junior Katie Shields. 
She had four top-three finishes, 
including two tournaments that 
she won outright. Besides 
taking 1st place in the Yale and 
Mount Holyoke Invitationals, 
Shields finished 2 nd at the 
ECAC Championships in a 
clutch performance. 

Also performing well for the 
women were sophomores Jackie 
Shea and Tina Haydu, and 



junior Katie Hart as well as 
freshman Meghan Donoghue. 

The men's team had a little 
tougher year, but was able to 
put together a good team effort. 
The highlight of the fall season 
was their 4 th place finish at the 
Toski Invitational. Overall the 
team placed in the top ten in 
five of their six tournaments. 
The last meet of the year was 
also impressive as the men 
captured 10th place out of 45 
teams. 

Junior Sean Lim was the top 
golfer for the men. He held the 
team's best score four times this 
season and his best finish was 
8 th at the Black Knight Fall 
Classic. 

Sophomore Patrick Dunn 
was the team's top representative 
at the Yale Invitational and the 
Big East Championships, where 
he finished 12 th . Senior Ian 
Rogan also tied with Dunn at 
the BE Champs. 




Al! Photos Courtesy of Sports Information 





OPPONENT SCORE 



WOMEN 




Dartmouth 


5 th /12 


Yale 


7 th / 14 


Mt.Holyoke 


2 nd / 12 


Rutgers 


5^/10 


ECAC Champs 


10 th /! 6 


MEN 




Yale 


19^/32 


Black Knight 


8 th / 15 


BIG EAST Champs 7^/9 


Toski Invite 


4*/26 


ECAC Champs 


lOW 


NEIGA Champs 


10 ch /45 



: l ■ 



This Page 



Junior Katie Shields concentrates on a putt. Shields had an excellent season, 
medaling at two of her five tournaments. 

Junior Sean Lim sets up for a putt. Lim's best tournament was at the Black 
Knight Fall Classic held at West Point, where he tied for eighth place. 

Opposite Page 

freshman Doug Albers maintains form during practice. Albers competed at all 
fall tournaments except the Yale Invitational 

Golf 119 



WEIGHTED GAINS 



by Pete Gerken 



It's been a tough season for the 
Men's Wrestling team. 
Although their results have not 
been impressive, this has not 
stopped a few individuals from 
excelling on the mats. 

The men competed in two 
team invitationals and a plethora 
of duals meets in their season. 
Their first team competition 
was the Kutztown University 
Tournament in late November. 
The Eagles finished tenth out 
of 1 1 teams in the event. 

Giving solid performances 
for the Eagles were Junior John 
Breslin, Sophomore Jeff Finley, 
and Freshman Oriste Uku 
Benje. Breslin won two matches 
in the 118-pound division. 
Finley and Uku Benje each won 
two matches in the 1 67-pound 
division. 

A week earlier the Eagles 
took part in the East 
Stroudsburg University 
Tournament. Only a few BC 
wrestlers took part in this event. 



Leading the way was Junior Joe 
Dwyer, Finley and Sophomore 
Pat Purcell. Dwyer won three 
out of five matches in the 150- 
pound division. Finley won 
two out of three matches and 
Purcell, who wrestled in the 
190-pound division, was 
victorious in two out of four 
matches. 

The Eagles had a tough time 
in dual meets this season. As of 
January 20 th they held a record 
of 1-7. Their only victory 
came on January 10 th against 
Kutztown University. BC won 
with a score of 27-20. 

As of January 20 th , Purcell 
led the team with an individual 
record of 9-8. Second on the 
team in victories was Junior 
Matt Mckliney, who wrestled 
in the 126 LB division. So far he 
held a record of 8- 1 1 . McKinley 
at one point during the season 
had won seven straight matches, 
and Breslin is third on the team 
with seven wins. 





OPPONENT SCORE 



otos t_ourcesy c 



10 "Wrestling. 



West Point 


NTS 


East Strous. 


NTS 


Kutztown 


10 th / 11 


Coast Guard 


6 th /8 


Wilkes 




Hofstra 


L 12-37 


Buffalo 


LO-46 


Kutztown 


W 27-20 


Army 


L6-45 


Harvard 


L6-41 


Drexel 


L6-47 


Bucknell 


L0-46 


Seton Hall 


LO-43 


East Strous. 




Plymouth 




Wilkes 




Wagner 




Lowell 




BU 







This Page 

H member of the team competes 
at the Seton Hall meet. 

H team member cheers on his 
fellow wrestlers. 

Opposite Page 

Head Coach Rod Buttry stands at 
attention during the team's 
competition at Bucknell. 

H BC wrestler and his opponent 
battle for victory. 



Wrestling 221 



EN GUARD 



by Lori Lefevre 



Both the Boston College Men's 
and Women's swimming teams 
enjoyed considerable success in 
the water this year, with key 
victories over longtime rivals 
and by coming together as a 
group. 

"We've done better coming 
together as a group, as a team", 
said Traver Boehm, senior 
captain of the men's team. "It's 
a really tight group". He pointed 
to a win over BIG EAST rival 
Providence and a strong 
showing at the Harvard 
Invitational in December, 
where many of the men achieved 
their best individual times, as 
highlights of their season. He 
added that the second half was 
tougher, as they faced more 
competitive teams. 

Similarly, coach Tom 
Groden commented on the 
strength of the women's team. 
"This is one of the best teams 



/ 



we've had, and looking at it 
strictly from that standpoint, 
we're very deep throughout our 
events", Groden said. 

Senior Maggie Villamana 
shared her coach's sentiment. 
"We're having a great season", 
Villamana said, adding that the 
team "is stronger than last year" . 
Villamana pointed to the 
women's victory over rival 
Boston University as a highlight 
of their season. The victory 
gave the Eagles their third 
straightvictory over the Terriers. 
Before that, the women's team 
had been unable to defeat BU 
for 17 years. Villamana credited 
the contributions of sophomore 
Kendra Johnson and junior Sara 
Guerena with that win. 

On the men's side, the team 
has excelled particularly in the 
sprint events and sprint relays. 




Melissa C 



ZZZ 'Women's fencing 




This Page 

Toil fencer Kate Guernsey, a senior, lunges to score a touch. 

H member of the team makes an attack on her opponent. 
Opposite Page 

Denior epee fencer Mary Keefe scores a touch moments 
before her oppent touches her. 



Melissa Cody 



"Women's fencing 223 



FOILPROOF 



by Lori Lefevre 



Both the Boston College Men's 
and Women's swimming teams 
enjoyed considerable success in 
the water this year, with key 
victories over longtime rivals 
and by coming together as a 
group. 

"We've done better coming 
together as a group, as a team", 
said Traver Boehm, senior 
captain of the men's team. "It's 
areallytightgroup". Hepointed 
to a win over BIG EAST rival 
Providence and a strong 
showing at the Harvard 
Invitational in December, 
where many of the men achieved 
their best individual times, as 
highlights of their season. He 
added that the second half was 
tougher, as they faced more 
competitive teams. 

Similarly, coach Tom 
Groden commented on the 
strength of the women's team. 
"This is one of the best teams 



we've had, and looking at it 
strictly from that standpoint, 
we're very deep throughout our 
events", Groden said. 

Senior Maggie Villamana 
shared her coach's sentiment. 
"We're having a great season", 
Villamana said, adding that the 
team "is stronger than lastyear". 
Villamana pointed to the 
women's victory over rival 
Boston University as a highlight 
of their season. The victory 
gave the Eagles their third 
straight victory over the Terriers. 
Before that, the women's team 
had been unable to defeat BU 
for 17 years. Villamana credited 
the contributions of sophomore 
Kendra Johnson and junior Sara 
Guerena with that win. 

On the men's side, the team 
has excelled particularly in the 
sprint events and sprint relays. 




fencing 



This Page 

Denior Haj Matsukata moves in for a touch with his 
weapon, the sabre. 

H fencer competes at a meet held in the Plex. 

Opposite Page 

wenior foil fencer Michael Pawlik perries his opponents 
attack with his weapon. 




Men's fencing 225 




!Zo r 'ken's Basketball 







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Women's Basketball ZZ7 



by Pete Gerken 



. This was the season that the 
Women's Basketball Head 
Coach Cathy Inglese had been 
waiting fot. 

Five years ago, she came to 
Boston College after a very 
successful stint at the University 
ofVermont. Her first three years 
at BC were tough. Finally in 
1 996-97, things started to go in 
the right direction for the Eagles, 
who finished with a record of 
18-10. 

BC had alot to be optimistic 
about entering this season. The 
only lost two players from last 
year's squad due to graduation. 
Leading the Eagles on the court 
was Sophomore guard Cal 
Bouchard. 

Bouchard and the Eagles 
started the season off with a 
blast, winning three straight 
games. The highlight of the 
three game winning streak was 
a 82-68 win over the University 
of Texas, who was ranked #25 
in the nation at the time. It was 
only the second time in BC's 
history that they had beaten a 
nationally ranked opponent. 
Bouchard had the game of her 
life that day at the Fleet Center, 
as she poured in a career high 
32 points. 

As the season progressed, the 
Eagles kept improving. 
Bouchard was not the only Eagle 
putting forth an outstanding 
effort. Junior center Whitney 
Steele became a force under the 
basket. She had a couple of 
games in which she scored more 
than 20 points and was the 
team's leading rebounder. 



Also playing big roles were the 
two Seniors on the squad, co- 
captains Kim Beezer and Amiee 
McGuire. Beezer helped the 
team with her all out hustle, 
never giving less than 1 1 0% on 
the floor. McGuire was the 
spiritual leader of the team and 
added some good outside 
shooting. 

The real surprise for the 
Eagles this season has been 
Sophomore Alissa Murphy, 
who provided some great 
scoring and passing off the 
bench. Other key players were 
Paula Basco, Allison Booth, and 
Jamie Cournoyer. 

The Eagles struggled a bit 
during the holiday season, losing 
a couple of close games to 
Alabama, Miami, and 
Villanova. They regrouped after 
the loss to Miami with two key 
back to back victories over 
Rutgers and Notre Dame. In 
both games Bouchard hit a 
couple of big shots down the 
stretch to steal the victories. 

With an average of 72.7 
points per game and leading the 
nation with a three-point field 
goal percentage of .426 as of 
February, BC has made a 
tremendous turnaround in the 
last couple of years. They have 
gone from a rebuildingprogram 
to one with a legitimate shot of 
gaining an invitation to the 
NCAA tournament in March. 




Elena K. Vizvar 



This Page 

wenior Kim Beezer guards a Pittsburgh opponent. Beezer's multiple 
rebounds contributed to the Eagles' victories over Yale and St.John's, 
during which the women won with a commendable 20 point lead. 

Opposite Page 

wophomore sensation Cal Bouchard dribbles down the court, followed 
by teammate Whitney Steele. Bouchard's highest scoring game, as of 
January, was against Texas, where she accumulated 32 points. 

Denior Guard Aimee McGuire makes her way down the court. 



'Women's Basketball 




Elena K. Vizvary 



OPPONENT SCORE 

Marist W 1 04-60 

Texas W 82-68 

Towson V7 82-53 

Georgia Tech L 79-81 

Georgetown W 70-60 

W.Virginia W 64-45 

Holy Cross L 68-80 

Hartford W 73-47 

Alabama L 70-79 

Yale W 58-38 

St.John's W 74-54 

Villanova L 49-50 

Providence W 94-73 

Miami L 79-85 

Rutgers W 74-65 

ND W 78-76 

^ Pittsburgh W 75-64 

UConn L 53-86 

Villanova L 35-48 

^^ Providence 
Georgetown 
Seton Hall 

G3 W.Virginia 
Rutgers 
St.John's 

CO BIG EAST Tourny 




Women's Basketball ZZ9 



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Men's Basketball Z31 



by Brian Barrio 



Al Skinner had his work cut 
out for him as he began his first 
season as coach of the men's 
basketball team. 

But with a squad featuring 
only seven scholarship players 
and facing a schedule that 
included defending NCAA 
champion Arizona, Skinner 
and his charges didn't quit. 

Instead BC served up 
some exciting basketball 
behind the scrappy play of 
senior tri-captains Mickey 
Curley, Antonio Granger, and 
Duane Woodward. 

Highlights for this 
overachieving squad included 
road wins over archrival 
Providence and 24th ranked 
Marquette, as well as a 74-63 
triumph over Georgetown in 
Conte Forum. 

More amazing than the wins, 
though, was the fact that they 
came from a team that was only 
eight men deep. 

Individually, 1997-98 saw 
Woodward and Granger each 
score their 1,000th points 
while junior Kostas Maglos 
electrified the Eagle faithful 
with his thunderous dunks. 



The lack of scholarship 
players was a plus in some ways, 
chief among them the 
emergence of walk-on point 
guard Dwayne Pina. 

Pina, a 5-9 fan favorite, 
impressed his teammates and 
fans with his ever-improving 
game and a endless supply of 
hustle that belied diminutive 
stature. 

This years team didn't win 
the Big East title or make the 
NCAA Tournament, but in a 
season when success couldn't 
be measured in wins and 
losses, they were champions in 
the hearts of BC fans on 
the Heights and beyond. 



ZSZ Men's Basketball 





O OPPONENT 


SCORE 


Central Conn. 


W 87-54 


Florida Ad. 


W71-53 


Qg Arizona 


L 69-99 


GW 


L 64-76 


Chaminade 


W 81-72 


^^ Providence 


W 78-62 


Fordham 


W 69-66 


Syracuse 
__ Fairfield 


L 52-70 
W 77-65 


^^ UMass 


L 57-65 


Holy Cross 


W 69-54 


Northwestern 


W 64-63 


BH Villanova 


L 76-83 


West Virginia 


L 57-79 


Villanova 


L 65-68 


l*J UConn 


L 68-80 


Rutgers 


W 69-62 


Marquette 
QC Providence 


W 64-54 
L 54-58 


Seton Hall 


W 64-61 


Miami 


L 57-67 


^■% Georgetown 


W 74-63 


St.John's 


L 79-91 


Pittsburgh 


L 89-79 


ND 


L 75-72 


^"^ Rutgers 




St.John's 




Georgetown 




w* West Virginia 




This Page 




Oenior Guard and forward Antonio 
Granger dunks the ball over his 
Providence College opponent. The 
game was one of many in which 
Granger led the team in points 
scored. 



Denior Guard Duane Woodward 
with teammate Jonathan Beerbohm 
works the court at Conte Forum. 
Woodward was a tri-captain with 
Curley and Granger. 

Opposite Page 

wenior Tri-Captain Mickey Curley 
shoots from the foul line. During 
the George Washington game 
Curley led the team with 25 points 
and 9 rebounds. 

Junior Forward Kostas Maglos 
works for the Eagles during tip-off. 
Maglos averaged 11.2 points a game 
as of the team's second battle against 
Providence. 



Men's Basketball 233 










CA 




VMHM 



Women's Tfockey 235 



Denior Forward Ryan MacLeod 
faces off a Minnesota opponent. 
MacLeod racked up three goals, 
also known as a 'hat-trick', during 
the 13-2 victory game over RPI. 

freshman Forward Kathleen 
Savino battles a Minnesota 
competitor. Savino was one of the 
many freshman on the team this 
year. 




Melissa Cc 



CO 



OPPONENT 


SCORE 


OPPONENT 


SCORE 


Providence 


L2-8 


St.Lawrence 


¥4-3 


Brown 


L 1-11 


Cornell 


L2-8 


Northeastern 


Ll-10 


Bowdoin 




Harvard 


Ll-3 


St.Lawrence 




Dartmouth 


L3-8 


Cornell 




Dartmouth 


L4-6 


Harvard 




Wesleyan 


¥6-1 


Gustavus 




Middlebury 


Ll-5 


UNH 




Dartmouth 


LO-8 


Colby 




Northeastern 


LO-8 


Yale 




UNH 


LO-8 


Princeton 




Colby 


L4-5 


Northeastern 




RPI 


W13-2 


Harvard 




Yale 


T2-2 


Bowdoin 




Princeton 


L2-6 


Providence 




Minnesota 


L3-4 


Brown 






Melissa Coi 



?omeri s J{ockey 



by Pete Gerken 




Melissa Cody 




It has been a long season for 
the Women's Hockey team. 
Despite their strong efforts on 
the ice at the AJ Kelley rink, the 
Eagles came up on the bottom 
end of most of their contests. 

Out of the 21 players on the 
roster more than half were 
underclassmen. This made 
winning right away a bit tough 
with such a young team. With 
each game the women improved 
and got a little more experience 
under their belt. 

The Eagles had a rough start 
to their season campaign. They 
lost their first six games before 
breaking through against 
Wesleyan College. BC beat 
Wesleyan with a score of 6-1. 
Leading the Eagles to victory 
were Senior Forward Ryan 
MacLeod and Freshman 
Forward Kathleen Savino. Both 
players netted two goals each 
against Wesleyan. The other 
two goals were scored by Junior 
Forward Erin Magee and 
Freshman Jennifer Buckley. 
The winning goaltender was 
Sophomore Laura Dickman, 
who only allowed one goal and 
saved 38 shots in aiding the 
team to pick up their first victory 
of the season. 



This Page 



Unfortunately the Eagles 
were not able to build on their 
success at Wesleyan in the games 
that followed. The women then 
fell into another losing streak. 
They lost five in a row before 
sticking it to RPI by the score of 
13-2, picking up their second 
victory of the season. In this 
game three BC players achieved 
a hat-trick by scoring three goals 
each. The three players were 
Buckley, MacLeod and Junior 
Defenseman Genevieve 
Missirlian. Sophomore Christy 
Nentwig was the winning 
goalie, allowing two goals and 
saving 1 9 shots. 

The team followed the win 
against RPI with a tie against 
Yale. They lost the 
next two games to Princeton, 
and the University of 
Minnesota. This time the 
Eagles were able to stop the 
losing streak at just two when 
they beat St.Lawrence four to 
three. The star of this s game 
was Buckley, who had three 
goals. The other goal was added 
by Missirilian and the winner 
goalie was Nentwig. At this 
point in the season Buckley led 
the team with a total of 22 
points. 



Freshman Forward Jennifer 
Buckley races for control of the 
puck. Buckey led the team in overall 
points with 22 as of the Cornell 
game. 

Junior Erin Magee and Sophomore 
Gena Nolin fight off an attempted 
goal while Junior Genevieve 
Missirlian and Sophomore Laura 
Dickman guard the net. 



Melissa Cody 




'Women's Jiockey Z37 




238 Men s Jiockey 




Men's Jiockey Z3P 



O OPPONENT 


SCORE 


Ottawa 


W10-0 


BGSU 


W3-2 


ND 


W3-2 


*^" Merrimack 


L4-6 


Amherst 


W3-1 


UNH 


V/6-4 


UNH 
^"* Northeastern 


W4-1 


W5-2 


Northeastern 


L4-5 


Harvard 


W4-3 


^^ Maine 


W6-1 


Maine 


L5-12 


Brown 


V/6-3 


St.Lawrence 


W6-0 


0^^ Clarkson 
BU 


L3-4 
Ll-5 


BU 


T3-3 


N.Michigan 


L2-3 


Uj Harvard 


T6-6 


BU 


W4-2 


Maine 


TO-0 


Providence 


W6-0 


QC Providence 


W8-0 


Amherst 


W6-3 


UNH 


L3-9 


Lowell 


W4-3 


C9 Harvard 


L 4-5 


Providence 




BU 




Merrimack 




Ssr Merrimack 




Lowell 




Lowell 




Northeastern 




240 Men's Jiockey 






^4* 




by Brian Barrio 




Melissa Cody 




Following the matriculation 
of three straight top-ten 
recruiting classes, the men's 
hockey team had high 
expectations heading into the 
1998 season. 

Led by Junior captain Marty 
Reasoner, the Eagles were ranked 
nationally in the top ten for 
much of the season, and were a 
force in the tough Hockey East. 

Reasoner, along with 
defensive stalwart Mike Mottau 
and freshman netminder Scott 
Clemmensen, powered BC to 
numerous big wins, including a 
4-2 victory over Boston 
University in a standing room 
only Conte Forum and a 6-1 
drubbing of Maine earlier in the 
year. 

The success of the 1998 
campaign was tempered, 
however, by a painful loss to 
Harvard in the FleetCenter 
in February. 

Alas, even in a season when 
the cupboard was full, BC 
couldn't capture another 
Beanpot title. 

Leading 3-1 in the third 
period against Harvard, visions 



This Page 



ofa championship rematch with 
BU began dancing in the Eagles' 
heads. 

Soon enough, the Crimson 
had turned the deficit into a 5-4 
overtimewin, dashingBC's title 
hopes. 

But despite the 

disappointment of the Beanpot 
loss, the '98 campaign saw the 
Eagles return to their perch high 
in the national rankings, and 
head into the Hockey East and 
NCAA playoffs with great 
optimism. 



Melissa Cody 



Denior Assistant Captain Jamie 
O'Leary stands at attention, ready 
to accept a pass. O'Leary made the 
first score five minutes into the first 
Providence game of the season. This 
was the Eagles' third shutout game 
of the season. 

wenior Defenseman Ken 
Hemenway makes his way down 
the rink with the puck. 

Opposite Page 

Junior Forward Chris Masters 
battles a Providence opponent for 
the puck. Master's goal against the 
Friars contributed to the team 
bringing home a 6-0 victory. 

Junior Captain Marty Reasoner 
checks a Friar competitor. 
Reasoner's spirit was instrumental 
to keeping the Eagles' morale up 
during tough games. 



Mensjiockey Z41 



POOLED EFFORTS 



by Kevin Fleck 



Both the Boston College Men's 
and Women's swimming teams 
enjoyed considerable success in 
the water this year, with key 
victories over longtime rivals 
and by coming together as a 
group. 

"We've done better coming 
together as a group, as a team", 
said Traver Boehm, senior 
captain of the men's team. "It's 
a really tight group". He pointed 
to a win over BIG EAST rival 
Providence and a strong 
showing at the Harvard 
Invitational in December, 
where many of the men achieved 
their best individual times, as 
highlights of their season. He 
added that the second half was 
tougher, as they faced more 
competitive teams. 

Similarly, coach Tom 
Groden commented on the 
strength of the women's team. 
"This is one of the best teams 



we've had, and looking at it 
strictly from that standpoint, 
we're very deep throughout our 
events", Groden said. 

Senior Maggie Villamana 
shared her coach's sentiment. 
"We're having a great season", 
Villamana said, adding that the 
team " is stronger than last year" . 
Villamana pointed to the 
women's victory over rival 
Boston University as a highlight 
of their season. The victory 
gave the Eagles their third 
straight victory over the Terriers. 
Before that, the women's team 
had been unable to defeat BU 
for 17 years. Villamana credited 
the contributions of Sophomore 
Kendra Johnson and Junior Sara 
Guerena with that win. 

On the men's side, the team 
has excelled particularly in the 
sprint events and sprint relays. 




Photo Courtesy of Sports Information 



1 st Row (1-r): K.Gray, S.Lents, M.Smith, S.Helfrich, KO'Meara, S.Ferguson 

, M.Welch, R. Quebec, K.Johnson, K.Hoesing, M.Weston 

2 nd Row: E.Murphy, C. Griffith, J.Myer, M.Villamana, C.Montanaro, 

C.Blaston, II. Ford, K.Glynn, M.Pelletier 

3 rd Row: Head Coach Tom Groden, M. Farmer, L. Chancier, E.Allen, P.Foschi, 

P.Schoenhaus, K.Edsall, JM. Donahue, C.Kirk, S.Steckroth, S.Twal, Assistant 

Coach Meg Galli 

Not pictured: A.Gustafson, L.Bernini 




This Page 

wenior Tri-Captain Laurel Bernini competes in a backstroke event 
during a meet against the UConn Huskies. Bernini's co-captains 
included seniors Abby Gustafson and Carrie Kirk, who swam the 
individual medley and backstroke, respectively. 

Opposite Page 

Denior Michele Welch makes her way down a lane performing the 
freestyle. 

weniors Bernini and Samantha Briggs cheer on their teammates 
during a meet held at the Plex pool. Briggs competed in the breastroke 
events. 






242 "Women's Swimming 





OPPONENT 

Amherst 

W.Virginia 

UConn 

Fairfield 

Army 

UNH 

Rhode Island 

BU 

Springfield 

Maine 

Northeastern 

Central Conn. 

Providence 

BIG EAST 

Champs 

ECAC 

Champs 



SCORE 

W 204-96 
W 192-108 
L 106-193 
W 143-98 
W 188-112 
T 150-150 
W 189-106 
W 167-133 
W181-116 
W 169-129 
W150-149 
W 171-102 



Kerr)' Gii 



CO 



~Women's Swimming Z43 



OPPONENT SCORE 

Can-Am 6th 

Challenge 

Bridgewater W 187-110 

Niagra 

Providence W 134-108 

Fairfield W 148-79 

UNH L 130-168 



Z4A Swimming 



Holy Cross 

Rhode Island 

Springfield 

BU 

Maine 

Central Conn. 

Providence 

BIG EAST Champs 

ECAC Champs 



W 








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Photo Courtesy of Spotts Infotmation 



1 st row (1-r): M. Brescio, T. Lawler, F. Evans, T. Boehm, M. Wilt, J. Shapiro, 
M. Manganiello, J. Toumey, D. Santacroce 2 nd row: E. Fitzpatrick, K. Barton, 
S. Foley, J. Dempsey, R. Kiel, B. Wright, A. Burkhart, P. Callahan, A. 
O'Connor, W. Coakly 3 rd row: Head Coach Tom Groden, C Feichmeir, 
G. Dwyer, S. Yap, S. Holowicki, S. Szejner, B. Pike, M. Walsh, B. O'Neil, 
R. Foley, C. Murphy, J. Hartigan, R. MacTough, Assistant Coach Meg Galli 



Opposite Page 

r ike watches for his 
teammates during a 
meet held at the Plex 



H member of the team 
makes his way down 
the lane 



Elena K.Vizvaiy 



Swimming Z45 



SUMMIT VIEWS 



byjyoti Mahapatra 



The Men's and Women's 
Skiing team continued a 
tradition of expertise and victory 
this season. Under Head Coach 
Bill Toof, who completed his 
29 th year at the Heights, the 
team maintained their position 
as a powerhouse in the slalom 
and the giant slalom events. 

Among the women, Junior 
Amanda Daffer led the team in 
placing at competitions. She 
took second place in slalom at 
both the UMass-Amherst 
Carnival held in Charlemont, 
Massachusetts, and the Brown- 
UConn Carnival held at Loon 
Mountain in New Hampshire. 
Daffer also placed third in the 
giant slalom at the Plymouth 
State Carnival at Waterville 
Valley in New Hampshire. In 
addition. Daffer was honored 
for her efforts with the John 
Davidson Memorial Slalom 
Award at the Boston College 
Winter Carnival. She was no 
doubt a significant contributor 
to the women's success this 
season. 

Also adding achievement to 
the women was Senior Lucia 
Fankhanel. She placed ninth in 
the slalom and giant slalom at 
the UMass- Amherst Carnival 
and the Brown-UConn 
Carnival. 



The men's team graduated 
four members this year, 
including John Kim, Mike 
MacConnell, Gordie Megroz, 
and Rob Melnick. Kim led the 
team in titles, placing in the top 
five of every competition as of 
February 8 th . His best was at the 
first carnival of the season, where 
he took second place in both the 
slalom and giant slalom. At the 
same event, MacConnell placed 
fifth in the slalom. 

The men were able to 
consistently take second place 
at all competitions prior to the 
Smith College Carnival in 
February. They looked forward 
to winning future events, 
especially regional and national 
competitions. 




Melissa CodyJ 



Z46 Skiing 





Melissa Cody 



Members of the women's and mens team work on their form 
doring a morning practice. 



Skiing Z47 



COOL RUNNINGS 



byjyoti Mahapatra 



Boosted by upperclassmen, 
the Women's Track and Field 
team enjoyed a prosperous 
season. Competitive in both 
track and field events, the team 
was fortunately well-rounded. 

Senior Amy Stuyniski 
brought home three titles at the 
New England Challenge Cup 
held in February. She placed 
first in the long jump, second in 
the triple jump, and third in the 
55 meter dash. Senior Anya 
Mauer placed second in the high 
jump with a height of 5 feet, 6 
inches at the Harvard Open. 
Her performance qualified her 
for the ECAC meet. Junior 
Libby MacDonald took second 
place in the 3 5 -lb. shot at the 
New England Cup, throwing a 
distance of 13.99 meters. 
Freshman Kristin 

O'Brien became the first 
female pole vaulter for the 
Eagles, and broke her own 
record three times. With a 
height of 8 feet, 2 inches, 
O'Brien also qualified for the 
New England Champs. 



Six-time All-American 
Senior Angie Graham led the 
women in distance events, and 
was considered a contender for 
the mile at the NCAA 
Championships, according to 
Head Coach Randy Thomas. 
Senior Ann Baldelli's power in 
the same event afforded the team 
a strong nucleus in the mile. In 
addition, Graham excelled in 
the 800 meter run, winning 
first place at the NE Cup 
Challenge Championships. 

Underclassmen Kyla 

Barbour also added strength to 
the team with her successes in 
the 5K and mile runs. She 
finished fifth in the mile at the 
NE Cup, lengthening the long 
list of titles the women's team 
held. Barbour was but one 
example of the great potential 
of the women to achieve 
victories this season in NCAA 
competitions. 




This Page 

M member of the team practices the pole vault. This was the first year 
that BC competed in the women's pole vault field event. 

Opposite Page 

H member of the women's team practices the high jump. 



Z4S Women' sTrack 





Melissa Cody 



Women's Track 249 



GREAT EXPECTATIONS 



by Jyoti Mahapatra 



Although the Men's Track 
and Field Team chalked up this 
season to a rebuilding year, it 
also produced some outstanding 
individual achievements. The 
young team as a whole used the 
season to gain experience, but a 
few of the men went on to 
achieve great successes. 

In field events, for example, 
Sophomore George White 
dominated the long jump. His 
second longest jump in BC 
history. As of the Harvard Open 
dual meet in February, White's 
best for this season was 24 feet 
and 8 1/2 inches. A 
commendable performance in 
itself that qualified him for the 
ECAC and New England 
Championship meets, White 
looked forward to capturing the 
BIG EAST title in the long 
jump for the second time in his 
two years at BC. 

Along with White, Assistant 
Coach Jackie Adams felt that 
Sophomore Carlton Rowe and 
Junior Anthony DiCosmo also 
demonstrated "All-American 
potential." Competing in the 
triple jump, Rowe and 
DiCosmo attained the second 



and the third best jumps in BC 
history, respectively, after only 
their first meet at the Boston 
University Terrier Classic. 
White, Rowe, and DiCosmo 
also played for the Eagles 
football team in the fall. Head 
Coach Randy Thomas was 
pleased with this addition to 
the men's team, commenting 
on the success the athletes have 
brought to the track and filed 
program. 

In distance events, Thomas 
focused on the team's strength 
in the mile and 3K. Junior Brian 
Shafer and Sophomore Marshal 
Armitage, with a time of 4 
minutes and 1 seconds in the 
mile, qualified for the ICAAAA 
competition. Shafer shared the 
spotlight with Freshman Justin 
Burdon and Sophomore Derek 
Holland in the 3K, and all were 
expected to perform well on 
regional and national levels. 




This Page 

A member of the men's team prepares for a sprint. 

Opposite Page 

H member of the team practices the pole vault. 



Men's hack 





Melissa Cody 



Men's Track Z51 



CHANGING OF THE 




by Jim Gruber 



1 997 was a year of change 
for Boston College's athletic 
department with the hiring of a 
new athletic director and new 
head coaches for the school's 
two highest-profile athletic 
programs. January saw Tom 
O'Brien complete his first 
month on the job as head 
football coach, while Al Skinner 
took the reigns of the men's 
basketball program in April, and 
Gene DeFilippo completed the 
changes by assuming the post 
of athletic director in 
September. 

After a national search, BC 
tapped DeFilippo, 47, to replace 
Chet Gladchuck, who left 
Chestnut Hill to take the same 
position at the University of 
Houston in July. DeFilippo had 
previously served as Villanova's 
AD for four years. 

The first months of 
DeFilippo's tenure saw the new 
AD attempt to open the lines of 
communication between his 
post and the student body. 
DeFilippo appeared open to 
ideas such as reworking the 
Conte Forum seating plan to 
allow students to sit nearer to 
the court. Before Galdchuck 
left, however, he had the 
opportunity to leave his mark 
at BC by filling vacancies in 
both the football and basketball 
head coaching positions. 



Gladchuck found O'Brien, 
the offensive coordinator at 
Virginia, to be a suitable 
replacement for Dan 
Henning. O'Brien stabilized a 
program that had been rocked 
by a scandal, leading the 
Eagles to a 4-7 mark in his 
first season. After BC showed 
improvement in its final 
games, O'Brien was granted a 
contract extension through 
2002 by DeFilippo. 

After a recruiting flap 
caused Jim O'Brien to head to 
Ohio State, Gladchuck 
plucked Al Skinner away from 
the University of Rhode 
Island to head the men's hoop 
team. With several players 
graduating or transferring, 
Skinner began the 1997-'98 
season with only five veteran 
scholarship players. The new 
coach was forced to complete 
his roster with some late 
recruits and several walk-ons, 
but still managed to keep the 
team around the .500 mark. 

1997-'98 will thus be 
remembered as Year One of a 
trio of sports eras at Boston 
College. 



'ew Coaches & AT? 




MelissaC I 




Kern- ( 




This Page 

Dtudents show their enthusiam and support for the football team 
at a November football game against Army. Hundreds of student- 
fans took off their shirts in 20 degree weather to encourage the 
team. 

lorn O'Brien spoke at various press conferences throughout his 
first season as head football coach. He joined the staff in December 
of 1996. 

Opposite Page 

Uene DeFilipo replaced former athletic director Chet Gladchuk 
after he resigned during the summer of 1997. DeFilipo left his 
postion as AD at Villanova to lead the Eagles. 

Head basketball coach Al Skinner finished his first season this year 
after replacing Jim O'Brien in April 1997. 



7\lew Coaches & AD Z53 



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E N I O R 

Coming into our Own 



s 








than 






raduation day came faster 
an any of us expected. Armed 
with the experiences of these 
four years, we are ready to move 
forward to the next step in our 
lives. Each of us has come to be 
the person that we are because 
of our time together at Boston 
College. As Seniors, we walk 
with more confidence, 
appreciate our friends for 
everything that they mean, and 
know ourselves for who we are. 



Inner Reflections 



' '■;:•' -:■>,. . 






Editors - Amy Kissane & Kate Johnson 



Coming into our Own Z55 




Z56 Seniors 




Class of 1998 Z57 




Mention to anyone that you attend Boston College, and their response will inevitably be, "Wow! What a great 
school!" We agree, of course, because we know it is an amazing place to go to college. But what makes it so special? 
Take an informal survey here on campus and most students will probably answer, "The people." I always said that, 
but after interviewing a group of seniors, nominated by their peers for this section of the book, I believe more than 
ever that it truly is the students of Boston College that make it an outstanding institution. 

"His vision, his strength, his courage come from his own spirit." Ayn Rand's quote from The Fountainheaa 
is perfectly applicable to these seniors. The Class of 1998 is an unusually talented, creative, driven, and fun-loving 
group of people. They have left their mark on BC in a way that few classes before have done. As you read through 
these pages, you will see Ail-Americans, RAs who have truly helped their residents to feel at home in Chestnut Hilll 
athletes who have broken all barriers to pursue their dreams, a talented artist who has used her gift to give nevt 
meaning to the lives of disabled adults, several UGBC Presidential candidates who gained more through losing than 
they might have through winning, and students who gave BC a little push in the right direction to help the schoo 
begin to overcome its own barriers. You'll read of each student's challenges and goals, and see how they manageci 
to achieve them. And through it all, a spirit pervades these seniors' personalities—the spirit that helped them makt; 
BC a wonderful place to spend the four years that will send you on your way into the "real" world. 



Stephen Sobhl 



Dani Flemming 



Steve Sobhi is one of the 
most genuine, caring, involved 
seniors at BC. His experiences 
in the first days with the Shaw 
Leadership program motivated 
him to become involved at BC 
and encouraged him to take 
advantage of everything BC has 
to offer. He came to BC hoping 
to learn as much as possible , not 
only inside the classroom, but 
outside as well. From his 
experiences here, he has realized 
that the more he gave to every 
situation, the more he gained. 

Steve was very involved in 
UGBC and was an RA for two 
years. He enjoyed watching both 
himself and his residents 
experience college life. He meets 
someone new every day and each 
person opens his eyes to a new 
part of the world. 

"v. 
Z58 ^Perspectives 



Although he knows many 
people on campus, most would 
be surprised to hear about his 
adventures as "So-Small" the 
Clown when he was younger. 
Fully clad in a black and white 
polka dot costume, he would 
join parades with his mom and 
walk proudly up and down the 
streets of Texas. 

He loves hanging out in the 
Eagle's Nest, where he is sure to 
see many of his friends. Steve is 
very personable and charismatic, 
a friend who is genuinely 
interested in what people have 
to say. As junior Karen 
Montenegro says "He's one of 
the only people who remembers 
your name from the first time he 
meets you!" 





Josej^QuiHtaHjUlas 



Every April, BC students 
gather to watch the Boston 
Marathon and to cheer on 
each runner passing by. While 
most spectators are glad they 
themselves are not sweating 
up Heartbreak Hill, secretly 
most people wish they had 
the stamina and the heart to 
run the 26.5 miles to 
downtown Boston. Although 
many students actually 
perform this feat, one is 
particularly amazing. 

A degeneration of the 
retina and cornea when he 
was three months old left 
Joseph Quintanilla 

permanently visually 

impaired .Joe has loved sports 
since childhood, but many 
were difficult due to his vision. 
Joe was thrilled when the track 
coach at his high school asked 



him to join the team. His coach 
even trained and ran with Joe in 
his first Boston Marathon. 

Joe has run marathons for 
the United Sates Blind Athlete 
Association and qualified for 
the Paralympic Team in 1 996 - 
-the highest honor for visually 
impaired athletes. He was 
affected by ITB Syndrome 
halfway into the race and was 
unable to finish, but was amazed 
by the support and friendship 
of the other athletes, all of whom 
were at least 14 years older than 
himself. 

Joe gives 100% in every area 
of his life, finding each day to be 
a "celebration of life." Joe sees 
motivation in his friends and 
family, especially in friend and 
teammate Angie Graham — little 
does he know that he himself is 
an inspiration to us all. 



Pamela, Harlow 



Few people have the 
chance to use something they 
love to help other people. 
Pamela Narkun is one of these 
fortunate few. 

Pam's passion for art and 
its effects is unparalleled. At 
BC, she capitalized on her 
interest by joining Artplosion. 
Her consistent petitioning for 
a place on campus to exhibit 
student art was rewarded with 
space on Newton and a 
showcase of student works at 
O'Connell House. She was 
recognized for her initiative 
by being named Art Director 
and Assistant Producer for 
Artplosion her senior year. 

The summer after her 
junior year, Pam received a 
grant from BC to travel to 
Minnesota and see how 
disabled artists have used their 



artwork to communicate with 
the world around them. She 
was amazed by the pride of their 
families and the involvement 
from the community. She was 
so moved by these artists that 
she decided to try to use these 
same processes to help disabled 
people in Boston. 

Through her honors thesis 
and senior project for her studio 
art major, Pam works with adults 
in Boston who have Downs 
Syndrome and developmental 
problems. She allows her 
"students" to choose their own 
medium, and to create anything 
they wish, expressing themselves 
through their artwork. Pam's 
photographs ofher students gives 
them a voice through their art, 
something she would like to 
bring to everyone. 

Verspecrtves Z59 



Vamelte^ Wood 



self-inflicted and half doctor's 
orders, Danielle took to the field 
again. As a sophomore and 
junior, she was regional Ail- 
American in the New England 
East Coast Atlantic Conference. 
As a junior, she was the leading 
scorer and won the Leadership 
Award for her team 

Danielle thrives off the field 
as well. She excels in the School 
ofManagement, havingwon the 
CSOM Athletic Scholarship her 
senior year. Spending large 
amounts of time in Conte Forum 
has made it one of her favorite 
places on campus. She can't 
thank her roommates enough 
for all their support. "Especially 
AMB- thanks for all the 
opportunites." Danielle would 
either like to coach or to continue 
her work at Sports Information 
in the future. 



In high school, Danielle 
Wood excelled in sports. She 
played soccer, basketball, 
Softball, and lacrosse, and was 
recruited by BC to play Varsity 
Soccer. Instead, she decided, to 
try out for BC's Lacrosse team, 
and started as a center her 
freshman year. Plagued by a 
back injury since her freshman 
year in high school, Danielle 
underwent surgery halfway 
through her time at BC. Because 
of this, "Ever to Excel" has held 
a special meaning for her. 

After her surgery, Danielle 
had two choices: give up and 
never play sports again, or push 
past and overcome her obstacles. 
She chose the hard way. One 
day, she abruptly decided she'd 
come too far to give up, and that 
she was going to do everything 
she could to play again. After 
months of rehabilitation, half 

Anthony Qabri&U> 

Anthony Gabriele has been your barriers to learn more about 
described as "definitely one of yourself. His philosophy seems 
the ten most outstanding exactly in accord with BC's 
students and one of the most challenge "Ever to Excel," yet 
incredible people I have ever Anthony's own personal motto 
met" by friend Jeffrey 
Hitchcock. Anthony was an 
active member in BC's Salt and 
Light Company, leading retreats 
for youth groups in the Boston 
area. Co-leaders can attest to his 
ability to reach out to younger 
students and draw them into a 
group, helping everyone to feel 
comfortable. He has continued 
his work with area youth, 
teaching English to high school 
students for his School of 
Education practicum. 

Throughout his college 
career, Anthony has realized you 
have to set your limits and push 
past them. It is essential to break 

Z60 "Perspectives 




Elena K. Vizvaty I 

is "Shoot for the Moon, you'll house-painting business. Fori 
always land on a star." In the present, however, hewilk 
following this, his ultimate strive to continue his teachings 
dream is to open a restaurant in the West after graduation.! 
out west with his two closest 
friends from home, the same 
two "buddies" with whom he 
has already succesfully built a 





Michael Terrayoy 



When one hears the name 
Mike Ferrara, what is the first 
thing that comes to mind? Is it 
his incredible acting talent? His 
school spirit and support of BC? 
Mike's athletic form racing 
around the track during track 
practice? Perhaps one 

remembers a stomachache from 
laughter after one of Mike's skits 
for Hello Shovelhead. Or his 
complete attention and 
understanding when a friend or 
resident comes to him for advice. 
For those who have never 
actually spoken to Mike, they 
may only be able to associate his 
name with the guy in the bright 
orange jacket with the ever- 
present smile often seen walking 
across the Dust Bowl. In reality, 
he is all of these things, and 
more. 

Despite faded memories of 



an alcoholic kindergarten 
teacher, who often warned her 
class that the world was coming 
to an end, Mike has become an 
influential and extremely 
optimistic person. In the face of 
the disappointment of 
essentially being cut from the 
track team freshman year, Mike 
came back as a sophomore 
stronger than ever, amazing 
everyone with his spirit and 
talent. 

While BC's "Ever to Excel" is 
a "fabulous" motto, Mike lives 
by the belief that your "attitude 
is the paintbrush on the canvas 
of life." He even goes so far as to 
combine his motto with BC's, 
stating that "if you can paint 
with your attitude, even when 
things are bad, you're excelling." 



Kerry Girvin 



Asking Brian O'Brien to 
pick his favorite activity is like 
asking a chocoholic to choose 
his favorite candy. He was an 
RA for two years, developing 
friendships with all of his 
residents that he will cherish for 
the rest of his life. His job as an 
RA gave him a chance to meet 
and help people and to be social 
- all the while going at his own 
pace. He enjoyed being a part of 
the Shaw Leadership Program 
as well. He made good friends 
right from the start, and was 
able to get to know people 
outside the class of 1998. 

He jumped right into BC 
political realm as a freshman by 
winning a UGBC Senate seat. 
However, one of his biggest 
challenges here was running for 
UGBC President - he had felt 
the need since his freshman year. 
He was crushed when he lost. 
The world crashed down on him 
j for two days, until he decided 



"not to grump" and got on with 
his life. He chose to learn from 
this experience, just as he did 
from all his challenges and pitfalls 
atBC. 

Brian has given so much to 
BC, but he has also gained a lot. 
He is a people person and his 
door is open to everyone. As RA 
Jenn Skoczelas noticed, "Brian 



Briatv OtZriew 



gets more visits from his 
residents in one day than some 
RAs get all year." Residents 
Dan Burke and Bill Kerrigan 
feel that "Brian stands out as 
being the type of person who 
gets along with everyone." 



His excitement and love for 
BC is unparalleled. Among the 
last to leave every home football 
and basketball game, Brian's 
generous and contagious spirit 
shows through in every area of 
his life. 




Terspectives Z61 



Leigh Havlati 



"The girl has more on her 
plate than I believe most seniors 
can handle, yet she genuinely 
and sincerely dedicates her entire 
self to each project she 
undertakes." This is a perfect 
introduction to Leigh Harlan, 
thanks to friend Rachel Konen, 
yet it fails to describe the vitality 
and exuberance that surrounds 
this South Carolinian. 

Leigh found freshman year 
in New England to be a difficult 
transition. Once she overcame 
her fears, she realized that "life is 
boring if you're not handed those 
challenges." 

Her career at BC would 
suggest she has found no 
problem rising to the challenges 
presented to her. She did 
research on eating disorders as a 
Scholar of the College, and hopes 
to continue her education as she 



strives for her Ph.D. 

She was an officer in the 
Mendel Club her junior and 
senior year, as well as holding a 
prestigious position as 
chairperson of BC's Judicial 
Board. She volunteers for the 



Admissions Program as a 
greeter and student panelist, 
and enjoys talking to 
prospective freshmen about 
how much BC has given her. 
Yet Leigh's resume fails to 
show what is really important 
to her - her family and the 
friends she has made in 
college. 

Although Leigh would 



embrace the chance to drive 
around New England before she 
returns to South Carolina, the 
opportunity rarely arises. 
Instead, when she begins to feel 
overwhelmed, she drives to an 
airfield near BC to sort out her 
thoughts and to write. She enjoys 
talking with the pilots, and takes 
advantage of the scenery to 
practice her photography skills. 





Rashied McCreary 



Elena K. Vizvary 



Z6Z Perspectives 



"Rashied McCreary is. . . 
committed to creating a better 
world for all of us. He... 
believes in the ability of people 
of diverse backgrounds to 
work together with an 
understanding and respect of 
their differences." Charles 
Charpentier describes 
Rashied, and allows his 
friend's spirit and charisma to 
speak for itself. 

Rashied's first semester as 
a freshman was, in his words, 
"awesome," but spring 
semester was slightly different. 
The UGBC presidential 
elections and other issues on 
campus forced Rashied to 
take a step back to see BC for 
what it really was: an amazing 
school, but one that was 
aching for change. 

He decided to take action 
himself, instead of waiting for 



someone else to solve thee 
problems on campus. Together i 
with Anthony Rich and Omari i 
Walker, Rashied created;! 
D.I.V.E.R.S.E.,agroupfoundedd 
to work with the diversity onij 
our campus, instead of against) 
it. 

Rashied has left his mark oni, 
BC in other ways. Although hei 
thought he'd left his wrestlings 
days in high school, Rashied 
realized he loved the sport too 
much to give it up. Hia 
sophomore year, a month and i 
half into the season, Rashieo 
went to the wrestling coach anc 
asked if he could join the team 
The coach saw a spark in Rashiec 
and gave him a chance to prow 
himself. Rashied did just that 
As captain senior year, Rashiec 
was a mentor for his teammates 
as an excellent athlete and ai 
outstanding person. 



Jason Williams' name has 
always been associated with 
UGBC. He ran for President 
bis junior year, and was selectd 
is the Executive Director for 



Social and Cultural Issues as a 
Senior, leaving him in charge of 
UGBC's programming and 
lectures. He also enjoyed 
working as co-director of LGBC, 



a job he found to be fun, yet 
draining at times. 

Jason's four years at BC 
were a time of self discovery. 
Jason joined clubs his 




Jasofv 
Williams 

freshman year that, as a senior, 
were exactly opposite of what he 
came to believe in. One of 
Jason's greatest challenges was 
not only running as BC's first 
openly gay UGBC presidential 
candidate, but also dealing with 
how others reacted to him 
afterwards. Brian O'Brien found 
that Jason "has more courage 
than anyone I've met." 

Jason has seen BC encourage 
each person to flourish in his 
own way. He feels that others 
can be negatively affected if even 
one person is prohibited from 
being his best. People are able to 
contribute far more when they 
are completely at ease with 
themselves - a truth Jason has 
experienced personally. 



Kerry Girvin 

Angle, QrakajHi; 



Angie Graham truly 
exemplifies the title "All 
American." An amazing 
athlete and an inspiration to 
her friends, Angie is also a 
caring, giving friend and 
volunteer. 

Proudly hailing from 
Toronto, Canada, Angie came 
to BC with high goals and 
aspirations for success. Her 
freshman year, Angie began 
winning races in the mile and 
the Distance Medley Relay. 
She ran Cross-Country her 
sophomore year, finding the 
sport to be challenging and 
almost overwhelmingly 
difficult. Yet she persisted. 
Her senior year, she won third 
place at the National 
Competition for Cross- 
Country. This was her highest 
athletic accomplishment, 



proving she could attain any goal 
as long as she never gave up. Her 
abilities have put BC on the 
map, and she has had a positive 
impact not only on the sport, 
but on her peers as well. 

The amount of time running 
takes would be enough to 
exhaust anyone, but Angie still 
finds time to volunteer, an 
activity she fell in love with 
through the P.U.L.S.E. 
program. She believes that 
society ignores the elderly, even 
though they are one of our most 
valuable assets. She worked, in 
particular, with a lady in her 
eighties who always amazed 
Angie with her outrageous 
stories. This, in addition to the 
friendships she's formed here, 
have made Angie a strong, 
compassionate person. 

Terspectives Z63 




Class of 1998 165 



l 'mors 









Class of 1998 Z67 





Christina E. Abad 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Maram B. Abdel-Azim 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Rosemary J. Abardo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Erin-Marie Abraham 

Arts &C Sciences 
English 




Keith Abrams 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jeanne M. Affuso 

School of Management 
Finance 



Amanda C. Abresch 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Sociology 



Jeannine L. Abruzzo 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Darren P. Aftahi 

School of Management 
Finance 



Colleen A. Agan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Carl F. Ackerman 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Communications 




Elizabeth K. Agli 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jennifer A. Adler 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociolgy 




Tehzeeb Ahmed 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Z68 Seniors 



/ 





kAfc 



Hye-Won Ahn 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Robert J. Airasian 

School of Management 
Finance 



Brian L. Albert 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



Joseph V. Aleardi 


Shimon M. Alkon 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


English 


Communications 






Amy M. Allen 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Joseph G. Allen 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Liza Marie Alon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Justin E. Amaral 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Information Systems 



Joseph A. Amatrucola 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 




Stacy A. Ambrose 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jack A. Amidon 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Minor: Computer Science 



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I ro, ** r * i '^B 


K. 


V '$ 


^K 


^JB 


^4 A ^ 


Eddlyne Amilcar 


Christina M. Anderson 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 
Psychology 


Biochemistry 
Philosophy 








Class of 1998 Z69 



Christine R. Anderson 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Denise N. Anderson 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Derek W. Anderson 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Erik E. Anderson 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 
Computer Science 



Benjamin R. Andrews 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations 




Gina N. Andrighetto 

School of Education 

Chemistry 
Secondary Education 



Brian P. Angeli 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Lauren E. Angelone 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Nancy L. Angiola 

School of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 



Lisa M. Angulo 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 





David J. Angus 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Anthony T. Aniello 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Mary Sharlene Annett 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Amy R. Anselmo 

School of Management 

Communications 

Marketing 



Z70 Seniors 




Tamar R. Aprahamian 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



John B. Araneo 

School of Management 
Finance 




Isabel Araoz 

School of Management 
Economics 



Seena S. Aras 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 





Cristina Arespacochaga 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 



Laura A. Armstrong 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Anna V. Aroniadis 

Arts & Sciences 
Classical Civilizations 



Elizabeth N. Arruda 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Katherine M. Arsenault 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Theology 




Brett B. Artmann 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Tania R. Assad 

School of Management 
Finance 



Robert J. Atha 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Cristina M. Auffant 

School of Management 
Operations 



Lisa J. Auriemma 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Class of 1998 171 



Lisa A. Austin 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Secondary Education 




Mi-Young Bae 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




William N. Bailey III 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Theology 




Sylvia M. Bajor 

School of Management 

English 

Marketing 



Emily D. Babalas 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Praveen Babu 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Noel Michael Bacarra 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Elisabeth V. Baker 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Monica M. Balboni 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Ann M. Baldelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Michael A. Bachelor 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 







Broderick A. Bagert Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 




Abigail F. Baine 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John P. Baldi 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Z7Z Seniors 



Paul M. Baldyga 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kathryn E. Ball 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Sciences 



Shabir S. Balolia 

School of Management 
Finance 



Chrisitne L. Banach 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Amr A. Banaja 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Kerianne Barbour 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Valerie A. Barges 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Cheri R.Bari 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Andrew Barna 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Emile D. Barnes 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Marketing 




Brian K. Barnett 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer A. Barrett 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 



Kathleen A. Barrett 

Arts &C Sciences 
History 



Michael P. Barrett 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Craig M. Barry 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Maura B. Barry 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Christopher E. Bashian 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Michael A. Basilio 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Psychology 



Stacey E. Bassett 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Meaghan K. Bastianelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Class of '1998 Z73 




Class of 19 ff 8 175 




Class of 1998 2/ 



m 





Michelle L. Bata 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Spanish 



Max V. Bauer 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Aaron D. Bearce 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Susan Robin Beattys 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jeffrey B. Becker 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Poilitical Science 



Brian T. Bedinghaus 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



William A. Beekman 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Political Science 



Daniel A. Behringer 

ol of Manage: 
Accounting 



School of Management 



Bradley H. Belden 

School of Management 



Danielle A. Beliveau 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Brent Bell 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations 



Dean W. Bell 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Matthew J. Bellico 

Arts & Sciences 

History 



Justin R. Belliveau 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



John M. Bello 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Paul J. Beltramini 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Mathematics 



Joel A. Beaudette 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Kevin P. Beigel 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Johanna L. Bellezza 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 




Christian N. Bender 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 






° A 




Ravi O. Beng 


Bryan C. Bennett 


Andrew E. Bentley 


Nicole A. Benz 


Laura A. Bergeron 


\its &C Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Economics 


Accounting 
Marketing 


Accounting 


History 











fc i £^ A 






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9w 








1 ;'•'•'•: i. 







Brenda G. Bergman 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Faith, Peace, & Justice 



Laurel A. Bernini 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Art History 



# 




Cindy L. Beyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



KimberlyA. Beezer 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kieran C. Bezila 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Raj P. Bhakta 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

History 



Samir Bhavnani 

School of Management 

Finance 

Human Resources 



Class of 1998 Z79 





Renee M. Biancardi 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Psychology 



Gabrielle O. Bieg 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 




Julie C. Biggane 

School of Management 
Economics 



Caren E. Bikowski 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Bajar Bilgin 

School of Management 
Economics 



David F. Bingham 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Danielle M. Birriel 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Andrea L. Blackburn 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geology 



John E. Blair 

Advancing Studies 
Economics 




Leah M. Blake 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Nicole E. Blanchette 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Spanish 



Christina Blanco 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Frank Blanco III 

School of Management 
Finance 



Erica L. Bode 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 



l&O Seniors 



Traver H. Boehm 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Ann Marie Bogo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Anne P. Bohlen 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Edward P. Boland 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Kristin A. Bolesky 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Megan A. Boll 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 



Heather F. Bordick 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Human Resources 




Ronald R. Bose 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jamie J. Boteler 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed., Moderate 
Spec. Needs, Human Dev. 




Ileana Bouet 


Nicholas F. Bove 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


Psychology 



Anne Marie Borrego 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Andrea Borzuku 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Christopher G. Boscia 

Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

Concentration: Finance 




Class of 1998 281 



'* 




James J. Boviard 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Adrianna Boychuk 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Beth E. Boyle 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Laura A. Bradnini 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Phil Bradstock 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Edward B. Bradstreet 

School of Management 

Finanace 

Marketing 



Kerry A. Brady 

School of Education 

Psychology 
Human Development 



Jesse Brandt 

School of Management 
Finance 




Anne E. Brannigan 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Richard S. Brauman 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Deirdre A. Brannin 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Rachel L. Braunstein 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Sarah L. Braunstein 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kathleen M. Brearley 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Z8Z Seniors 




Ryan D. Breitenbach 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michelle Breitman 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mathematics 





a 


1 


^/* 



yan H. Brehmner 


Aileen M. Brennan 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts &C Sciences 


Philosophy 


Linguistics 




John A. Brennan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Christina Brenner 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 




Samantha Briggs 

School of Management 
Finance 



Eileen A. Broderick 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




John J. Breslin 


Ann C. Brewster 


Christiana J. Briggs 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Philosophy 


Political Science 




Salena M. Brody 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Theodore P. Brogowski 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Melissa A. Brooks 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Management 



Class of 1998 IBS 




Class of 1998 ZS C - 



Victoria L. Brooks 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
Pre Med 



Kieran A. Brune 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Laura M. Bryant 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Mairin E. Brzica 

School of Management 
Finance 
Spanish 





Adam H. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Andrea L. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Monica L. Bua 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Spanish 



Jennifer A. Buck 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jeffrey Browne 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Anthony Buckley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Maura C. Brueggen 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations 



Robyn L. Brushett 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Douglas G. Brzezinski 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Margaret A. Buckley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Z86 Seniors 



i . w 



Sara Buckley 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 



Jon Marc Buffa 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Thomas R. Bumbolow 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Honors 



John J. Bunker 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Michael C. Burer 

School of Management 

Accounting 




Simeon J. Buresch 

Arts & Sciences 

Education 

English 



Alicia M. Burke 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Matthew R. Burke 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Michael A. Burke 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michaela G. Burke 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 




Anthony D. Burkhart 


Stephanie E. Burnett 


Jennifer A. Burnham 


Amanda L. Burns 


David A. Burns 


Arts & Sciences 


Aits & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


Art History 


Mathematics 


Child In Society 


Nursing 


Information Systems 


English 




Early Childhood Education 




Operations 




Michael J. Burns 


Heidi R. Burt 


Joe N. Bustros 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Biochemistry, Biology 


Human Development 


Psychology 


Philosophy 


Psychology 





Beth A. Buder 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Mary E. Buttarazzi 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Class of 1998 187 



Luisa M. Buzon 


Lisa S. Byank 


Danielle Byington 


Conor N. Byrne 


Lynn M. Byrne 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Communications 


Communications 


Mathematics 


Finance 


Accounting 


English 


Human Development 


Pre Med 








Michael J. Byrne 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jessica L. Byron 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 



Edward O. Cabral 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Johanna M. Cadena 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Thomas R. Cahill 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Economics 




Peter J. Caiazzo 


Andrea E. Calabrese 


Beatriz E. Calero 


Dennis L. Calix- Bueso 


Stephanie M. Calone 


School of Management 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Arts &C Sciences 


School of Management 


Finance 


Early Childhood Education 


Finance 


Theatre Arts 
Art History 


Art History 
Human Resources 




David H. Camacho 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Allison M. Campbell 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jason Campbell 

Arts &C Sciences 
History 



Sean P. Campbell 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Tricia A. Campbell 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



ZS8 Seniors 



Lisa C. Cancilla 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Christopher Capobianco 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




iM 



Christopher Capuana 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Holly E. Canevari 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kendra A. Capell Caroline O. Capetola 

School of Education School of Education 

Human Development Elementary Ed., Moderate 

Early Childhood Education Special Needs, Human Dev. 



Brian J. Capitelli 

School of Management 

Finance 




Danielle C. Cappanelli 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 




Derek J. Capurso 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 






Adrianne B. Carabillo 


Christopher Caras 


Elizabeth M. Carey 


Thomas K. Carey 


Joe R. Carinci 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Mathematics 


Finance 


English 
Human Development 


Finance 


Studio Art 
Class of 1998 289 




■ of 199$ 291 







jtfj/ors 




Zlassot'1998 Z95 





Jill N. Carpenter 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Stephanie A. Carpenter 

Arts & Sciences 
English Sociology 



Edward Carr 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer Carl 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Lutrisia Carmania 

School of Management 
Finance 




Kathleen V. Carney 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Kathleen M. Carolan 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Lisa M Carraro 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Laura M. Carre 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Teresa M. Carreiro 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Felicia D. Carrington 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Nicole M. Carrio 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Suzanne M Carroll 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Todd E Carroll 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Seniors 



Melissa Carter 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 




Chris M. Cassidy 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jocelyn M. Cavanna 

Arts &C Sciences 

Economics 



Daniela A. Carvalho 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Karen M Casey 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Meaghan M. Casey 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Nelie A. Casimir 

Arts & Sciences 

History 




Maria D Castro 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communications 



Brad W. Catania 


Ann P Caterino 


Thomas J. Catinazzo 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Marketing 


Spanish 


Finance 




Devon G. Celic 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Natalia D. Celli 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Anisha L. Chablani 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Class of 1998 Z95 




Alex Chamberlain 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Faith Chan 

School of Management 
English 
Finance 



Yung Hsuan A. Chang 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Charles P. Charpentier 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Sociology 



Allison J. Chase 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Amy D. Chase 


Neal Chawla 


Jeanine C. Chen 


Linda C. Chen 


Marc C. Chen 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


French 


Biology 


Accounting 
Finance 


Communications 


Geology 





Sharlene S. Chen 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Shack W. Chew 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 




Julie E. Chisholm 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Joanna Chitko 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child In Society 



Z96 Seniors 




Cecelia W. Cho 


Christian E. Cho 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Economics 




Sandy L. Cho 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Sooann Choi 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Monica A. Chuck 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Chang K. Choe 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 





Corrie E. Chomich 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Danielle L. Choquette 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 
Pre Med 



Brandy E. Christensen 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Psychology 



f 

Gordon Chu 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Chung Ha Chung 

School of Management 
Finance 



Brian T. Church 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Holly C. Ciampi 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Sociology 



Lisa A. Ciampi 

School of Education 

Child In Society 
Elementary Education 



Class of 1998 297 



Joe B. Ciolino 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Laura A. Clark 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Andrew A. Cipro 

School of Management 
Marketing 



John R. Cirrito 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Pre Med 



Kathleen A. Clancy 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




StaceyA. Clements 

School of Education 

Human Development 





Kathryn A. Clough 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Monica K. Coakley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



William J. Coakley 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Edward C. Coats 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Amy C. Clark 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Erin M. Cleary 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Adriana Clifton 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Rachel A. Cohen 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Z9S Seniors 



Sarah A. Colbert 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Thomas C. Coleman 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Jennifer M. Collett 

School of Management 
Economics 



Christina A. Collins 

Arts & Sciences 

Spanish 

International Studies 



Daniel R. Collins 

Arts &: Sciences 
Communications 




James E Collins 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Susan L. Connell 

Advancing Studies 
American Studies 



Anthony D. Conti 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Theology 



Richard K. Collins 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jamie S. Comras 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Alene J. Conant 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kristin M. Connelly 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Concentration: Marketing 



Paul J. Connolly 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Roger J. Connolly 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Ernest J. Conti 

School of Management 

Finance 
General Management 



Guy Conti 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Venecia E. Conton 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Damian P. Conforti 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Amy E. Conroy 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 




Jessica M. Cook 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Class of 1998 Z99 




1 Seniors 




Class of 1998 301 




Rebecca L. Cook 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations 



Jessica J. Coombes 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Eileen M. Cooney 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Philosophy 



Brendan E. Cooper 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Louis R. Corapi 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 




Kristin M. Corazzini 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Timothy P. Corbett 

School of Management 
Finance 



Deborah R. Cornelio 

School of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 



Gerilyn T. Corpuz 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Ramon L. Cortes 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Latin American Affairs 



Michael J. Cosentino 

School of Management 
Finance 



Elena J. Costa 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Spanish 



Jamie A. Costa 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Tony J. Costa 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Anne R. Costello 

School of Management 



Lisa M. Cotrone 

School of Education 
Early Childhood Education 



Alfredo H. Cottin 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Philosophy 



Michelle S. Covington 
School of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 



Megan Cowan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



'iOZ Seniors 




Erin E. Cowhig 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



^ 



Jennifer M. Coyle 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Michael A. Coyne 

School of Management 
Finance 



Sharod T. Cozart 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Heather M. Crabbe 

Arts & Sciences 

English 




Cynthia A. Crain 

Advancing Studies 
English 







III 


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M 




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K| Mm 


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^mum* 



Stacie V. Craves 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Nancy M. Cremins 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Paul Crisalli 

School of Management 
Finance 



Alison L. Crocker 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Katie L. Crombach 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Adam J.Y. Cronin 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Class of 1998 303 




David P. Cronin 

School of Management 
Finance 



Gregory P. Cronin 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



William R. Crook 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Sarah E. Crootof 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Kevin P. Crow 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jennifer A. Crowley 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kerry E. Crowley 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Sarah E. Cue 

Arts & Sciences 

General Education 

Psychology 



Scott D. Culver 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Brian M. Cummings 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Carrie A. Cunniff 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Katherine L. Cunningham 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Mark R. Cunningham 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Alison B. Curd 

School of Management 
Finance 



304 Seniors 











Matthew L. Curley 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael K. Curley 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Patricia A. Curran 

Advancing Studies 
English 



Colleen E. Custer 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Emma L. Dane 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Valerie A. Daniel 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Stacy L. Daniells 
Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



Heather M. Daqui 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Regine C. Cuvilly 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Brian N. D'Andrea 


Michael A. D'Occhio 


Peter A. Dagostine 


Kristi E. Dailey 


Beth A. Daly 


Alts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Theology 


Biochemistry 


English 
History 


Nursing 


Art History 




Class of 1998 305 



Bina Datta 


Autumn M. Davis 


Jessica M. Dawney 


Mary Dawson 


Andrew C. Day 


-ts & Sciences 


Arts &C Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Political Science 


History 


Elementary Ed., Moderate 


Psychology 


Psychology 


Spanish 




Special Needs, Human Dev. 







t^fc 




Eric J. Days 


Christopher De Angelis 


Diana De La Torriente 


Ryan N. De Masi 


Alfredo R. De Quesada 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts 8i Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


History 


Computer Science 


Psychology 


Biochemistry 


General Management 


Pre Law 








Theatre Arts 





James F. De Santis 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Nikolas A. De Sena 

School of Management 
Human Resources 




Bryan J. De Young 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Melissa K. Dean 

School of Management 

Accounting 



306 Seniors 




Michele K. Debreceni 

School of Management 

Communications 

Marketing 



Elizabeth M. Decourcy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Dana C. Defonte 

School of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 



John V. Dejesus 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





Alvaro Del Castillo 

School of Management 
Economics 
Operations 



Kathleen I. Delapaz 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Domenic J. Dell'osso 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Brie A. Dellacroce 

School of Management 
Human Resources 



Francesca N. Delvecchio 

School of Management 
Marketing 




John J. Demeter 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Amanda K. Demetri 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Emily E. Depalma 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lynn M. Desanti 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Robert J. DeSanto 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Class of 1998 307 




Class of 199$ 309 




Class of 1998 311 



Laura A. Deschenes 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Noelle A. Deslauriers 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Amy J. Desmond 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Corry P. Detwiler 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Lisa A. Devitt 

Arts &C Sciences 
Art History 




Pasquale DiBenedetto 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Daniela V. DiBiase 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




AnnMarie DiBiasie 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Clare P. DiBiasie 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Benjamin E. Dick 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



SamanthaJ. Dickson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael A. DiForio 

School of Management 
Marketing 



51Z Seniors 



Michael F. DiMaio 


Gregory A. DiMarzio 


Caroline S. DiMarzo 


Colette M. Dinneen 


Linda M. DiPaola 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Finance 


Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 


English 


Psychology 

Theology 




Jessica M. Dispena 


Lisa Ditalia 


Marielys J. Divanne 


Eric M. DiVincenzo 


David M. Dlott 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Sociology 


Marketing 


English 
Secondary Education 


Political Science 


Finance 




JiciaJ. Doble 


Heather A. Docherty 


Camille J. Dodero 


Patrick J. Doenner 


Michael B. Doherry 


)1 of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


Human Development 


Political Science 


Finance 


Communications 


Marketing 


Human Resources 


Spanish 




English 





dLfc^l 




Sarah E. Dohoney 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 


Henry J. Dolch 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 


Christopher DoUard 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theology 


Debra M. Dombrowski 

School of Management 

Human Resource 

Marketing 


Paul J. Dominski 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Class of 1998 313 




Henry J. Donaghy 


Brian T. Donahue 


Jean M. Donahue 


Cotter W. Donnell 


Megan Q. Donoghue 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Biology 


English 


English 


English 
History 


Biology 







Courtney M. Donohoe 


Andrew R. Donovan 


Kathleen A. Donovan 


Kristen K. Doran 


Sandra L. Doran 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Marketing 


English 


Art History 


Communications 


Communications 






History 


Elementary Education 


Elementary Education 




Stephen R. Dosch 

School of Management 
Economics 



Francis T. Downey 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Michelle L. Downing 

Advancing Studies 
Business 



Alexandra M. Doyle 

School of Education 

Child In Society 
Elementary Education 



Tara A. Doyle 

School of Management 
Finance 




Scott Dragos 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Scott E. Drewry 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Erika M. Dreyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Vincent M. Driano 

School of Management 
Finance 



Matthew J. Droskoski 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



514 Seniors 



Lashawn A. Duarte 

School of Management 
Finance 



James D. Duffy 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Political Science 



Amy I. Dufour 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Colleen Dunbar 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Rachel M. Dunlap 

School of Education 
ychology, Elementary Ed. 
Moderate Special Needs 




Susan T. Dunn 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




mm 

Brian P. Dunphy 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 




George A. Duncan 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Matthew J. Dunn 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Brian E. Dunphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Andrea Durko 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 



Dennis F. Eagan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Christina M. Eardley 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jenny R. Ebesutani 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Minor: Women's Studies 



Class of 1998 315 





1 



▲w 



Abigail M. Edson 

School of Management 
Finance 



Thierry Edde 

School of Management 
Economics 



Ryan D. Eddings 

School of Management 

Finance 

Political Science 




Kathryn Edison 

School of Management 
English 



Finance 



Kysa M. Edsall 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Thomas J. Egan 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Political Science 



Juan P. Egas 

School of Management 
Finance 



Gretchen M. Ehrenzeller 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



John C. Eisinger 

School of Management 
Finance 




Ducem Y. Ekinci 


Ryan Elliott 


Katie L. Ellis 


Alison R. Elmer 


Robert A. Emmett IV 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Marketing 


Child In Society 


Elementary Education 


History 


Finance 




Human Development 


Moderate Special Needs 


Political Science 


516 Seniors 











Geralyn M. Endo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Psychology 



Max T. Engel 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Emily J. Engler 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Grace Enriquez 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Suryadi Ernawan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations 



Steve D. Eskridge 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Steven A. Estrada 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Jonathan D. Ewing 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Finance 




Richard S. Ewing 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Elizabeth F. Fabbroni 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Thomas G. Esperiqueta 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 



Nicole A. Esposito 

School of Management 
Finance 



Tamara K. Ensio 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Nicole S. Estebanell 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Class of 1998 317 




Class of 1998 319 



Elizabeth J. Faber 


Barbara A. Faccone 


Sandra Faioes 


Michael L. Fang 


Meredith A. Faro 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Psychology 


Black Studies 
English 


History 


Biology 
Economics 









Jumana T. Farouky 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Jessica M. Farrell 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Theology 



Emile M. Farsoun 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 




Michael H. Fattal 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Caitlin M. Feeney 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Christine A. Fay 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 




Gerard T. Feeney 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Marketing 




320 Seniors 



Kelly A. Feeney 


Thomas J. Felago 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


English 


Finance 


Psychology 


Marketing 



Steven R. Fenlon 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Julie A. Fenton 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Minor: Education 



Dana E. Fentress 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Melinda Ferguson 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Peter D. Fernandez 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jaime L. Ferrarotti 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Mathematics 



Michael E. Ferris 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Ava Field 

School of Education 

Child In Society 
Elementary Education 



Leslie J. Fillion 

School of Management 
Finance 





Debora L. Fillis 


Trevor M. Findlen 


Patrick G. Finley 


Kevin M. Finn 


Theodora J. Finn 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Biology 


English 
Spanish 


Psychology 


Mathematics 


Political Science 

Class of 19 S>8 321 



: 

' • 'IP 





Class of '1998 323 



Richard M. Fiorito 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Brian D. Fisher 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Greg M. Fisher 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Naomi S. Fisher 
School of Education 
Human Development 



Christopher Fitzgerald 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kara K. Fitzgerald 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Marion M. Fitzgerald 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Christie L. Flanagan 


Kevin M. Fleck 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


English 




Psychology 


4 Seniors 





Colin M. Fleming 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Shannon B. Flynn 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Alyson B. Foley 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Mathematics 



Ariana L. Foley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael J. Foster 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Political Science 



Michael P. Foley 

School of Management 
Finance 



StaceyJ. Fontana 

School of Education 

English 

Moderate Special Needs 



Theresa A. Forde 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Christopher Foresto 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Pre Med 




Tara M. Foster 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



H. Matthew Fourcade 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Bryan M. Fox 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Chrisde L. Fox 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 
Pre-Law 




Janna M. Frank 


Tracy E. Fredkin 


Lisa R. French 


Rebecca M. Frett 


Rhondora A. Freyvogel 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts &C Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Human Resources 


Finance 


Psychology 


Theology 


Child In Society, Elem. Ed 


Human Development 


Psychology 






Moderate Special Needs 




Brendan L. Froehlich 

School of Management 
Marketing 


Lisa M. Fucito 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 


Greg A. Fulginite 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 


Richard L. Fuller II 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 


Cara A. Furio 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Class of 1998 325 



Nada Fusaro 

School of Education 
Elementaiy Education 
Human Development 



Kerry A. Gaine 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Stephanie M. Galeota 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Ryan S. Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Education 



Anthony J. Gabriele 

School of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 



Cara E. Gady 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Darcie L. Gagne 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Patrick J. Gagnon 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 







Despina Gakopoulos 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Psychology 



Daniel Galaburda 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Katherine Galbreath 

Arts & Sciences 



Brian P. Galdorisi 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Leslie K. Galiano 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Minor: Management 



Julia C. Gallacher 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Caitlin Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Hispanic Studies 



Erin L. Gallagher 

School of Management 
Finance 




Juan Carlos Gallego 

Advancing Studies 

Business Administration 

Management 



Kirk Gallego 

School of Management 
Finance 



Maura E. Galligan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Erin E. Galvin 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



3Z6 Seniors 



Geoff G. Gamble 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Kelly C. Ganley 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Edward P. Gannon 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Environmental Geoscience 



Jennifer B. Garam 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
Theatre 



Melissa Garbayo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Geoffrey E. Garcia 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Noelia Z. Garcia 

School of Management 

Finance 





Jeffrey M. Garcia 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Political Science 




Preeti A. Garde 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Katherine J. Gargiulo 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Ryan B. Garnick 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Alison K. Garnjost 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Spanish 



Holly A. Gattoni 

Advancing Studies 
Psychology 



Toni-Arm Gaudiosi 

School of Education 
Child In Society, Elementary 
Ed., Moderate Special Needs 



Class of 1998 3Z7 




Paul R. Gazso 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Courtney L. Geisel 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kyle M. Geiselman 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Mary Jeanne Gaul 

School of Education 

English 
Human Development 



MandyA. Gauss 

Arts & Sciences 

Art History 

Minor: Women's Studies 



Stephanie L. Gaviglia 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kerri A. Gawreluk 

Arts &£ Sciences 

Communications 

Minor: Film Studies 



Frances Allison Gendrano 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 
Music 



Andrew C. Gentile 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Minor: General Education 




Craig C. Genualdo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Leah Genzlinger 

School of Education 
Early Childhood Ed. 
Human Development 



Jeffrey D. Geoppinger 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michelle E. George 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Peter B. Gerken 

School of Management 
Marketing 



528 Seniors 




David L. Germond 

School of Management 
Finance 



Erin P. Gibbons 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Rebecca J. Gibson 

School of Management 
Accounting 



William B. Giesen 

School of Management 

Economics 

Marketing 



Susan B. Gilchrist 
School of Education 

Child In Society 
Elementary Education 




Derek E. Gildea 


Marie N. Gilles 


Matthew B. Giordano 


Ralph Giordano 


Stephen J. Giordano 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Biology 


Human Development 


Computer Science 


Communications 
Philosophy 


Economics 




Kerry Girvin 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Minor: Women's Studies 



Jeanette Gisbert 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Natalia Glazman 

Arts & Sciences 

Elementary Education 

Russian 



Nora C. Gleason 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 

Psychology 




Class of 1998 3Z9 




: aflPPS 




C\ C\ 



k 




Ryan P. Gleason 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Charles F. Glorioso 

School of Management 

Business 

Philosophy 



Hannah C. Glover 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Paul A. Glover 

School of Management 
Operations 



James A. Glynn 

Advancing Studies 
Computer Science 




Andrew P. Gobeil 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 



Samantha Goedert 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Nidhi P. Goel 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Priscilla A. Goff 

School of Management 

Human Resources 

Marketing 



Elizabeth A. Gold 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 





Lee S. Goldberg 

School of Management 
General Management 



Maria L. Goldman 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Spanish 




Kirstin P. Gollop 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Minor: Business 



Marissa R. Gonazalez 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



332 Seniors 



Jolie M. Goncalves 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Sean D. Gorman 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Paul C. Gorski 

School of Education 

History 
Secondary Education 



Richard R. Gosselin 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Drew H. Gough 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Minor: Film Studies 



Michael K. Goulston 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Angie J. Graham 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Frank C. Gramuglia 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Michael D. Grant 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theater Arts 



Whitney K. Gould 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 




Shannon R. Grant 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Class of 1998 333 



Timothy V. Gravin 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Paul S. Greenman 

Arts & Sciences 

Germanic Studies 

Psychology 



Jillian M. Gray 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Walter W. Graylor 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



CaraJ. Graziano 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Charles S. Green 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Amelia H. Greiner 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 





Kashleigh A. Greenwood 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Sociology 




Jill A. Grenier 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Danielle T. Griffing 


James P. Griffiths 


Nicole Griffiths 


Rachel P. Grissom 


Karen F. Gross 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


History 


Human Development 


English 


Biology 


French 




Minor: Spanish 


Theater 




334 Seniors 











Linda Groszyk 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Tonio A. Guarino 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



James A. Gruber 

School of Management 
Economics 
Marketing 



Charles R. Gruner 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Cynthia M. Grzmkowski 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



William B. Guaraldi 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 




Stephen C. Guarrera 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Megan Alexandra Gudas 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Katherine A. Guernsey 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Michael P. Guerra 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Stephanie A. Guerra 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Gerlad A. Guerrero 

Arts & Sciences 

Classical Studies 

Minor: Computer Science 



Erin M. Guilfoyle 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Judy A. Guldner 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Theresa M. Gullo 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Psychology 




Deepak Gupta 


Abigail P. Gustafson 


Diana K. Guzzi 


Brian T. Haddad 


Ryan C. Hafher 


School of Management 


School of Education 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Elementary Education 
Mathematics 


Early Childhood Education 


Biology 
Secondary Education 


Biology 

Class of 1998 335 




Class of 1998 337 





Jon H. Hall 


Tina L. Hall 


.rts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


History 


Communications 




Sociology 



Colleen R. Hamilton 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Jesse D. Hallee 


Jennifer A. Halpin 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


English 


Political Science 






Jessica R. Hamlin 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Lindsay K. Hammond 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Hey-Sung Han 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Michelle L. Han 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Political Science 




Mathew R. Hand 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 



Julie A. Haney 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Regina Hanley 

Arts &C Sciences 
English 



Terry P. Hannafin 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jay W. Hannon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



33S Seniors 





Mark F. Harmon 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



David E. Hannoush 

Arts &C Sciences 
Political Science 



Leigh M. Harlan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kashawna P. Harling 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 



Destiny L. Harmon 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




J. Corey Harmon 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Ericka L. Harper 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Christopher Harrick 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Eric J. Harrington 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Michael M. Harrington 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Psychology 




Matthew P. Harrison 


Jennifer L. Hart 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts &C Sciences 


History 


Communications 


Theology 


English 




Lisa Claire Hart 

School of Education 
Computer Science, Elemen- 
tary Ed., Mathematics 



Kara A. Hartigan 

School of Education 

Environmental Geoscience 

Human Development 




Class of 1998 339 



Courtney A. Hartmann 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Elizabeth S. Hartmann 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed., Moderate Spec. 

Needs, Math, Comp. Science 



Gloria A. Hartnett 

School of Management 
Finance 



Tosaiya Hasegawa 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 




Brandon J. Heagle 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Finance 



Vasili F. Hatziris 

Arts & Sciences 
Biological Sciences 




Matthew J. Havens 


Kurt D. Hawks 


Declan Hayes 


Kevin R. Hayes 


Jill K. Hayevy 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


English 


Psychology 


English 
History 


Biochemistry 


Accounting 
Information Systems 




Kelly Ann Heaney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
Theatre 




Kristian L. Hedstrom 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



James W. Heffernan 

Arts &C Sciences 
Economics 



Seniors 




^ V* 1 


£4fi 




Veronica L. Heffernan 




Mark D. Hefflinger 


Arts & Sciences 




Arts & Sciences 


Economics 




Communications 

English 




eghan E. Hegarty 


Courtney L. Heins 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


English 




Theatre 




Kenneth M. Hemenway 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Deborah Hennessey 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Diane Hennessey 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



John E. Hennessey 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kathleen B. Hennessey 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Brian P. Hennigan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Laura S. Henrichs 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lisa A. Henry 

Arts &C Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 



Stephen J. Herlihy 

School of Management 
Finance 



Steven Hernandez 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Class of 199S 341 




lass of 1998 343 




Benjamin J. Hernstedt 


Gretchen R. Hersey 


Edward T. Herzman 


Risha G. Hess 


Ryan D. Hess 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Elementary Ed., Human 


English 


Marketing 


Economics 


French 


Dev., Moderate Special Needs 






Mathematics 




Margaret Higgins 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Michael J. Hill 

Arts & Sciences 



English 




m 




Jeffrey M.Hill 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Justin Hillenbrand 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jeffrey M. Hitchcock 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Spanish 

344 Seniors 



Kimberly Hoang 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Political Science 



CarinnJ. Hodgson 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Political Science 



Michael A. Hoinski 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Daniel B. Holland 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 






Wesley C. Holmes 


Carolyn S. Homer 


Jonathan D. Hong 


Amy L. Home 


Jessica F. Home 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


English 


Accounting 
Marketing 


History 


Nursing 


Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 




Ann Marie Horner 


Brian P. Hough 


Christine A. Houle 


Jennifer F. Houlihan 


Daniel S. Howarth 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


English 


Accounting 


Economics 
Environmental Geoscience 


Political Science 


Marketing 




Luke A. Howarth 


Ryan P. Howe 


Brian E. Hoyt 


Diana Hsieh 


Colleen A. Hubbard 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Communications 


Political Science 


History 


Philosophy 


Nursing 




Theatre Arts 


Political Science 


StudioArts 






Deborah L. Huffman 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Allison L. Hughes 

School of Education 
Computer Science, Elemen- 
tary Ed., Mathematics 



Amy P. Hughes 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Angela M. Hughes 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Carrie P. Hughes 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Class of 1998 345 



Colleen M. Hughes 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kathleen E. Hughes 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Elizabeth L. Hunter 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Michael J. Hutner 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jungsun Hwang 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Christopher Iannacone 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theatre Arts 



Antonio D. Iantosca 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Anthony N. L. Iarrapino 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



John R. Ingoglia 

School of Management 
Finance 



Christine T. Irwin 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Joseph A. Isaia 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Melissa M. Ishii 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Laura M. Ittel 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Ellen E. Jackman 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Barthelemy Jacques 

Arts & Sciences 

Management 

Psychology 




Guido S. Jacques 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Shalini Jaisinghani 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Tim W. Jandovitz 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jesse N. Japitana 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Environmental Science 



Eric A. Jerskey 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Information Systems 



346 Seniors 






Elizabeth A. Jespersen 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Pravesh V. Jethwani 

School of Management 
Opetations 



Jenny Jew 

School of Management 

Infotmation Systems 

Marketing 



Aaron I. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Political Science 



Bradley E. Johnson 

Arts &C Sciences 

Biochemistry 




Catherine B. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 




Kristen D. Johnson 

School of Education 
ilementary Ed., Moderate 
pecial Needs, Human Dev. 





Erica Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Kristen M. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Julie E. Jones 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Suzanne A. Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Amy C. Jordan 

School of Education 

Child In Society 

Elementary Education 



Jill L. Jorgensen 

School of Education 
Early Childhood Education 



Marin A. Jorgensen 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Class of 1998 347 




Christopher Juan 

School of Management 
Finance 



Amelia E. Julian 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Michael S. Julianelle 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Deanna Junge 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Steven A. Kaden Jr. 


Elaina I. Kalivretakis 


David A. Kane 


Raffi S. Kapitanyan 


Panagiotis Karahalios 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Biology 


Psychology 


Biology 


Psychology 


Political Science 
Psychology 




Kristin M. Karam 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Vassilios Karatzenis 

School of Management 
Finance 



Rachel E. Karceski 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Alise Karchmer 

Arts &C Sciences 
Communications 
Marketing 



Meredith K Kasey 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



34$ Seniors 



Bryan M. Kasperowski 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Chad A. Kasperowski 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jennifer L. Katona 

School of Management 
Finance 



Melanie L. Katsur 
Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Brian J. Kavanagh 

School of Management 

Accounting 




Laura A. Kavanagh 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Leonard Keefe 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Ryan E. Kehoe 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Alison M. Kawamura 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Kristen M. Keefer 

School of Management 
Finance 




Gabrielle Keil 

School of Management 
Marketing 



School of Management 
Finance 



David P. Keane 

School of Management 
Finance 



Gregory R. Kearns 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Class of 1998 34-9 




Zlassofl99& 551 



KdHM 




7~l 



■■1 



Mah-Sere Keita 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Janice S. Keith 

School of Education 
Early Education 



Erin S. Kelley 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Jennifer J. Kelley 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Thomas J. Kelley 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Alison E. Kelly 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed., Moderate 

Special Needs, Human Dev. 



Brian J. Kelly 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Erin M. Kelly 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Janice M. Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 
Marketing 
Psychology 




Kathleen M. Kelly 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Leon Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kathleen E. Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Kathleen M. Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Michelle A. Kelly- 
Arts & Sciences 
English 



S5Z Seniors 



Sara E. Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



TaraA. Kelly 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Karl T. Kemp Jr. 

Arts &C Sciences 
Computer Science 



Mary E. Kenda 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Studio Art 




Brendan G. Kennealey 

Arts &C Sciences 
Psychology 



Sean C. Kennedy 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



Meghan A. Keough 

School of Management 

Economics 

Information Systems 



Eric M. Kerwood 

School of Management 
Finance 



Nopharat Khongkiattiyos 

School of Management 
Finance 



HeeWon T. Khym 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 



Susannah A. Kilmer 

Arts & Sciences 

Music 

Psychology 



Auk B. Kim 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 



S. Akbar A. Khan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 




Bernard J. Kim 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Economics 



Class of 1998 353 




u 



Hyunsoo Kim 


Jeongmi Kim 


John H. Kim 


Jung Hwan Kim 


Mi Ree Kim 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Computer Science 


Finance 


English 


Finance 


Psychology 




Carrie A. Kirk 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Amy E. Kissane 

School of Education 

Communications 
Human Development 



Andrew P. Kissell 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Concentration: Biology 



Matthew J. Kita 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Elizabeth D. Kleckner 

School of Education 

Mathematics 
Secondary Education 



354 Seniors 




Carolyn J. Klemballa 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Psychology 



Amanda E. Klenert 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Andrew M. Klucznik 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Rachel S. Knight 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Mary B. Knipe 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




ft 







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Derek K. Koget 


Kris J. Kokofski 


Dylan M. Kollman 


Rachel K. Konen 


Maria P. Konizeski 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Economics 
Political Science 


Psychology 


English 


English 
Philosophy 




Amber B. Kontny 

Arts &C Sciences 
Biology 



Nicole E. Kopeck 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Maja B. Kos 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Walter J. Kosack 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Daniel J. Kosciak 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Michael T. Kosuda 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Anthony Kouardaoughli 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Darryl H. Kowal 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 


Heidi J. Kozma 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 


Andrew L. Krauza 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Class of 1998 355 




Thomas J. Krazit 


Dawn C. Krieger 


Robert A. Kroggel 


Lauren N. Krueger 


Melia B. Kula 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Marketing 


Marketing 


History 


Moderate Special Needs 


Accounting 
Marketing 




Stephanie S. Kuo 


Ross W. Kurz 


Gregory W. Kutylo 


Noelia C. Kvaternik 


Kyong-Mi D. Kwon 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Economics 
Hispanic Studies 


Economics 
Operations 


Psychology 


English 




obb R. Labossiere 


Lauren J. Lacey 


Jeffrey J. Ladik 


Katherine A. Lagomarsino 


Elsie E. Lai 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


English 


History 


English 


Sociology 
Minor: International Studii 




Jodie L. Lake 


Nicole M. Lako 


Kendrah B. Lalsingh 


Jeffrey J. Lamarca 


Peter Lambropoulos 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Economics 


English 


Biology 


Economics 


Finance 


Finance 


Minor: Women's Studies 




Political Science 


Marketing 


356 Seniors 












Caitrin E. Lammon 


Patricia A. Lamont 


Mary Pat Lancelotta 


Elizabeth M. Landis 


Tricia A. Landry 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts &C Sciences 


School of Education 


Communications 


Biology 


Biochemistry 


English 


Human Development 


English 











Matthew T. Lane 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Sociology 



Michael Langer 

School of Management 
Finance 




Stephanie M. Lang 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Matthew S. Langhirt 

School of Management 
Finance 




thryn S. Langstine 

Arts & Sciences 
English 


John E. Lanza 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 


Sangchit Laohathai 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 


Derrick P. LaRosa 

School of Management 
Finance 


Noah J. Larose 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Class of 1998 357 





Amy Kimberly Larsen 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed., Moderate 

Special Needs, Human Dev. 



Shena M. Latta 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Amy J. Laurence 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 



Scott F. Lavelle 

Arts & Sciences 
Finance 




Richard J. La vers 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Andre G. Lavoie 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Minor: Computer Science 



Martin J. Leborgne 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jamie L. LePore 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Donald S. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Grace Lee 

Arts & Sciences 

General Education 

Psychology 



Heidi H. Lee 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Seung Y. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Soh- Young Lee 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Suzanne F. Lee 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Psychology 



358 Seniors 



Andrew Leeds 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



til It 

Patience A. Leonard 

Arts &C Sciences 
Psychology 



Albert Leung 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations 



Christopher Dean LeGras 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Political Science 



Ellen M. Lein 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Patrick J. Lenihan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Francois R. Leon Pauly 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Valerie K. Leroy 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 




Brendan K. Levesque 

School of Management 
Finance 




Peter J. Levesque 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Honors Program 



Danielle C. Levy 

School of Management 

Human Resources 

Marketing 



William S. Leroy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Elizabeth A. Lesher 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Jonathan D. Leuchs 

Arts &C Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



L 7 $* 






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Class of 1998 359 



Josh S. Lewendon 


Stephen V. Lewis 


Timothy K. Lewis 


Steven DK. Li 


Michelle L. Liberman 


hool of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Marketing 


Finance 


Communications 


Biology 


Communications 
Finance 




Gregory J. Liegel 

Arts & Sciences 

Germanic Studies 

History 



I- Yin Lin 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 



Melissa A. Lino 

School of Education 

Elementary Intensive Special 

Needs, Child In Society 




Leanne A. Little 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



James P. Llewellyn 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Joanne H. Liu 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Pek-Hu Liu 


Andrea M. Lizzi 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Elementary Education 


Sociology 


English 






Josephine Lo 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Psychology 



360 Seniors 



Kate E. Loftus 

School of Education 

Child In Society 
Elementary Education 



Michael P. Lohnes 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Erica K. Lolli 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Tara Christine Long 

School of Management 
Information Systems 




Marissa Lopez 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Francesca Lordo 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Vincent L. Lorenti 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Vincent M Lorusso 

School of Management 
English 
Finance 



Ann R Lothian 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Jessica L. Loudon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michelle Lourenco 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Marketing 



Margaret A. Louzonis 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kristin N. Lovell 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Douglas J. Lowe 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Class of 1998 361 




5oZ Seniors 














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Class of 199S 36 




364 Seniors 




Class of 199& 365 



Thomas T. Lowery 


Peter J. Lucas 


Sandra A. Luciano 


Annie Lui 


Jeremy J. Lum 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Computer Science 


Communications 


Child In Society, Elementary 
Ed., Moderate Special Needs 


Biology 


Biochemistry 




Brian G. Lumauig 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Eric D. Lussen 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 





Athena A. Lymberopoulos 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Kenneth E. Lyn-Kew 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Aimee M. Lynch 

School of Education 

Communications 

Education 



D'ArcyA. Lynch 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Studio Art 



Stacey A. Lunetta 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Daniel G. Lydecker 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Daniel C. Lynch 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



366 Seniors 



1 **' * *^ 





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Maureen B. Lynch 


Sarah E. Lyons 


Christopher G. Mabardy 


Donald J. MacAloon 


Michael P. MacConnell 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Economics 


English 


Computer Science 


Economics 


Marketing 




Christine R. MacDonald 


Leonora MacEwen 


Ryan E. MacLeod 


Shawn D. Madden 


Marianne Madigan 


Arts &C Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts &C Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Elementary Ed., Moderate 


Environmental Geology 


Accounting 


Economics 




Special Needs, Human Dev. 


Health Science 




Philosophy 




Richard E. Madigan 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Ken Maeshima 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Catherine Magee 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Pre Med 



Sara S. Maglione 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Abigail E. Maguire 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Nicole J. Maguire 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Jyoti S. Mahapatra 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Pre Med 



Kimberley Ann Maher 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kelly A. Mahoney 

School of Management 

Finance 



Melissa H. Maikos 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Class of 1998 367 



Cristina E MaJabuyoc 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Laura A. Maletis 
School of Education 
Human Development 



Christina Malone 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Devin L. Maloney 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Maureen A. Maloney 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




William A. Maloney 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christopher D. Mancini 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Julia M. Mancuso 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Rosella A. Mancuso 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Emily Mann 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Elena N. Manzelli 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Michael A. Marciano 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Brian A. Marcus 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Konstantina A. Margetis 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael J. Marks 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Meghean F. Maroney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Ernesto M. Marques 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



David M. Marquez 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Philip J. Marino 

Arts & Sciences 

Classics 

Psychology 




Michael W. Marr 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



36$ Seniors 




Carrie V. Marshall 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Mary E. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



■ran 

Heather A. Marshall 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Justin M. Martell 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christopher P. Martin 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Christina L. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication, Philosophy, 

Political Science 




Peter F. Martin 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Tracy A. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Aimee J. Martineau 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Anais M. Martinez 

School of Management 

Finance 



Class of 1998 369 





Frederick B. Martinez 

School of Management 
Finance 



Margie A. Martinez 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 




Anthony V. Martino 

Arts & Sciences Political 
Science 



Erik J. Martire 

School of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 




Pedro J. Marzo 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Stacy N. Massignan 

Arts & Sciences 

Human Resources 

Psychology 



Jacob A Massoud 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Thomas R Masterman 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jovan M. Mastrofilippo 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 




Christine A. Matava 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Beverly E. Mather 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



James F. Mathias 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jennifer L. Mathisen 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Luis E. Matos 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



370 Seniors 




Olivia A. Matos 


Hajime Matsukata 


Amy M. Matulewicz 


Kate M. Matulewicz 


Darren J. Maupin 


Advancing Studies 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


Psychology 


Computer Science 


Nursing 


Nursing 


Economics 
Finance 





AMdM 




Walter R. Mayer 


Robert A. Mazzeo 


Michael McAndrew 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Biology 


Accounting 


English 



Heather M. McAuley 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Megan A McAvey 
Arts & Sciences 

English 
Germanic Studies 




Robert B. McBriar 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 
English 



Elizabeth A McCabe 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Paul W. McCaffrey 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jill A. McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Class of 1998 371 




~>eniors 




Class of 1993 5' 




Katherine F. McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 


Kathleen E. McCarthy 

School of Management 


Koren H. McCarthy 

School of Management 


Peter McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 


Lucy J McClelland 

Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Marketing 
Theatre Arts 


Finance 
Marketing 


History 
Philosophy 


French 





aM*A 




Jennifer L McClintock 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kerri L. McComiskey 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Matthew C. McConnell 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 



James B. McConville 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Laura A McCormack 

School of Management 
Human Resources 




Laura J. McCormick 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Bryan M. McCorry 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Tori A. McCraine 

Arts 8c Sciences 
Economics 



Gina M. McCreadie 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



374 Seniors 




Rashied McCreary 

Arts & Sciences 
Eng lish 
Sociology 



Courtney R. McCumber 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Mathematics 




Dierdre T. McDonald 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Erica J. McDonald 

School of Management 
Accounting 





Jennifer R. McDonald 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Kerrin E. McDonald 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed., Moderate Spec. 

Needs, Math, Comp. Science 



>bert T. McDonald 

Arts & Sciences 


Megan T. McDonnell 

Arts & Sciences 


Elizabeth A. McDonough 
School of Education 


Communications 
English 


Biology 


Child In Society, Elementary 
Ed., Moderate Special Needs 




Jennifer L. McDonough 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Melissa M. McGann 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
Pre Law 



Matthew J. McGarvey 

Arts & Sciences 

Astro Physics 

Philosophy 



Brian P. McGinn 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Darci R. McGinnis 

Arts & Sciences 
German 



Class of 1998 375 




Matthew T. McGonagle Andrew S. McGowan Jr. 

Arts &C Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Biology Sociology 



thleen A. McGrath 


Aimee E. McGuire 


Colleen M. McGuire 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


History 


Communications 


Accounting 


Political Science 




Marketing 




Devon A. McGuire 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Jennifer L. McKee 

School of Education Human 
Development 





Grainne D. McKeown 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Katie E. McKiernan 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Kevin B. McLane 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Andrew P. McLaughlin 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Carla L. McKeand 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael A. McKenna 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



V 



Cara E. Mclaughlin 

School of Management 
Accounting 



376 Seniors 




iileen M. McLaughlin 


James B. McLean 


Jennifer L. McLean 


Christopher McMahon 


Dennis M. McMahon 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


English 


English 


Political Science 


Biology 


Secondary Education 




Sociology 








isten C. McMahon 


Emily J. McMillin 


Lorinda P. McMorran 


Katherine A. McNabb 


Blair M. McNeill 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Sociology 


Psychology 


Nursing 


English 


Finance 




Peter W. McNeil 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Michelle M. McNulty 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Tucker McNulty 

Arts & Sciences 

Environmental Geoscience 

History 



John P. McPherson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Molly C. Meade 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christopher Megroz 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Douglas J. Mehan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Paulina Mejia 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



W. Alexander McShane 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Robert S. Melnick 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Class of 1998 377 




378 Seniors 





Class of 1998 379 



Daniel P. Middleton 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Mark J. Midura 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Lindsay M. Migliero 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Laurie A. Mignone 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Julie A. Menendez 

School of Management 
Finance 




MelindaJ. Metz 


Michael C. Meyer 


Gavin J. Mhley 


Amie W. Michalek 


Jason T. Micks 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Child In Society 


Finance 


Communications 


Political Science 


Finance 


elementary Education 




English 




Operations 




Lisa J. Miksis 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



380 Seniors 



Jonathan W. Miles 


Kenneth J. Miles 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Sociology 


English 




Philosophy 



Kelly A. Milldy 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Elizabeth L. Millea 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Christopher R. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Donald W. Miller 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Janine D. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Minot: Environmental Studies 



Jessica A. Miller 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Michelle P. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Theatre Arts 



Sean R Mills 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Mark D. Miner 


Marc E. Mingolelli 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


English 


Marketing 




Psychology 




Dana Nicole Minutoli 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Renee M. Miranda 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Class of 1998 381 



Jason W. Mitchell 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Chemistry 



Matthew T. Mitchell 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Tiffany D. Mitchell 

School of Education 

Communication 
Human Development 



Andres Miyares 

School of Management 

Finance 



Aimee N. Moitz 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Stephen R. Mole 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Debra L. Molinari 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 




Elizabeth A. Monaghan 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Belinda E. Moise 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Susan E. Monroe 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Osvaldo C. Monteiro 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Rosemary E. Monteyne : 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Ann Elizabeth Montgomery 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Pre Med 



Laura E Mooney 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



38Z Seniors 



Bridget C. Moore 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Ligia M. Morales 


Amy M. Morin 


Kristin A. Morlok 


Patricia M. Moroney 


Bethany D. Morris 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Business Administration 


Biology 


English 


English 
Psychology 


Art History 




Erica L. Morris 


Samuel H. Morris 


Peter M. Morrow 


Matthew W. Mosher 


Sarita Motiani 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


Finance 


Economics 
Latin 


English 
Human Development 


Communications 

Class of 1998 383 

















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Class of '1998 385 



Sarah R. Mott 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Sociology 



Sean P. Mullen 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Daniel S. Mundy 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Abigail M. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Philippe G. Moufflet 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 





Ryan T. Mueller 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Matthew F. Mugherini 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Courtney A. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Denis D. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jack P. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jennifer Mullen 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Kathleen Mullin 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Minor: Education 




Orlandina Muraca 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
Italian 




Julie B. Murphy 

Arts &C Sciences 
Sociology 



3S6 Seniors 



Matthew W. Murphy 


Nuning T. Murphy 


Patrick J. Murphy 


Brian K. Murray 


Christopher Murra\ 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Psychology 


History 


History 
Secondary Education 


Economics 




Michelle T. Murray 

School of Management 
Human Resources 



Luisa C. Musilli 

Arts & Sciences 

Hispanic Studies 

History 



Aleta M. Mustone 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Scott M. Mutryn 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Justin C. Myers 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 




Daniel J. Najarian 


Carolyn C. Nalitz 


Ho B. Nam 


Christopher Nanos 


Charis B. Narkun 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Sociology 


History 
Political Science 


Communications 


Classical Civilization 


Mathematics 




Pamela I. Narkun 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 


Rima A. Nasrallah 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
Pre Med 


Mark D. Nastus 

Arts & Sciences 
English 


Garo Nazarian 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 


Sean P. Nehill 
Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Class of 1998 387 



Lindsay K. Nelson 


Brian R. Neri 


Thnam K. Net 


Rani J. Neuhill 


Courtney E. Neumann 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Accounting 


Biology 
Pre Med 


Psychology 


English 


Communications 
Education 




Christina J. Neviera 

School of Education 
Child In Society 



Elizabeth M. Newman 

School of Management 
Finance 



Erin E. Newman 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Ele 



Edt 



Samuel S. Ng 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Anna H. Ngo 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Dai Q. Nguyen 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Patrick Nguyen 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Mike S. Ni 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Peter S. Nictakis 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theology 



Josh Niewoehner 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Susan L. Nocella 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Colleen M. Nolan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Victor Ng 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Theology 




Kevin C. Nichols 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Jennifer M. Nolan 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources 



388 Seniors 




Kate J. Nolan 

School of Management 


Meghan Nolan 

Arts & Sciences 


MaryLou G. Noonan 

Advancing Studies 


Joseph E. Norberg Jr 

School of Management 


Matthew M. Norman 
School of Management 


Accounting 
Information Systems 


English 


Business Administration 


Accounting 


Finance 




Jamie A. Norris 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology, Psychology 

Pre Med 







Cedric Notz 

School of Management 
Finance 





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Natasha O. Norton 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Justin Q. Nquyen 

School of Education 

General Education 

Mathematics 





Matthew J. Nugent 

Arts & Sciences 

English 


JefFW. Nulsen 

School of Management 
Economics 


Brian J. O'Boyle 

School of Management 

Finance 
Information Systems 


Alix K. O'Brien 

School of Education 

Computer Science 

Elementary Ed., Math 


Brian D. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Theology 

Class of 1998 389 




Class of 1998 391 




Class of 1998 



Elizabeth G. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
Theater 




Kristin M. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 




Keith C. O'Connor 

School of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 



James D. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Joesph E. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Keri L. O'Brien 

School of Education 

Biology 
Secondary Education 




Man 1 Frances O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kerry A. O'Day 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Fergus M. O'Donoghue 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Karen M. O'Donnell 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kimberly B. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Andrew T. O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Psychology 




Kristin O'Connor 

School of Management 
Finance 




Michael S. O'Donnell 

School of Management 
Information Systems 



David P. O'Hanlon 

School of Management 
Finance 



Timothy P. O'Hara 

Arts &C Sciences 

English 

Mathematics 



Allison O'Keefe 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Shannon E. O'Keefe 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Deidre E. O'Leary 

Arts & Sciences 
History 
Spanish 




Jamie R. O'Leary 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jessica C. O'Leary 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Jeannette M. O'Malley 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Political Science 



Thomas P. O'Malley 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Hugh J. O'Mara 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 




Margaret E. O'Neil 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Operation 



Jennifer F. O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Honors 



RobertO. O'Reilly Jr 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Declan J. O'Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kerry K. O'Sullivan 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Marybeth A. O'Sullivan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Rachel D. Oberdorff 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Caroline Obert 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



James A. Ocampo 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Pre Med 



Emily D. Odachowski 

School of Management 
Information Systems 



Class of 1998 395 



Cheryl A. Ogren 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Engin W. Okaya 

School of Management 

Finance 

InternationalStudies 



Chris Okiwe 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Mindy E. Okura 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 



Christina B. Olayon 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Timothy P. Oldea 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Allyson M. Olewnik 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Steven R. Olivier 

Arts &C Sciences 

English 

Minor: Film Studies 



Christina T. Olansen 

School of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 




Martin D. Ollenschleger 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Kevin J. Osborn 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Catherine A. Ottoboni 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Elaina M. Ouimet 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Meghan B. Owens 

School of Management 
Economics 



Thomas F. Owens 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Isabel M. Pacheco 

School of Management 
Finance 



Eun Ju Esther Pack 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Kerlyne Pacombe 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Jesus S. Pacquing Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael R. Pagan 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Psychology 



396 Seniors 



Susan M. Paglieri 


Benjamin I. Palmer 


Wendy A. Palto 


Peter J. Panagiotopoulos 


Sharon V. Panda 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Sociology 


Finance 


Mathematics 


Finance 
Marketing 


Elementary Education 




Tara Ann Pari 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jennifer K. Park 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



John S. Park 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jong H. Park 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Joohyun Park 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Class of 1998 S97 



Margaret C. Park 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Sammy Park 

School of Management 
Finance 



Sarah A. Park 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Lauren A. Parks 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Robert F. Parks 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




James J. Parmakian 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Robert Pasquesi 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jessica M. Passaretti 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed., Moderate 
Spec. Needs, Human Dev. 




Kristi A. Pasternak 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Manisha M. Patel 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Pragna T. Patel 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Bethany B. Patten 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Matthew C. Patten 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Environmental Geoscience 



Faith P. Patterson 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



398 Seniors 




Eden M. Paul 

School of Education 

Human Devlopment 

Philosophy 



Matthew J. Paul 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Sandra Pavlovic 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael J. Pawlik 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Philosophy 



Charles P. Peacock 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Kristen R. Pedersen 

Arts &C Sciences 
English 



Valerie R. Pellegrini 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Amy M. Pelletier 

School of Management 
Finance 



Ada M. Penabaz 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



John G. Penalosa 

Arts &c Sciences 
Geology 



Celina M. Pepi 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 
Sociology 



Travis W. Percival 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Dayhanara M. Pena 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Alexandria S. Perez 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Class of '1998 399 



John Perkins 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Political Science 



Matthew F. Perry 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Laurie M. Pesapane 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Operations 



Paul R. Peters 


Rachel D. Peter 


\rts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


English 


Nursing 


Psychology 







Liana Petraninova 

Advancing Studies 
business Administration i 




Mark Pham 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



fcl 



M4J±A.h 



John B. Phelan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 
English 



Timothy F. Phelan 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

General Education 



Bryan D. Phelps 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jack Philbin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Craig M. Phillips 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



400 Seniors 




A.J. Picchione 


Andrew J. Piepmeier 


Joseph J. Pierce 


Inga M. Pierson 


Alecia A. Pietig 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Philosophy 


English 
Secondary Education 


Psychology 


Italian Literature 
Minor: Film Studies 


Biochemistry 




Michael S. Pietrasiewicz 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Claudine Pietrucha 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



RickA.R. Pinkham 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Carrie F. Pinkman 

School of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 



Alan D. Pisano 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Donald T. Piscatelli 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jennifer Pish 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Amy L. Planz 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



David V. Pipal 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Kevin J. Plavan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Jansen L. Po 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed., Moderate 

Special Needs, English 



Thomas J. Poirier 

School of Management 
General Management 



Michael J. Polak 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jessica L. Pollio 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Triscia Pompilio 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Political Science 



Class of '1998 401 




Class of 1992, 403 










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Class ox 199S 405 




Anita Poon 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Shana L. Poopor 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Julio E. Portilla 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Antonio Poto 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Marc O. Pouey 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Jill E. Powell 

School of Management 
Finance 



Marvin X. Powell 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Economics 



Michael F. Power 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Emily A. Preheim 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Mary Katherine Presto 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 




Matthew J. Prinn 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 



Katherine J. Prior 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Rebecca L. Procopio 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Matthew J. Proesel 

School of Management 
Finance 



Elena M. Proscia 

School of Education 

Child In Society 
Elementary Education 




Wendy L. Prygoda 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Women's Studies 



Mistie J. Psaledas 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jill A. Puelo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kristin A. Pugh 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Nitin R. Puri 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



406 Seniors 




Kiernan W. Pusey 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 





Robert E. Quinn 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations 




Bernadette Quirk 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Cecily S. Quakenbush 

School of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 



Susan M. Quinlan 

School of Management 
Marketing 



F. Ryan Quinn 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 





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Kevin T. Quinn 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Joseph Quintanilla 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Elisabeth R. Rachal 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Douglas S. Raetz 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations 


Louisa J. Rahilly 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 


Jennifer L. Raichle 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 


Jessica A. Rando 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Minor: Secondary Education 


Michaela K. Ranes 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Class of 1998 407 




Meggen L. Rayla 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Anna K. Raymond 

School of Management 

Human Resources 

Political Science 



Denise D. Raynor 

Arts &C Sciences 
Philosophy 



Thomas S. Rea 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Minor: Irish Studies 



Richard A. Reale Jr. 

Advancing Studies 
Communications 




Maureen E. Reardon 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



■ 

Eric J. Reed 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Maryum Reed 

Arts & Sciences 

General Education 

Sociology 



Christine C. Reedman 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kathryn M. Regan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



408 Seniors 



Michael C. Regan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Matthew E. Reiter 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Theology 



Max A. Ricci 

School of Management 
Finance 



Diane F. Reger 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Matthew J. Reid 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Stacy A. Reid 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Mathematics 



Megan L. Reillv 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Glen M. Reneau 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Michael P. Ricci 

Arts & Sciences 

French 
Political Science 




Darby M. Rice 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Rebecca L. Rice 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed., Moderate 

Special Needs 



Jennifer A. Repik 

School of Management 



Carlos J. Requena 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 
Pre Med 



Jorge L. Ribas 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Class of 1998 409 














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Class of 1998 411 



Brian D. Richardson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kenneth Richardson 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Stephanie R. Richardson 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Susan Riggi 

School of Management 
Finance 



John J. Rilli 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Matthew T. Rittel 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Francisco J. Rivera 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Theology 



David J. Rizzo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Anne J. Roach 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jennifer K. Roach 

Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 

Psychology 



41Z Seniors 




Jennifer L. Robichaud 


Marc R. Robustelli 


Jennifer L. Roche 


Mark W. Roden 


Beth A. Rodenhauser 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


nvironmental Geoscience 


Marketing 


Mathematics 


English 


Human Development 




Melissa A. Rodgerson 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Ian C. Rogan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Melissa A. Roman 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Christopher M. Rodier 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Philosophy 



April L. Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Gail M. Rodriguez 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Colin K. Rogers 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Charise D. Rohm 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Cory L. Roman 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Karen M. Rose 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Sharon K. Rosko 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 



Erin M. Ross 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Stanley J. Roe 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Operations 




Kara C. Roman 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 




Michael A. Rossi 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Class of 1998 413 





■ 



Rocco A. Rossi 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Kristin E. Rost 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed., Moderate 
Special Needs, HumanDev. 



Daniel C. Roth 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Sarah K. Roth 

School of Management 

Finance 

Human Resources 



Sascha G. Rothchild 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 




Amy E. Rourke 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kathleen E. Rourke 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Therese D. Rowe 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



William M. Rowe 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jennifer E. Roy 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Stephen J. Roy 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Daniel P. Ryan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Erin J. Rozelle 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



MarcyJ. Ruda 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jordan M. Ruff 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Margaret M. Ryan 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Matthew W. Ryan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Andrew Ryding 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Brendon A. Ryan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 




Melanie A. Sabo 

School of Management 
Marketing 



414 Seniors 



Michael S. Sacilotto 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Anthony D. Salido 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Mathematics 



Gregg P. Saline 

Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 

Minor: Computer Science 



Khalil G. Samara 

School of Management 
Computer Science 



Jennifer R. Saenz 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Ricardo A. Sagrera 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Dinesh A. Sakhrani 

School of Management 

Finance 

Human Resources, Marketing 



Ricardo J. Sala 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Irene D. Salim 

School of Management 
General Management 



Lindsay E. Saltsgiver 

School of Education 

History 
Secondary Education 



Cristina E. Sanchez-Amyot 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Studio Art 



Cheryl A. Sandison 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Elizabeth A. Sandor 

School of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 



Shirley Y. Sandoval 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Hispanic Experiences 






Class of 1998 415 







Class of 1998 417 




■-. IS Seniors 




Class of 1998 419 





Kristen L. Santa Maria 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Pre Med 



Ryan J. Santomauro 

School of Management 
Accounting 




auren A. Santoro 


Irene Saranteas 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Economics 




Sara E Saukas 


James C. Savage 


Vincent W. Savarese 


Matthew J. Savino 


Giulio A. Savo 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts &C Sciences 


Marketing 


Mathematics 


Psychology 


Philosophy 


English 
History 




Carrie E. Sbrolla 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kathleen L. Scalley 

School of Management 
Finance 



Matthew J. Scamardella 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jennifer L. Schellenger 

Arts & Sciences 
Finance 



Adam A Schiefelbein 

School of Management 
Finance 



420 Seniors 




Damon G. Schmidt 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Warren P. Schmidt 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 



Colleen M. Schmiege 
Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Anne Schneider 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jennifer L. Schoellkopf 

School of Management 
Finance 



Mark 



eting 




Dawn Schottlandt 

School of Management 
Finance 



Allison L. Schrader 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Gretchen M. Schubert 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Elizabeth A. Schultz 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Emily I. Schultz 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Robert E. Schumacher 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Jennifer L. Schuster 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 




Nicholas J. Schwab 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Political Science 



Jonathan B. Schwartz 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Operations 




Class of 1998 411 



Kathryn R. Schwartzstein 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Josephine P. Sciarrino 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Nicholas J. Scobbo 

School of Management 

Human Resources 

Marketing 



Michael D. Scott 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed., English, 
Moderate Special Needs 



Natalie E. Scott 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Shannon M. Seaders 


Danielle C. Seaver 


Margaret E. Seaver 


J. Paul Second 


Phillip J. Seereiter 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Nursing 


Biology 


Elementary Education 


English 


Minor: Film Studies 






Political Science 


Pre Med 





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CarlyJ. Seidewand 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Colleen D. Seliger 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



4ZZ Seniors 



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Amy A. Semenetz 


Jennifer A. Serafyn 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


English 









Allen A. Seto 

School of Management 
Finance 




# 



Jeffrey D. Sgro 

School of Management 
Finance 





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Graham D. Shalgian 


Mark D. Shambura 


Jonathan A. Shapiro 


Charles S. Sharpe 


Katherine Scott Shattuck 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Communications 


Psychology 


History 


Finance 


Elementary Education 
Human Development 





Alexandra H. Shea 


Courtney P. Shea 


David P. Shea 


Susan M. Shea 


Jennifer J. Sheehan 


School of Education 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


-iuman Development 


Nursing 


History 


Human Development 


Germanic Studies 

Class of 1998 4Z3 




i 



Rachel L. Sheehan 

School of Education 

English 
Human Development 



Kenneth A. Shelton 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Susan L. Sheridan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Emily E. Sherman 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jennifer C. Sherwood 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 




Karen E. Sheveland 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Elizabeth A. Shimko 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





Jennifer Shi 

School of Management 
Accounting 




GinaJ. Shin 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed., English 
Moderate Special Need 




Lesley A. Shinay 


Leonid M. Shinchuk 


Samuel N. Shiroff 


Jyoti K. Shrivastava 


Lauren J. Shuell 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Child In Society 


Biochemistry 


Communications 


Economics 


Nursing 


Elementary Education 




History 






4-Z4 Seniors 












Michael D. Silva 


Jared J. Silvia 


Sara A. Simeone 


Jeffrey M. Simmons 


Amy E. Simpson 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Computer Science 


Political Science 


Psychology 


Computer Science 


Political Science 




Jennifer A. Simpson 


Eric A. Singer 


Andrew J. Sinnott 


Katie E. Sinnott 


Michael J. Siravo 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Biology 


Finance 


Mathematics 
Secondary Education 


Biochemistry 




Supanee Sirivallop 


Sarah H. Skeie 


Amanda L. Skeith 


Ryan P. Skenyon 


Shawna D. Skinner 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Economics 


English 


Biology 


Accounting 


Finance 


Finance 












Nathan A. Sklarz 

School of Management 
Marketing 


Jennifer J. Skoczelas 

Arts & Sciences 
English 


Steven V. Skoczylas 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 


Rebecca A. Slade 

School of Management 
Accounting 


John R. Slattery 

Arts & Sciences 

Internationa] Studies 

Political Science 

Class of 1998 4Z5 




Margaret M. Slattery 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Darlene D. Sliva 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jennifer Sliva 

School of Management 
Finance 
Marketing 



Kristina M. Smarz 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theatre Arts 




Donald Smith 

School of Education 

English, Human Dev., 

Sociology 



Leanne R. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Loren A. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Morgan C. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Andrea L. Smith 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Psychology 




Lauren M. Snedeker 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Amy L. Snyder 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Christina Y. Song 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Beth-Ann Snyder 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 



Stephen S. Sobhi 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Joan C. Solomon 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Psychology 



Laura A. Solt 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Amy L. Sorokolit 

School of Management 

Finance 

Minor: International Studies 



Beth A. Sorokolit 

School of Education 

Child In Society 
Elementary Education 



Alejandro Soto 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Rodrigo Soto 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Seniors 




Veronica J. Sova 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Peter W. Spaulding 

School of Management 
Human Resources 



Emily C. Speelmon 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Kerry M. Spellman 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Jennifer D. Spencer 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Minor: Women's Studies 




Jeremy T. Spencer 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Pre Med 




Patricia A. Spergl 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 





Michael S. Spenlinhauer 

School of Management 

General Management 




Amy E. Spiegel 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Peter L. Spinelli 

School of Management 

Economics, Finance, 

Psychology 



Stephanie Spirer 

Advancing Studies 
Psychology 



Kelly A. Spratt 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Marketing 



Bianca N. Squitieri 
School of Education 

Child In Society 
Elementar)' Education 



Feddy F. St. Pierre 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
Nursing; 



Class of 1998 4Z7 













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Damian J. Stafford 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Fotios A. Stamos 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Karlen L. Stanziale 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Robert D. Stapleton 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Children's Literature 



Ryan A. Stark 

Arts & Sciences 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Paul M. Stec 

School of Management 

Finance 



Lisa M. Stagno 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Elizabeth R. Stanley 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Amanda P. Steege 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Catherine J. Steele 

Arts & Sciences 
English 


Mark J. Steffen 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 


Katrina A. Steiling 

Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 

Psychology 


Jason R. Steiner 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 


Lesley E. Steinman 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 


428 Seniors 











Gregory P. Stepka 


Brett J Sterenson 


Robert A. Stevens 


Mark A. Stewart 


George V. Stiehl 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Marketing 


Psychology 


Political Science 


Economics 


Pre Dental 












Bradford D. Stroesser 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Political Science 



Sarah W. Streiff 

Arts & Sciences 
Theatre 



Sarah J. Strong 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Heidi A. Stokes 

School of Management 

Human Resources 

Marketing 




Rebecca E. Stronach 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 




Janet E. Strozeski 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Thomas P. Stone 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jamie Stonick 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
Pre Med 



Daniel E. Straffi 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Operations 




Class of 1998 429 




Class of 199S 431 




Class of 1998 433 







Amy M. Stuyniski 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Izabela E. Suchecki 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Brian P. Suffoletto 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jennifer Suh 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Brian C. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Erin C. Sullivan 


John M. Sullivan 


Kevin A. Sullivan 


Michael M. Sullivan 


Shannon Sullivan 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Finance 


English 
History 


Accounting 


Communications 





Amy C. Sundman 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Brian M. Suskiewicz 

Arts & Sciences 
History 







m 



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William E. Suter 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 
Marketing 



Emily M. Sutton 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



434 beniors 




Jennifer Suzara 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Minor: Education 



Garrett T. Swanberg 
Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Kara L. Swanson 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Glen A. Tagliamonte 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Eugene F. Swanzey 

Arts & Sciences 

English 





Kerri N. Sweeney 


Sean M. Sweeney 


Joelle M. Sweeney 


David A. Tafuto 


Michael A. Taggart 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Biology 


Economics 
English 


Biology 
Pre Veterinary 


Philosophy 


History 




Amy L. Tamborlane 

Arts &C Sciences 
English 



Christopher J. Tamulis 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Tushar Tanna 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Erin J. Tapper 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Class of 1998 4-35 




*aA 



Robert P. Tardio 


Andrew Taylor 


Beth A. Taylor 


Anthony C. Tecce 


Francesca M. Tedesco 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Economics 


Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 


Computer Science 


Political Science 




Andrew R. Teed 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Amy M. Tenney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





Casey M. Templeton 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Shan Mae Teo 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Robyn Terrana 

School of Management 

Finance 

Human Resources 


Michael E. Terry 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Computer Science 


Connie -Lynn Tessitore 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 


Jennifer M. Thalmann 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Sociology 


Kerry Ann Thayer 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 


436 Seniors 












*M* 



John D. Thiel 


Cindy Thoennessen 


Shannon B. Thoke 


Brian J. Thomas 


Jason A. Thomas 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Communications 


Accounting 


Communications 


Communications 




English 


Finance 


English 


Minor: Film Studies 




Lauren E. Thomas 


Sara E. Thomas 


William S. Thomas III 


Chantel S. Thompson 


Jennifer L. Thompson 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


English 


Communications 


English 


Information Systems 


Finance 




Sociology 




Marketing 






Sandra Tibaldeo 


Perla Tirado 


Elizabeth L. Tobey 


Emily Y. Tom 


Lisa M. Tonon 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Human Development 


Philosophy 


Communications 


History 


Child In Society 


Spanish 


Theology 


Sociology 




Elementary Education 




Shannon E. Toomey 

School of Education 

Computer Science, 

Elementary Ed., Math 




Jennifer K. Toran 

School of Education 

Computer Science, 

Elementary Ed., Math 



Christine A. Torchen 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Katherine M. Toukhy 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Psychology 



Laura H. Towne 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Class of 1998 437 




Class of 199S 439 



Laurie M. Townsend 


Meghan A. Tracey 


Megan K. Tracy 


Jennifer A. Traficanti 


Jeffrey M. Trapani 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Human Development 


Mathematics 


Biology 


Psychology 


Biology 




Keith M. Traverse 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer L. Treglia 

School of Management 

Human Resources 

Finance 



Kimberly A. Trespicio 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Kathryn P. Trimble 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Jessica L. Tripp 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 




Kellie Turner 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Peter N Trivelas 


Michael Troy 


Tomen Tse 


Paulette R. Tucciarone 


Troy A. Turick 


School of Management 


Arts &C Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


History 


Marketing 


Biology 


Mathematics 


Philosophy 








Psychology 




Margaret M. Turner 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



asSK 
Ryan M. Turner 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Gretel A. Twombly 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Katherine B. Tytus 

Arts & Sciences 

American Studies 

History 



440 Seniors 



Peter D. Tziros 


Austin J. Ulep 


Aparna Upadhyay 


Seth C. Upson 


Jodie Urcioli 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts &: Sciences 


Biology 


Sociology 


Economics 
Political Science 


Marketing 


Child In Society 
Elementary Education 




Amanda L. Urkiel 

Atts & Sciences 

Communications 

Sociology 




Sujal K. Vaidya 

Arts & Sciences 
History 





Darren J. Ursino 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Minor: Film 




Claudia M. Valencia 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Marketing 




Joseph F. Valenti 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 


Stephen J. Valentine 

Arts & Sciences 
English 


Marie- Yves S. Valme-Louis 

Advancing Studies 
Accounting 


Amy Celeste Van Eepoel 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 


David R. Van Wagner 

School of Management 
Economics 

Class of 199$ 441 




Christopher Vance 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Elizabeth A. Vandermaelen 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Patrick M. Vannelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Dina Varvatsoulis 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Aarti Vaswani 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Luca E. Venza 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 
Theology 



Susan J. Verebi 

School of Management 
Finance 



Charles J. Vernon 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Ereka Vetrini 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Mary Elizabeth Vieira 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



44Z Seniors 




Christopher Viens 


Maggie D. Villamana 


Edward J. Villareal 


Santiago Villarreal 


Stephanie N. Vincent 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Computer Science 


Biochemistry 


Accounting 


Economics 
Finance 


History 




Jessica R. Violette 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Eleanna Virvidaki 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Kara A. Visconti 

Arts & Sciences 
Management Psychology 



Ryan J. Vital 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Nathan V. Vitaro 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Elena K. Vizvary 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Amanda J. Voetsch 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Mark N. Von Treskow 

School of Management 
Finance 





Alyssa A. Vore 

School of Management 
Finance 



Meghan G. Voris 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Gytis K. Vygantas 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Lisa M. Wagner 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Ryan C. Wagner 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Michael P. Walden 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Matthew S. Waldron 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Class of 1998 443 



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Class of 1998 445 




Class of '1998 447 




Class of 1998 449 



Jessica F. Wall 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 



Kristen K. Wallace 

School of Management 
Finance 



Christopher Walsh 

Advancing Studies 
English 



Colleen R. Walsh 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Edward J. Walsh 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Laura S. Walsh 


Tyler P. Walsh 


Peter A. Walter 


Stephanie E. Walter 


Kathleen M. Walters 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


rly Childhood Education 


English 


Economics 


Nursing 


Chemistry 


Human Development 








Secondary Education 





Naomi D. Walton 

School of Education 

Human Development 



' 



Seaver T. Wang 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



' V 1 

dM4 




Gary M. Ward 

School of Management 
Marketing 



John W. Ward 

School of Management 
Finance 



4-50 Seniors 




Amy E. Wasgatt 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Andrea L. Waterhouse 

School of Management 
Finance 




Laura L. Waterhouse 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 



Michelle D. Waters 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Sociology 





Anne R. Watson 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Meghan Watson 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kristina A. Weaver 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Rebecca M. Weaver 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Theology 



Christina M. Weber 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




AsMA 




imothy R. Weeks 

Arts & Sciences 
English 


Christopher K. Weidling 

School of Management 
Finance 


Matthew E. Weinand 

Arts & Sciences 

Hispanic Studies 

Sociology 


Michael S. Weir 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations 


Robert A. Weisman 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Class of '1998 451 



Heather M. Welch 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jennifer L. Wentworth 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Kelly M. Welch 

School of Education 

Child In Society 
Human Development 



Michele A. Welch 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Alison N. Wellman 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Matthew D. Wentland 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Laura A. Werts 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Mary Elizabeth Weston 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Elizabeth A. Whitaker 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jennifer A. White 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Katherine A. White 

School of Education 

American Heritage 

Early Childhood 



Katie F. Williams 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Braden O. Wilhelm 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Elizabeth P. Wilkins 

Arts & Sciences 

Environmental Science 

Sociology 



Christopher Williams 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Monique P. Williams 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Anne Williamson 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Marketing 



Amy E. Williamson 

Arts &C Sciences 
Psychology 



Jason A. Williams 

Arts &C Sciences 
Political Science 




Brendan M. Williamson 

School of Management 
Finance 



45Z Seniors 



Amy A. Wilson 


Thomas H. Winner 


Andrew R. Wiseman 


Anthony T. Wladyka 


Katharine N. Wolf 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts &C Sciences 


English 


English 
History 


English 


Philosophy 
Political Science 


Psychology 




Garland M. Wong 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Julie Wong 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Mollie Wong 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Samantha S. Wong 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Danielle B. Wood 

School of Management 
General Management 



Class of 1998 453 




lass of 1998 455 





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Terrance Q. Woodard 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Amy E. Woodman 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





m \jk m 



Duane H. Woodward 


Brendon M. Worley 


Heather A. Wright 


Juliet D. Xifaras 


Rebecca R. Yalmokas 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


History 
Political Science 


Marketing 
Human Development 


Human Development 


Psychology 




Abigail C. Yap 

Arts &C Sciences 
Psychology 



Stephen M. Yap 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer M. Yau 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations 



Jean Yeung 

School of Management 
Finance 



Susanna S. Yi 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



456 Seniors 



Michelle Yip 


Joshua D. Yocum 


Matthew S. Yosca 


Zakia A. Young 


Rana El Yousef 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Economics 


English 
Minor: Irish Studies 


English 


Chemistry 




Christy L. Yuri 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Daniel R. Zacharias 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christopher Zagar 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jennifer A. Zaldivar 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Alison M. Zambelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Nicole C. Zappala 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Women's Studies 


Ani Zargarian 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Amy C. Zaro 

Arts &c Sciences 
History 



Tim D. Zeglin 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Class of 1998 457 



Kevin R. Zelechoski 


Michelle A. Zeller 


Qi Yu Zhong 


David C. Zinn 


Amy Zolad 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Psychology 


Accounting 
Economics 


Philosophy 


English 








Elizabeth A. Zukowski 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Rebecca L. Zychowski 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Brian A. Callery, Jr. 


Colleen Patrice McNamara 


Michael David Williams 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


English 


English 
Communications 



458 Seniors 




Class of 1998 459 




I 




Class of 1998 461 



Class Of 19 98 



Osman M. Abdelrahman 


Mary Au 


Markell Kenyatta Blount 


Brendan Campbell 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


Germanic Studies 


Sociology 


English 


Isabel le A. Acra 


Rada Ayrapetova 


David Raymond Booher 


Nathaniel Carney 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Communications 


Communications 
English 


Philosophy 


Danielle S. Adams 


Paula E. Bannerman 




Raymond P. Castro 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


John Francis Boyce 


School of Management 


Economics 


Elem. Moderate Special Needs 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 




Human Development 


Sociology 




Ra-Mu A. Al-Mahdi 






Samantha K. Cerusici-Rubii 


School of Management 


Gregory Ricorda Bartlett 


Jennifer L. Bradford 


School of Education 


Marketing 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Elementary Education 




Mathematics 


Psychology 


Human Development 


John A. Allan 


Secondary Education 






Arts & Sciences 




Rachel Betsy Bradley 


Seungyun Cha 


Philosophy 


Jill Robyn Bauland 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 




School of Management 


Accounting 


Computer Science 


Gabriel K. Altbach 


Finance 






Arts & Sciences 




Rachel M. Bregman 


Jeong-Youn Chang 


History 


Daniel S. Beaton 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Sociology 


Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 


Human Development 


Biology 


Charles Andrew Amara 


Sociology 


Jennifer C. Bridges 


Yung-Hsuan Anita Chang ; 


Arts & Sciences 




Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Chemistry 


Brent Bell 

School of Management 


Sociology 


Communications 


Yee Ting Ang 


Finance 


Dominic F. Brodeur 


Sylvia J. Chao 


School of Management 


Operations 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 




Marketing 


Communications 


Marketing 


Stephen Ardis Bell 








Arts & Sciences 


Edward R. Bucciarelli 


Fanny Cheng 


Armand C. Aponte 


Mathematics 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 




Studio Art 


Biochemistry 


Finance 


Michael S. Bellaran 






Psychology 


Arts & Sciences 


Jamie Brook Buckley 


Patrick S. Chu 




History 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


George O. Aragon 


Philosophy 


Economics 


Accounting 


School of Management 








Economics 


Lorena Catalina Bendeck 


Matthew Paul Buckley 


Eugene B. Chung 


Finance 


School of Management 


School of Education 


School of Management 




Economics 


English 


Finance 


Asgeir Asgeirsson 




Secondary Education 




School of Management 


Cindy Lee Beyer 




Jihae Chung 


Economics 


Arts & Sciences 


Michelle E. Butte 


Arts & Sciences 




Mathematics 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 






Biochemistry 


Mathematics 


46Z Seniors 









Albertina Maria Cisneros 

School of Management 
Finance 

Derick Cividini 

School of Management 
Finance 

John M. Cofran 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 

Lynn Colpitts 

Arts & Sciences 

Ftench 
Hispanic Studies 

Nancy A. Conde 

Atts &C Sciences 
Sociology 

Michael B. Coon 

School of Education 
Human Development 

Danielle L. Costa 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Economics 

Brad Costello 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Karyn Ann Coveney 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Catherine Craig 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Ian Cross 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

, Heather Crummer 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 

Kathleen De La Paz 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Taryn E. Dean 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Christopher J. Deangelis 

School of Management 
Computer Science 

Rosanna Delverme 

Arts & Sciences 

Hispanic Studies 

Psychology 

Ryan N. Demasi 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 

Dianne A. Denommee 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Anthony J. Depinto 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Alfredo R. Dequesada 

School of Management 

General Management 

Theatre Arts 

James Desantis 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Nikolas Desena 

School of Management 
Human Resources 

Christine M. Di Blasi 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 

Hien M. Dinh 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Luana Disarra 

School of Management 

Economics 

Political Science 

Megan L. Dolan 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 



Bradley Donohue 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theatre Arts 

Jean Marie Donohue 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Vana Douglas 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Jessica M. Downey 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Lee Duong 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 

Veronica M. Dupont 

Arts & Sciences 
Information Systems 

Jeffrey D. Eaton 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

David Eberts 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Robert C. Edmonds 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Rana El-Yousef 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 

Christina Engebak 

Arts & Sciences 
Finance 

Jon Erario 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Theatre Arts 

William A. Evans 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Artemisia Evdemon 

Arts &c Sciences 

Political Science 

Slavic Studies 

Brian C. Ewing 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Lucia P. Fankhanel 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 

Isaac E. Fellows 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Tanya M. Fernandes 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Michael J. Ferrara 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theatre Arts 

Matthew F. Ferrelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Christopher P. Figoni 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations 

Kevin M. Finn 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Hasan A. Fitaihi 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 

Patrick Eugene Flanigan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Eric F. Fonacier 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Class of 1998 463 



Marci H. Francis 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 

Albert V. Furman 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Political Science 

Khalilah Gambrell 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Michael T. Gardikas 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Edmund H. Gardner 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 

Micael A. Garrido 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Timothy V. Gavin 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 

Walter W.Gaylor 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 

Megan Fields Gayman 

School of Education 

Child and Society 

Elem. Moderate Special Needs 

Christine A. Ghione 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Leo J. Gibson 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Dorcas J. Gordon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael C. Gostkowski 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Karen B. Goulakos 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Romayne M. Grace 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Antonio C. Granger 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Amy R. Guerin 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Katherine C. Guevara 

Arts & Sciences 

French 

Theatre Arts 

Lisbet Gutierrez 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Elizabeth N. Hagyard 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 

Matthew D. Halverson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Jennifer Hamilton 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Studio Art 

Kimberly L. Hanoian 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Dennis Harding 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Karen T. Harrington 

School of Management 

Human Resources 

Marketing 



Benjamin S. Harris 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Avak O. Hasratian 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Sociology 

Aleka Hatziiliades 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Lindsay Hayes 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Political Science 

Larry Hernandez 

School of Management 
Finance 

Christina A. Hewes 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Justin E. Housman 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Jung-Hwa Rochelle Hue 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Information Systems 

Seiichiro Ikeno 

School of Management 

Finance 

Informtion Systems 

Thomas M. James 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Lesley Jean-Paul 

School of Management 
Finance 

Michael A. Jeffers 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



464 Seniors 



Brian K. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
French 

Elizabeth E. Johnson 

School of Education 

Biology 

Elem. Interm. Special Needs 

Ryan M. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 

Finance 

Psychology 

Scott D. Johnson 

School of Management 
Psychology 

Travis E. Kanaly 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

TaraKane 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Allison B. Kaplan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Jonathan W. Katchen 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 

Anastassios Kavalieratos 

School of Management 
Operations 

Roger F. Killer 

School of Management 
Computer Science 

Jae J. Kim 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Peter Byong Jin Kim 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Theodore E. Kim 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Richard N. Kimball 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Joan F. Kingson 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Jeffrey M. Klco 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 

David E. Kotcher 

School of Management 
Finance 

Jennifer Kovacevich 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Sociology 

Andrew J. Kovacs 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 

Constantinos P. Kyrkinis 

School of Management 
Finance 

Andrea Laroque 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Charles Zhuo Lau 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 

Michael D. LeBlanc 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Christopher Dean LeGras 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Political Science 

Amy Yu Han Lee 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Bert Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Steven Lee 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Stefano Thomas Lindt 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 

Diana Litfin 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Melissa Lynne Loeber 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Amilcar Martins Lopes 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Ian Lundgren 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Weylan L. Ma 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Meredith A. MacDonald 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 

Emily Elizabeth Maich 

School of Education 
Elem. Interm. Special Needs 

Brendan James Mannix 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Jocelyn M. Manuel 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 

Jennifer R. Mardis 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Nicholas A. Martz 

Arts & Sciences 
Germanic Studies 



Abigail B. H. Marwood 

Arts &: Sciences 
Philosophy 

Anya Jeanne Maurer 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Eva L. Maynard 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Theresa Ann Mazza 

School of Education 
Human Development 

Jill Annemarie McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

William Charles McAlaine 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Brendan J. McDonald 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Amy Beth McGann 

School of Management 
Finance 

Sheila M. McMahon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Colleen P. McNamara 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Thomas McNulty 

Arts & Sciences 

Environmental Geoscience 

History 

Brian P. McPartland 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 

Kristen B. Melchin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Johann Mendoza 

School of Management 

Economics, Finance, and 

Information Systems 

Vincent P. Meoli 

Arts &: Sciences 
Biochemistry 

Ryan Miller 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Michael J. Moan 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 

Kenneth G. Mohammed 

School of Management 
Finance 

Manuel Mondedeu Insunza 

School of Management 

Economics, Finance, and 

Operations 

Robin K. Mooy 

School of Education 

Elem. Moderate Special Needs 

English 

Adam Lee Munder 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Beatriz Eugenia Munoz 

School of Management 
Economics 

Dimitri Lilana Musing 

School of Management 
Finance 

David A. Myers 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Joshua Daniel Nasbe 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Political Science 



Class of 1998 465 



Joshua Thomas Nelson 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Sarah Rathbun Nelson 

School of Management 
Finance 

Steven Warren Nelson 

School of Management 

Rani J. Neutill 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Justin Quoc Nguyen 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 

Joanne S. Nititham 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Jennifer Lynne Nowicki 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Colleen A. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Noel E. O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Timothy Patrick O'Dea 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 

Denny Einskader Oh 

School of Management 

Pamela Quaknine 

School of Management 

Kim Mersina Pantos 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Jong-il Park 

School of Management 
Finance Economics 



466 Seniors 



Patricia Cho Park 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Psychology 

Jeffrey Charlton Parris 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Eileen Pastora 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Political Science 

Payal Anil Patel 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Alexander Curtis Paulson 

School of Management 

Human Resources 

Marketing 

Michael A. Pereira 

School of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 

Alejardno Manuel Perez 

School of Management 
Biology 

Manuel A. Pietrantoni 

Arts & Sciences 

Hispanic Studies 

Philosophy 

Michael J. Poll ak 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 

Xavier F. Racine 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Shana Kathleen Rahavy 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Andrew Martin Reilly 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Jane Elizabeth Ricci 

School of Management 



Marilu S. Rivas 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Political Science 

Rebecca Catherine Rowe 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 

Eric J. Rucinski 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 

Monica J. Rueda 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Deirdre Mary Ryan 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Erin Smith Ryan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Maria Cristina Salas 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Mark William Samale 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 

Barbara A. Santoro 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Lori Ann Sarsfield 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

John Kyle Schmid 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Amy Schreiber 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Jeremy Clay Schubert 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Robert Ross Seelos 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Susan Elizabeth Sevier 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Eric Michael Schaughnessy 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Kerrie Lynn Sheldon 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Jonathan David Shively 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 

Peter Francis Simons 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Michael Leonard Simpson i 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Political Science 

Prem J. Singh 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 

John B. Skelton 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kevin A. Small 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Kelli Marie Smith 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Peter John Soreca 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Brian Robert Soucek 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 



Elizabeth K. Stevenson 

Arts &C Sciences 
Biology 
English 

Darren Nathan Streiler 

School of Management 
Finance 

Weili Su 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Taewon Suh 

Arts & Sciences 

Accounting 

Informations Systems 

Joshua David Sullivan 

School of Education 

History 
Human Development 

Sara Stuart Sullivan 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 

Christopher D. Takacs 

School of Managment 
Finance 

Montien Duke Tantakit 

School of Managment 
Finance 

Cathy Fung Hin Tao 

School of Managment 
Finance 

Alex Ta-wei Teng 

School of Managment 

Accounting 

Computer Science 

Evagelia Terzopoulos 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Kevin Daniel Tessner 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Psychology 



Jamie Lynn Thompson 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 

Huguette M. Thornton 

Arts & Sciences 

French 
Political Science 

Melannies Tirado 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Shalom Rashene Tolefree 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Ilianai Torres 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Julia Mong Tran 

Arts & Sciences Political 

Science 

Theresa-thu P. Tran School 

of Nursing Nursing 

Paul R. Trojano 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Maria Cristina Trujillo 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 

Kathleen Therese Tully 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 

Ming-lun Tung 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Finance 

Deanna Sharlene Turnbull 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Gregory Stanley Tzouros 

Arts & Sciences Political 
Science 



Kathleen M. Ursini 

Arts &: Sciences 
English 

Scott M. Van Sickle 

School of Management 
Finance 

Isabel C. Varas 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Chastity Versceri 

School of Education 

Elem. Moderate Special Needs 

Sociology 

Elizabeth Nell Vilardi 

School of Management 
Finance 

Matthew John Waas 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Jermaine Anthony Walker 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

William J. Wallace 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Patrick D. Walsh 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Lee A. Walter 

School of Management 
Finance 

Victor F. Weber 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

David H. Wharton 

School of Management 
Finance 

Patrick Erni Whitesell 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 



Saman D. Wickramasinghe 

Arts &: Sciences 
History 

Justin David Wiener 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Amy Beth Williams 

School of Education 

Child and Society 

Elem. Moderate Special Needs 

Jill C. Winters 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Andrea J. Witt 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Lia G. Woo 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Meghan E. C. Woody 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Willie Zavier Wright 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Patrick Kim Yin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Christine Kwan Yee Yuen 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 

Anthony M. Zizza 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Theology 

Brian Joseph Zumbano 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Class of 1998 4-67 




Class of 1998 469 



Platinum Benefactors 



Mr. Mid, Mrs. Philips Adler 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Allegrettv 

Kir it and Qillian Antanl 

Lindas and Ranald Belio 

Jerry and Diane Bleuins 

Dr. and Mrs. B. Eugene Brady 

Dr. and Mrs. Williams L Bresonis 

Dr. and Mrs. Ronald P. Byank 

Charles and Qlorios dough 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Craig Coats, Jr. 

Thomas R.. and Rosemary Coleman 

Michael T and Patricias A. Cowhia 

Bob and Qerri Craws 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneths Burnett Cutter 

Paul and CamUle Daqui 

Johns Diamont 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Diforio 

David and Cheryl EcLdings 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank English 

Meilianos Ernaumn 

Mr. and Mrs. Dans Fargo 

Carl and Deborah Ferraros 

Mr. and Mrs. Williams J. Fienups 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Q. Friedman 



Paul A. Qloirer 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Qoffjjr. 

Johns C. and Mary Anns Hannos 

Wy lis and Kay Holmes 

DoKsand Cathey Humphreys 

Bill and MasUreenJandovibc 

Joseph J. and DianesM. Kelley 

Ackim and Paulines Knust 

Mr. and Mrs. Qary Leeds 

Ckang-Sheng Lin 

Daniel and Kathleens Max>Donald 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Martin 

Mr. and Mrs. James P. McAts'ey 

Dan and Helens Mekan 

Kathy and Lous MetHer 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Milleos 

Dr. and Mrs. Patricks J. Murphy Ut 

Dr. and Mrs. John Niidol 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Thomas O'Briens 

Qiles and Marilyns O'Keefe 

Bob ('98) and Brian ('99) O'Reilly 

John and Kathleens Pattens 

Connie Peirce 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Polah, Sr. 



470 Vlatinum Benefactors 



Platinum Benefactors 



Peggy and Tom Pollocks 

Moms, Dad, Wayne-, Qrandmos, 

and Doug Pryqodas 

Caroi and Chuck Rlni, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Roth 

John W. Schubert 

Paul and Qrace> Schultz, 

Nicholas J. and Mary L Scobbo 

Jvmand D'Arcy Secord 

James and Mary Sharps 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Sheostll 

LucHUs DlZ>omenlco and Larry D. Spencer 

Martins and Elizabeth Teevan 

Judith and Steve- Thomas 

Qary and Kathy Thompson, 

Mr. and Mrs. John and CheryL 

Thompson- Draper 

The, Tracy family-Ed, Dolores, Carrie,, Ted, Megan 

('98), Chuck, Jim and Tom, 

DokkasM. Paolino Urciuolis'74 and 

Robert A. UrciuolL 

Kathryn, Richard, and Matthew Visconti 

JohnM. Voetsch 

Alex and Luc Walter 

Brum Whitekousses 



Tlatinum Benefactors 471 





(Dr. andMrs. Joseph Aleardi 

(Eileen 1/. Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. MarfcP. Andreotta 

Mr. and Mrs. AffredAngiofa 

Anthony 'T.Anieffo 

(Jregory(P. Bar her. Class of W 

Marge and Tom 'Barrett 

Mrs. W. Craig Bennett 

Trimona and (JulaS Bhavnani 

Mr. and Mrs. (Fran/<i W. Bode 

(Dr. and Mrs. Edward Bofeslq/ 

Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Bonayuide 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward B. Brads treet 

(Dr. and Mrs. (\fj. Bustros 

Churchiff Carey 

Edward and Anne Can 

'Pauline and (Richard Charpentier 

Mr. and Mrs. (RpffClasson 

(Kathleen and (Richard Coffins 

(Dr. and Mrs. (Peter OF. Coffins 

Judge and Mrs. (Af. (Peter Conforti 

John and Anne Coo fey 

(Dr. and Mrs. (RpSertE. Crootof 

(fFifdye and Jim Cross 

Mr. and Mrs. Antonio A. Cruz 

Joe and Cindy B)ays 

A fain (J. (Denofy 

Mr. andMrs. Jran^BfeSanto 

Mr. andMrs. <Dennis (DiMarzio 

<Dr. andMrs. A. <Di(Paofo 

CofomSo and (Karen (DiSafvatore, Jr. 



Mr. andMrs. (JeorgeJ. (Doehner 

Christina (Domecq 

Joan and John J. B)onohue 

John and Susan (Dros/(ps/Q 

Edward and Joanne (Dunphy 

£>r. andMrs. (RpBertA. <DurBin 

Jaf(e andjiona ESerts 

Mr. andMrs. Wiffiamlti. Effis 

Mr. andMrs. Joseph J. J^^accone 

Brian J. (£S '66) and Barbara y. (Farreff 

J r efayo J : amify 

Mr. andMrs. (Richard M. (Fiorito 

Mr andMrs. Edward (J. (Flaherty 

Jim and(J\[ancy (Foley 

Bo 5 and Margaret (Foschi 

B)r. AfBertM. CfafaBurda 

John andCarofiJaffqgher 

Mr. andMrs. Martin (R. Cjifmartin 

(Dr. andMrs. Stephen (Jiordano 

(J\(prman and Judy (JfassBerg 

Mr. andMrs. Joef (Jo fdhfatt 

(Dr. andMrs. Ernesto (Jofdman 

Chris and'Kathy (Joufd 

Mr. andMrs. "David (T. griffith 

(Dr. andMrs. Carfos(R (Juerra 

(H(annoushJewefers - Efias OFannoush 

Carofand(RpchlJFiffenBrand 

(Ta((eshi JFirose 

Mr. andMrs. (Richard Jenny 

Mr. andMrs. Stanefy (T. (J(awamura 

(Richard and Pamela (/(ehoe 

(Toe (H. JQm, M.(D. 



47 Z Cold Benefactors 



GO£JD &EtfEJ%CIO!R$ 



Jim and r Diane T(pncn 

Mary (J(rqgyef 

(Dorothy La(Bossiere Def(Jiudice 

Mr. and Mrs. Saverio Lacroce 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles J. Lancefotta, Jr. 

DeSSy and Steve Landyraher 

Mr. and (Mrs. JLiujustus La(Rpcca 

Dr. JLffan C. Levy 

Dr. and Mrs. Jran/^JL. Lizzi 

(Bo 6 and(/(athy Long 
Laurence (J. and (Jail J r . Long 

David (R. Lovejoy 
Mr. and Mrs. (Royer M. Lynch 
(Tom and (Pat Lynch andj r amify 

(Roy 'P. Maine ffi I 

Mr. and Mrs. Jl56oudMamish 

Suzanne and Joseph Martin 

(RpSert Deeyan Matava 

Mr. and Mrs. (Ernest J. Maupin 

Mr. and Mrs. (RpSert 1. ' McDonafd 

Mr. and Mrs. ([homos T. McLaiujhfin, Sr. 

Dennis and(Bev McMahon 

Jim and(ReffyMcShane 

(Evan andCarofynJLffen Meftzer 

Joefandjan Mifler 
Mr. and Mrs. WiffiamJL. Mifler 

Mr. and Mrs. David Miner 

Wiffiam andLyanne Monfcnan 

Mr. and Mrs. (Thomas (P. Moroney 

John and Monica Murphy 

(RpSert andDenise (hfajarian 

Mr. and Mrs. DaniefJL. (Alichots 



Dr. and Mrs. PatriciJ. O'Dea 

Patric^and 9\(preen O'Donqyhue 

Mr and Mrs. Dennis J. OLeary 

Dr. and Mrs. Wiffiam L. O'tyiffand Jamify 

Jose(PenaSaz 

John and Catherine Pfeiffer 

Jfenri and(h[adine Pouey 

Mr. and Mrs. Jran/^Proscia 

Diane and Chris (Psaledas - Mis tie '98 

Mr. and Mrs. 'Benito Qucvedo 

Joe and(Peyyy Quirfi 

Stanley and Judith (Reedman 

Ejfward and (Jin^er (Reiter 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. (Ricci 

(Raimundo (Riojas 

Lourdes Safido 

John J 7 . andJLfice J. SchauS 

Donald and Judy Scott 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard J. Serafino 

Linda and Dona fdStecf 

Mr. and Mrs. (Richard Stuynislq 

Mr. and Mrs. Ihomasy.Suh 

(Hugh and Maureen Taylor 

JohnD.lhieC 

(Richard and (Pamela Ihoennessen 

Mr. and Mrs. Wiffiam S 'Thomas, Jr. 

DiosdadoE Zllcp 

Joe and Joyce Zlrsino 

Martin andJLnne Welch 

Dr. and Mrs. JohnS. Wefts 

(Randy and Joan Zisfer 

Gold Benefactors 473 



ilver Benefactors 



Dr. and Mrs. E. Abad 

Charles and Barbara Agli 

Janice E. Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Andrighetto 

Sandra and Paul Angeli 

Dr. and Mrs. David J. Angus 

Dr. and Mrs. Gerald S. Armstrong 

Dr. and Mrs. Ramzi Assad 

Joan Behonick 

Leonard and Donna Bellezza 

Thomas J. Bligh 

The Bodkin Family 

Mr. and Mrs. T.M. Bogo 

MaryAnn and Patrick Brannigan 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Brauman 

John and Trish Brennan 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore P. Brogowski 

Gregory and Christine Brzezinski 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Burns 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Carey 

Vito and Maureen Catanese 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Caterino 

Dr. and Mrs. Lachman Chablani 

Joyce E. Charles 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Connelly 

Robert A. Conti 

James and Mary A. Cremins 

Louise and Buzz Cue 

Peter and Marcia Cunningham 

Patricia A. Curran 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Curran 

Lou and Jenny Dagostine 

Mr. and Mrs. James P. Day 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Dean LLL 

Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas DeMasi 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Demeter 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip J. Demetri, Jared and Ashly 

Mr. and Mrs. Carlos C DeSanti 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. DeYoung 

Janet Dohoney 

Mr. and Mrs. John]. Donohoe and Family 

Jay and Susan Duffy 

Michael F. Dunn 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Egan 

Margo M. Estrada 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ettore 

Edward and Karen Findlen 

Philip and Carolyn Fitzgerald 

Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius J. Flynn, Jr. 

474- Silver Benefactors 



William and Roberta Frey 

Anthony and Susan Gabriele 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. D. Gady 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Gaetan 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis R. Gagne 

Captain and Mrs. George Galdorisi 

James and Miriam Gallacher 

Ellen M. Galligan 

Thomas J. Galligan LLL and Dr. Ann C Galligan 

Robert and Ann Geisel 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank T. Geiselman LLL 

Susan Gonda 

Charles and Sally Anne Goodale 

Antonio and Anna Guarino 

Robert and Cheryl Guernsey 

Mr. and Mrs. Eduardo Guerrero 

Mr. and Mrs. David A. Hallee 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell E. Hand 

Mamie Harper 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Thomas Harrick 

The Hartigan Family 

Kari and Sheila Hartmann 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Harvey 

William and Joan Hayevy 

Barbara and Ronald Heagle 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn R. Heywood 

Richard and Kathy Hughes, Class of '69 

Mr. and Mrs. David M. Hunter 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles N. Huntley 

Martha and Anthony Larrapino 

Pat and Don Lngoglia 

Robert and Alessandr a Jacques 

Tom and Louise Jones 

Diane Kahn 

Mary Ellen and Leon Kaplan 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Karahalios 

Mr. and Mrs. Kaoru Kato 

Doug and Kathy Kazacos 

Emit Keane 

Johann and Catherine Keil 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Kelly 

Mr. and Mrs. James King 

Albert and Gracijela Knapic 

Bill and Lynne Kutylo 

Davor Kvaternik 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Ladik, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Lanza 

Stephanie and Dean LeGras 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Levesque 

George and Lorraine Levesque 



Sever Benefac 



Dr. Joseph and Karen (Dickinson) Loeffler 

Jaime and Maureen Lopez 

Bill and Anne Lowery 

Mary Madigan 

Michael and Susan Maglione 

Fran and Jane Manzelli 

Jim and Jade Marshall 

Nicholas and Mary Martino 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Martire 

Beverly and John G. Mauver 

Laurie and Bill McCarthy 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. McCormack 

Thomas and Helen McDermott 

Dan and Mary McDonald, parents of Jennifer 

Betty and Jim McGuire 

Robert McKenna 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. McMahon 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. McMahon 

Dr. and Mrs. John Messitt 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas G. Miksis 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene A. Miller 

James Milloy 

Vladimir and Dagmar Misko 

Rosemary and Gary Montgomery 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Mullen 

Mrs. Susan E. Murphy-LaMarche 

Robert E. and Kathleen Murphy 

Charles and Susan Murray 

Mr. and Mrs. Y. Nazarian 

Pete and Nancy Newell 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Vo Van Ngo 

Peter E. Nictakis 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Nocella 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald F. Nugent 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard ' W. O'Connell 

Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence R. O 'Connor 

Mr. and Mrs. David S. O'Connor 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph O 'Keefe 

Gerald and Roseanne O 'Neill 

John and Nancy Ottoboni 

George and Helen Panagiotopoulos 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Patten 

Perez Family 

D 'Royce and Sue Peteson 

Kathleen Philbin 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Pinkham, Jr. 

Mrs. John K Quinlivan 

Dr. and Mrs. M. Joseph Ramirez 

John and Darlene Reid 

Juan R. Requena 



Kenneth William Richardson 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Riolo, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gary J. Rittel 

Robert and Carol Roden 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rodgerson 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Rost 

Edmond F. and Geraldine M. Ryan 

Mr. and Mrs. B. SantaMaria 

Sandra L. Saukas 
James H. and Carol A. Sbrolla 

Marie and Vern Schellenger 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert C. Schubert 

Hon. and Mrs. John R. Schwartz 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Scott 

Samir and Susan Shafei 

Jim and Ida Shea 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Simpson 

Thomas L. Simpson 
Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Skinner 

Charlie and Linda Sliva 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Spergl 

Philip and Barbara Squitieri 

George and Rita Stanis 

Bob Stucker 

Karen and Jack Stutz 

Chris and Matt Suffoletto 

Mary, John, and Brianne Sullivan 

Patrick and Pam Sullivan 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Taggart 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Tamulis 

Virendra V. Tanna 

Eileen and John Tegins 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan R. Tenney 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin R. Terry 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis C Thomas 

Peggy and Jerry Treglia 

George Kuang-Chao Tung 

David and Gina Vance 

Raymond and Barbara Vejack 

Susan and William Waas 

Vincent and Linda Walkowiak 

David J. and Mary-Ellen Welch 

Mr. and Mrs. John White II 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Dennis Withers 

Sue and Wayne Woltman 

Lorraine Wright 

Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth Wyneski 

Mr. and Mrs. Eduardo Yap 

Patt Young 

Mr. and Mrs. Anoar Zach arias 



Angela M. Zaro 



Silver Benefactors 475 



Patron Benefactors 



Roseanne Abruzzo 

The Ackerman Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Jose I. Aguirre 

Mr. and Mrs. Virgilio Alon 

Miriam Amatrucola 

The Amore Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Angelone 

Skip and Peggy Annett 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester R. Babst 

Dr. and Mrs. Abraham V. Bacarra 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Stephen Baine 

Ann Malia Elizabeth Baldelli 

Deborah Baldyga 

Harry and Tina Ball 

Mr. and Mrs. C Bannerman 

Andrew and Deana Barna 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Kenneth Barnett 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Barrell 

Larry and Patricia Bender 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Bentley 

John and Margaret Biggane 

Frank and Janice Bingham 

Steve and Diane Birkeland 

William C. Blackmer, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Blanco, Jr. 

Helen and Joseph Boland 

Margaret and Ron Bose 

Joseph and Maureen Brotherton 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Joseph Brune, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip J. Buffa 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald J. Buttarazzi 

Peter Byrne 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Calabrese 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Camacho 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Capobianco, III 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Capuana 

Thomas and Deborah Carpenter 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Carroll 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Carroll 

Dr. and Mrs. Jeffrey B. Carter 

Mr. and Mrs. William Catania 

Cordelia Chamberlin 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Thomas Church, Jr. 

Pat and Jack Close 

Joe and Maria Coccaro 

Jack and Cheryl Colbert 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond F. Collins 

Charles R. Conant III 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Connolly, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Cooney 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Corazzini 

Fran and Judith Corbett 

Anthony and Diane Costa 

Barry and Sharon Covington 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Crisalli 

Nancy and Anthony Crosta 

Dr. Michael F. and Helen L. Curran 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas V. Curtin 

Jake and Gail Dailey 
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald D'Ambrosi 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Dane 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. David, Sr. 

Jorge and Diana de la Torriente 

George and Lillian Dearden 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Defonte 

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Degan 

Mr. and Mrs. Domenic J. Dell'Osso, Sr. 

Dennis and Sue Denoncourt 

Bob and Emily DeSantis 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. DeSantis 

Mahasen and Eileen DeSilva 

Clare and Peter DiBiasie 

Frank and Julia DiMaio 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph DiTalia 

Stephen and Ann Marie Dlott 

Dennis and Lenora Doble 

Frederick and Eileen Doherty 

Frances Newman Dolch 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul Dollard 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward G. Dombrowski 

Michael and Erna Donahue 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Downey 

Dominick and Aurora Driano 

Rev. and Mrs. James Dutko 

Frank and Patricia Elliott 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Esposito 

Bill and Carol Evans 

Mr. and Mrs. E. V. Faber 

Nancy and Alan Fankhanel 

Mr. and Mrs. Jean A. Fattal 

John and Elizabeth Fenton 

Mr. and Mrs. Domingo Fernandez 

Mary M. Finn 

Anthony W. Fitzgerald 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Fitzgerald 

Dr. and Mrs. Edward Fitzpatrick 

Mr. and Mrs. Ken Foley 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Foody 



476 Tatron Benefactors 



Patron Benefactors 



The Fote Family 

Henry and Myrna Fourcade 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. M. Freyvogel, Jr. 

August J. and Catherine A. Furio 

Michael and Janie Galbreath 

Mr. and Mrs. Craig L. Gallagher 

Tony Gallardo 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Gargiulo, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Garnjost 

Patricia Garrahan 

Rachel and Robert Gaudiosi 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Gaviglia 

Paul and Patricia Gazso 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gentile 

Thomas and Jewel Geoppinger 

James and Victoria Gerchow 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Gibson 

James and JoAnn Giesen 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Giordano 

Lawrence L. Gipson, M.D. 

Yvonne E. Gipson 

Henry and Nora Glover 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Gobeil 

Karen and Tom Godfrey 

Paul and Eleanor Gorski 

David and Rhetta Greenman 

Alan L. and Donna A. Grenier 

Vincent and Veronica Grippo 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Guarrera 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Guilfoyle, Jr. 

Louise L. Guldner 

Vincent and Lucy Gullo 

Dr. Anand and Carmelita Gupta 

Ron and Mary-Jane Haddad 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hafner 

Richard and Lucille Halgin 

James and Judith Hamilton 

Mrs. Marilyn Hamlin 

John and Carol Haney 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest R. Haug 

Mr. and Mrs. Gene Heaney 

John and Anne Hedstrom 

Barbara and Mark Helms 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Herlihy 

Dan and Dorrie Hess 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Higgins 

Mary and Henry Hogan 

John and Judi Housman 

Doreen Hudson 



Ed Hughes and Kathryn Padovano 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Hughes 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Jackman 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Jespersen 

Mark and Sharon Johnson 

Thomas and Carol Johnson 

Patricia F. Jordan 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Julianelle 

Mr. and Mrs. Steven Kaden 

Jane and John Kahl 

Mr. and Mrs. Agop Kapitanyan 

Mr. and Mrs. Vicken and Maral Karakashian 

Thomas and Catherine Kavanagh 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Daniel Keefe 

Mr. and Mrs. John and Catherine Kelly 

Maureen and John Kelly 

Oliver and Felicity Kelly 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard F. Kelly 

Thorn and Sue Kelly 

Mr. and Mrs. K. Thomas Kemp 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Hasham Ali Khan 

Becki and Joel Klenert 

Andy Koch 

Mr. and Mrs. Dwayne Koget 

Henry and Beth Kopeck 

Paul and Cynthia Kosciak 

Bernard and Saundra Krieger 

Roland and Phyllis LaFerriere 

Barbara Lambropoulos 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Lane 

Stephen C. and Janet M. Lang 

Arthur and Dolores Langer 

Patrick G. Lenihan 

Stephen and Aveline Leslie 

Joan and Steve Lewis 

Hon. and Mrs. Paul D. Lewis 

Lucy and Michael Liberman 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Llewellyn 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Loftus 

Peggy Lombardo 

Antoinette Lordo 

Jane and Nick Loudon 

Lucy Lourenco 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Lowe 

John and Kathleen Lussen 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Lynch 

Janice and George Lyons 

Andrew and Eileen MacAvoy 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter MacConnell 



Tatron Benefactors 477 



Patron Benefactors 



Mr. and Mrs. Anthony M. MacLeod 
Rick and Maureen Madden 

Paul and Susan Maguire 
Patrick and Anne Mahoney 
Salvatore and Julie Mancini 

The Mangin Family 

Marc and Margaret Mann 

Anthony R. Marciano, Sr. 

John and Jacqueline Martell 

Christine Martin 

Mr. and Mrs. James M. Martin 

Paul and Gail Martin 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Masterman 

James and Jacqueline Mathias 

Robert G. and Mary C. McAndrew 

Mr. and Mrs. Alec J. McAuley 

Mary T. McCaffrey 

Judge and Mrs. J. R. McClean 

Dr. and Mrs. A. Scott McGowan 

Austin and Darlyne McKeand 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Bruce McLane 

John and Kathy McSweeney 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Christophe Megroz 

Eileen and Douglas Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael W. Mills 

Bill and Linda Moitz 

Joseph and Carolyn Mooney 

Cliff and Phyllis Moore 

Pat and Mary Beth Moorhead 

Ambassador Rafael A. Leon Morales 

William and Lorraine Morlok 

Dorothy and Peter Morris 

Thorn and Linda Morrissey 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas H. Mundy 

Roger and Lillian Mustone 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Nehill 

Craig and Barbara Nelson 



Richard and Catherine Neri 

Thomas and Rita Newman 

Chung Nguyen and Tieng Isui 

Larry Ni 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. O'Brien 
Mr. and Mrs. William O'Connor 

Mrs. Bernard J. O'Donnell 

James T. and Marie L. O'Donnell 

Bill and Nancy O'Halloran 

John and Patti O'Keefe 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Olivier 

Dr. and Mrs. William O'Neill 

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick J. O'Sullivan, Sr. 

Sumant and Snehlata Pandya 

Joseph and Linda Parmakian 

Stan and Rosemary Patten 

Theodore J. Pawlik 

Joanne Pellegrino, Esq. 

John and Kathy Peltonen 

Mr. and Mrs. James Phelan 

Jean Pietrasiewicz 

Neil, Ellen, Carrie ~ BA '98, Kate - MA '98 Pinkman 

The Pisano Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Poopor 

Charles and Mary Presto 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Provey 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Quaile 

Kevin T. Quinn 

John and Judy Rando 

Colleen Raymond 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Murray Regan 

Michael and Betty-Jean Regan 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Repik 

George F. Rice 

John and Sandra Rizzo 

Dr. and Mrs. Ferdinand Rodriguez 

Dr. and Mrs. Stanley J. Roe 



478 Vanon Benefactors 



Patron Benefactors 



Edward Roman 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis E. Rose 

Mr. and Mrs. Lowell Ross 

Gerald and Ann Rourke 

Harry and Jessica Ruda 

Rita and Steve Ryder 

Kwesi and Eugenia-Marie Sackey 

Gary and Susan Saltsgiver 

Jeanne L. Sanchez 

Eleni Saranteas 

Mark and Linda Saxon 

Allen and Joan Schiefelbein 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Schmidt 

John and Jan Schuster 

Dr. and Mrs. G. Philip Scott 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip J. Seereiter, Sr. 

Elizabeth Seligher 

The Shackell Family 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Shea 

Mom and Dad Skeie 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Skoczelas 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Raymond Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Snyder, Jr. 

Lydia and Sam Sobhi 

The Sorokolit Family 

George and Vera Sova 

Robert Fintan Stapleton 

Gordon F. Stevens 

Mr. and Mrs. James Stonick 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel E. Straffi 

Dr. and Mrs. Timothy Sullivan 

Janet Sullivan 

Lew and Chris Suskiewicz 

David and Linda Tafuto 

Fernando Tamayo 

Robert and Noriko Tanigawa 

Jim and Jann Tapper 



Mr. and Mrs. Michael Taylor 

Claude and Bertina Thau 

David and Frances Thomas 

Joe and Joan Thomas 

Mr. and Mrs. E. James Thompson 

Ron and Kathy Thompson 

Joan and John Tomaszewski 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Traficanti 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Trapani 

William Turchyn 

Mr. and Mrs. John Turick, Jr. 

David P. Twomey 

Dr. Triveni Upadhyay and Sadhara Misya Upadhyay 

Bob and Julie Utzler 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas P. Vaglio 

Cam and Ann Vandermaelen 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Vannelli 

Mr. and Mrs. Luigi Vetrini 

Joaquim Viana 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Vince 

Maryanne Violette 

Robert and Lucille Vital 

George and Dorothy Voris 

Richard and Barbara Weinand 

Elaine and Mike Weir 

Alan and Susan Weiss 

Mr. and Mrs. George D. Brown, Professor of Law 

Alan and Josie Wells 

Dr. and Mrs. David C. Wharton 

Mary Rose and Jeff Williams 

Michael and Elizabeth Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. Dale A. Wilson 

David and Nancy Wise 

Atty. William and Prof. Christine Wiseman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wolthausen 

Arlene and Vernon Woo 

Dave and Bonnie Yocum 

Mr. Bert and Mrs. Cecilia Zaldivar 



Tatron Benefactors 479 



I Congratulations, Class of 1998! I 



Business Communication Center, Inc. 

Offset Printing • Typesetting • Business Forms 

Stationery • Desktop Publishing 

Banners & Signs • Mailing • Bindery 

Graphic Design • Invitations • and much more! 



You'll find us in Boston at 

The Prudential Tower Lower Lobby 

(617) 262-3920 




and in Chestnut Hill at BC Press 
B-59 Higgins Hall, Boston College 
(617)552-3418/3419 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 

from the 

Wallace E. Carroll School of Management 

Faculty and Staff 




rfS^wjj^^*,^' Zm£-*^ <*&■&- ' 



FULTON ,HALL 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



480 Advertisements 



From the 
BOSTON COLLEGE CAREER CENTER 

BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1998! 

Career Center services are always 
available to you as alumni. 

• Career Advisory Network 

• Current Job Listings 

• Career Resource Library 

• Job Search Workshops/Career Programs 

• Individual Appointments 

• Evening Hours on Tuesdays and Wednesdays 
during the academic year 

• Visit out homepage anytime at 
http://careercenter.bc.edu 



The Flower Market 

At the Star Market 



BEVERLY GOLDEN 
Manager/Designer 



1 BOYLSTON ST. 

CHESTNUT HILL, MA 02167 

(617) 738-5927 






„ ™ii[iii i i i ni 

Collegiate Publishing Co. 

2815 Day Avenue 

Miami, FL 33133 



BEST WISHES TO 
THE CLASS OF 1998 FROM 
THE EAGLE'S VIE W BOOK 




THE OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY HOUSING 

thanks and congratulates all members of the Resident Staff, especially those in the 

Class of 1 998 
Your service, dedication, and loyalty to Boston College sets new standards of 

excellence 



Robert F. Capalbo, Ph.D. 

Director of University Housing 



Linda J. Riley 

Associate Director 
Operations/ Financial Management 



Robert O. Jose 

Associate Director 
Residential Life 

Advertisements 481 



Carl Wolf Studio, Inc. 

The Official YearbookPhotographer 

of Boston College 



Congratulations 

and Best ofCuck 

to the Boston College 

Class of 1998 



401 Elmwood Avenue 

RO. Box 1037 
Sharon Hills, PA 19079 



1-800-969-1337 



482 Advertisements 




Congratulations and Good Luck to 

1998 Heights, Inc. senior staff 

and the rest of the Class of 1998! 

Subscriptions to the Heights, inc. are available @ $55 per year, $95 per 2yrs. 

Please mail Subscriptions to: 

Boston College, McElroy 113 

Chestnut Hill, MA, 02167 

Attn.: Subscriptions 



Jostens, Inc. 

"Would like to Congratulate the 
Cvaduating Seniors from Sub Turri 19981 

Kerry Giroin Pimy Kissane ((ate Johnson Jyoti Mahapatra 
Beo Mather f)my Snyder Elena Oizoary 



Rachel Cohen 


Kisha f/ess 


Chris Miller 


Kevin Fleck 


Jim Gruher 


(sbendy Prygoda 


Pete Qerken 


Lais Mates 


Mark Samale 



Arnie CoKmann- Sales Representative 

Rristen Ellerbe- Customer Service Representative, ^Winston-Salem, J\IC 

Rick Brookes- Creative Arts Design Consultant 

Vrinted in ~Winston-Salem. 7S/C 



Advertisements 483 




"^ s we built and fine tuned this book, we held onto the goal 
ysx. of creating something that will memorialize The Heights 
forever in the hearts of the Senior Class of 1998. In naming the 
yearbook Inner Reflections, we sought to build a keepsake that 
reveals the soul of our university, rather than simply its external 
appearance. Our hope is that we have captured the spirit oj 
Boston College that you have all come to know andlove. If when 
you look at this book, you feel what this place and all the people 
in it have become to you, than we have met our challenge. Good 
luck to the Class of 1998, and always cherish your memories. 



484 Thank You 



The Staff of Sub Turn Would Like To Thank: 

Mike Durinzzi and everyone else at Carl Wolf Studios - 

For coming through for us every time we needed you, and for always having the answer to our constant questions. 
Thank You especially for going far beyond the call of duty when our pictures were stolen. 

Arnie Lohmann - 

You have always been much more than a Sales Representative to us - you have been a friend. 
Congratulations again on your new Grandson! 

Kristen Ellerbe and everyone else atjostens - 

For patiently answering all of our impatient, and usually strange, questions. Your never-ending dedication to the 
quality of our book has been a motivation. 

Rick Brooks - 

For once again designing a cover and dividers that made our dreams a reality. 

Mer Zovko - 

For stepping into the role of our ODSD moderator blind, yet with such care and attention. With all the trying 
issues of the year, your presence has been a comfort to all of us. 

Father Joseph O'Keefe, S.J. - 

For another year as our supportive advisor. 

Tony and the rest of the Carl Wolf Photographers - 

For spending more time here than with your families, making sure that as many of the 2,253 seniors as possible 
got their pictures taken as many times as they wanted to. Also, for your car - we still haven't gotten the bill from 
Prudential. 

The Heights - 

For your staff, pictures, and supplies. We honestly could not have done it without you. 

James Burns - 

For the incredible picture of the Boston College Class of 1898. 

Jon Schwartz- 

For the Shel Silverstein inspiration. 

The Deans, Faculty, Staff, Parents, and Alumni - 

For all of your help, support, and contributions throughout the year. We hope we have given you a final product 
hat you can be proud of. 

Thank You 485 



Behind The Scenes 




Pit 



486 Sub Turri Staff 



Sab 




#i 



am 




Sub Turn Staff 4-87 



Elena I. lizvarj 
Assistant Sports Photo Editor: 

Melissa Cod] 
Assistant Activities Photo Editor: 



|Hfi||||»JtiJll 



1 



this book wouldn't have been possible without the dedica- 

! '™' M4!t,B!l ' M J]llIlIj|Mi|^Br/t7/7 of a wonderful photo staff, thank you and we love 
fBMlfflJ^H You all! we'd also like to thank mike durinzi for his re- 
HI^^BhI^B lentless speedy deliveries and the yearbook staff and 
^B^Meditors for their patience and persistence. 
iiiiiiiBfn . love, elena and kerry 

IHllillilfl! 
|||Mllillii«I^iiiHilliflliiW!l1fil»iTMiiffli;ffW!ili 
'"''■^BBBltlLUIlllliliMiMMllHMililililtt.liLlli 

||||^ ||tlMfiilijii 



JJiilfjIjlJjlfljRl 

IT 



■1 



That's the waj we became... 




n r 



...tlie Photo Bunch. 



490 Vhoto Staff 



Lori Lefevre, 
Academics Editor 



Aca demics r Edit or 

A Reporter's Life 



Staff: CarraBethConstantine, 
Kevin Fleck, Amy Kaufold, 
Chris Miller, Wendy Prygoda, 
Jennifer Raterman 




"I'll get alt the sleep I need when I'm dead." 




Ironic that my year with Sub Turri should end with a zany 
campus search with the two people who introduced me to it. 
The adventure began a year ago with a trip to see my roommate's 
yearbook proofs. Next thing I knew, I had a section — Academics, 
and a new activity to fill my time. But I thought "Hey, this will be 
easy." Oh, the surprise I was in for. The life lesson: never 
underestimate the amount of time it takes to do your best work 
(And, never let your 
roommate show you her 
pages, just wait for the 
book.) 

Thank you to the 
deans for their letters, to 
the Perspective faculty 
for their time, and to 
Kathleen Bailey for her 
help. I would also like 
to thank my staff. 
Thank you to the photo 
editors for making the 
section possible. Thank 
you to the editors, 

especially Bev and Sam for making my section look great (and for 
tolerating my spelling!). And a special thank you to my other 
family: The Heights. Thank you for walking down the hall to ask 
me questions, for letting my run to check on photos, for helping out 
during deadlines. You helped make the busiest months of my life 
better through understanding and caring. Now I'm all yours. 

To my roommates and honorary roommates, best of luck next 
year. Youwillalldoagreatjobinwhateveryoudo. You're destined 
for greatness. I'll be the one lost without each of you. We'll always 
have Michael (tell me again what we were doing), dinners with the 
six of us, the football games, late night talks and plenty of laughs. 
Thanks for the year of smiles and continued support. Don't forget 
to "Heal the World." 

And in the end, Kerry and Jyoti, there we were — climbing 
chairs, dodging avalanches, and opening doors. I wouldn't have 
wanted to end any other way (regardless of whether I had two hours 
sleep or not) . There we stood with the year behind us on top of our 
world. Thank you for opening that door for me. 




JVLy roommates Bridge, Jyoti, and 
Lynn — you were ever entering, 
supportive, and the greatest distraction 
I could have asked for after the long 
hours. 



Jn top of a table in Bapst Libray, I ended on only two hours worth of sleep. 



JVLy other roommates, you are my 
other world, The Heights. Thanks for 
always understanding, andwhe 
didn't, thanks for offering to learn or 
help. Want to crop again, Kev? 



Cori 491 



2050 



life'; 

, between . 




CUMBIES!!!Imissyou.I 
wouldn't be where I am 
today withoutyou all!! 



BJ: the memories are endless, and there 

are more and more everyday. Let's see 

the world together. Cereal, movies, 

shopping, baseball, basketball, lifting - 
being with you makes even the most 

normal things so muchy«w. I love you. 



Mrs. B & 
Brooke: 
Thanks for 
putting up 
with me! 
Much love. 



To my roommates; Pam, Julie, (Devon) & Judith: 

You guys are wonderful. I'm going to miss you so 

much next year. But, maybe we'll hang out more!! = 

Thanks for putting up with me, and supporting me. 

And AP, RA, TG, JM, NC, TF, EE, AD, JG, RD, 

BK & SC - thank you. I love you guys! 




JSPcg^ Brandon, 


1 






What's the 


1 






best way to 
relax? 






MOVIES!!! 





I love 

you, 




UureH/nv. pmtd& 




Eileen P., Dr. Rumble, 
& Professor Mostefai: 

You have made my 
contribution to BC so 
much more than I ever 
dreamed it could have 

been. Thank you so 
much, for your support 
and for believing in me! 



"Doubt thou 

the flames are 

fire, doubt 

that the sun 

doth move, 

doubt truth to 

be a liar, but 

never doubt I 

love." 
-Shakespeare 







Brandon, I will 
be your friend, 
your fan, your 
love, and no 
matter what we 
go through, I will 
always love you. 

We've dealt with so much, and you 
know, 'what does not kill us makes us 
stronger'. My life would not nearly be 
the same without you. Thanks for 
being there for me, and helping me to 
grow and change. I love (wuv) you. 



S'A/J* 



To my family; Pringle's & Murphy's: You have always been behind 
everything that I do. Jane, for your unconditional support; Lisa, for 
your inspiration; Dornae, for your love, and Steve, Matt, Shiela, 
Robbie, Dana, Sharon, and all the outlaws: you are the best family I 
could ever have. I love you all dearly. Thanks for being so amazing. 




Sam, Dani & Dan, 
Kim & Lori: I'm 
can't wait for the 
next two years! 
Thanks for every- 
thing thus far & in 
the future! 





Bev, Risha, Kerry, Elena, 

Amy, Kate, Jyoti & Amy S.: 

Reach for the stars. 

You are all amazing, and I 

wish you the best in 

whatever you choose to do. 

But don't be strangers! 




B.J., this could be me! 

AHHHH!DUCK!!! 

Hey, at least you're a 

raz/player! =) 




You're the best personal 

trainer I could ever have, but: 

SLOWDOWN! =) 



Mom, You are always with 

me. I love and miss you. 

Thank you for making me 

who I am today, and for 

showing me what true 

happiness really is. Simplify. 



Student Life 

As I sit here and reflect on my past four years at Boston 
College, I am in awe of all the happy times, great memories, and 
fabulous experiences that have come my way. As a freshman in the 
fall of 1994, It seemed as if 1998 would never come, lean remember 
my father telling me on that September afternoon, "Amy, today 
you're crying because we're leaving you here all alone. ..but before you 
know it, you'll be crying because you have to leave." As usual, he 
couldn't have been any more right. 

I value all my experiences and I believe that working on the 
yearbook has been a truly rewarding endeavor. I would like to thank 
the entire Sub Turri staff for their dedication and congratulate 
them on a job well done (we did it!). Thanks to the Student Life staff 
for writing articles and helping out with pictures. Best wishes to 
Amy, Kate, F3ev, Jyoti, Kerry, and Elena. Good luck nextyearto Sam, 
Lauren, Danl, and Lori. Thank you all for your patience and for 
sharing your many talents. 

I would also like to thank my family for helping make me the 
person I am today. All of you have helped me turn my dreams Into 
realities. Dad - your guidance, support, and generous heart has 
meant more to me than you will ever know. You taught me :to go after 
what I want and to never let go of my dreams. Mom - In my eyes, you 
are the world's best teacher. I love you for all the sacrifices you've 
made for me and I want to thank you for always being there for me 
when I needed a hug. Dan -17years ago I was ecstatic to have a baby 
brother... and I still am. You are the best!! You've taught me about 
dedication and you'll always be my favorite hockey player. Kate -you 
made our family complete. Your undying love and kind spirit have 
showed me that what an exceptional person you are. Don't ever 
forget that I love you and that sisters have a special bond -always. 

Last, but not least, I would like to thank all my friends. I ask 
that you treasure all our memories and remember all the great 
times we've had. To my roommates: Alicia, Toni, Ada, Mary, Jenn, 
(and Lisa): I leave D-22/F3.I.T. , parties, Notre Dame, Spring break 
trips, and countless late night talks and pranks. It is virtually 
impossible to cram four years onto one yearbook page. The list 
could go on and on, but I want to thank you all for making my F3C 
years the best four years of my life!! Here's to many more crazy 
yearsahead. Also,toall my friends back home in lovelyupstate New 
York, I miss you all and you guys better come visit me! 

To anyone who is still reading this, please understand that 
the Student Life section is more than a bunch of pages. It is 
representative of many countless hours of hard work and late 
nights. I did my best to portray this school in a way that students 
would want to see it and I hope you enjoy the pictures and the 
stories for years to come. 




Amy L. Snyder 

Editor - CSOM '98 



Elena K. Vizvary 





Thanks Mom and Pad. Love you!! 




Great friends explori 
Boston and having a 



The Snyder siblings spending 
some quality time at F3C. Love ya! 



Amy 491 



SportsEditor 



Well , this is it. Every year I said 
I wouldn 't come back, and every fall I 
returned. After freshman year, Igness 
I couldn '/ handle the thought of a 
yearbook being produced without 
getting to help. Four years later I can 
proudly say that apart of me is in every 
yearbook made while I was at BC. 

After feeling honored, sometimes I 
felt like a sucker. For chasing down 
students, photographers, and coaches. 
For putting up with the dungeon of 
McElroy and Wing-It. But when it 
was over, all I could remember was 
how fun the whole experience had been 
and what a beautiful piece of work 
Sub Turri had created. 

I have never worked so hard or 
with so much commitment on 
anything. I owe Sub Tarn for the 
opportunity it gave me to become this 
involved at Boston College. 

My gratitude extends to everyone 
else on staff who gave time that they 
didn 't have. I hope you all experienced 
as much satisfaction and insanity that 
I did. To those of you who will return 
next year: 

Don't let your final moments at this 
great school slip through your fingers. 
Take pictures o f everything . Besides, 
they could come in handy during a 
deadline crunch. 



Jyoti ^Mahapatra 





Bev, Kerry, Elena, Amy S., Kate, 
and Amy K; its been a blast bonding 
with all of you in this crazy office, a 
hope this isn't the last we see of each 
other. Go Class of 1998! 

Sam, Dani, Melissa, and Lauren., 
its all up to you guys now! Sub Turr. 
will be left in great hands, lean 't wai, 
to see next year's finished product. 
Seriously consider installing tht 
beverage fridge for your senior year. 
It might make deadlines a little mon 
bearable. 

Linnus, Bridge, BriGuy, Lori, 
Kevin, and Pete: Thanks so much foi 
the laughs and the friendship. BC 
wouldn 't have meant anything to mi 
without you. I will miss you lih 
crazy, don 't be a stranger to Nebraska. 
Huskers rule! 

Ron, Iknowyou have been waiting 
for my graduation since sophomort 
year. We can finally begin what wt 
have wanted for three years. I havt 
loved every moment that we've shared 
here, you were the best thing to happen 
to me in college, xoxo 

Mom, Baba, Suraj, and Ravi— 
Your (hopefully) wiser daughter ana 
sister will return home believing in 
herself andBG. Thanks for giving mi 
the chance to prove myself. Hove you 
all. 

Staff 
Tete Gerken 



JCevin fleck 
Sarah Stiglemeir 



H Ivoti 



Jim Gruber 

u Q£is is i£e time to remem£er Maureen Tor ^ 

'Cause it wiff not fast forever Courtney Cappa 

Unese are tne oaas to now on to Mark Cautela 

1 Cause we won % aMougliwe ^{f want to. " l ackle Felice 




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To think I am finally graduating.. .what a scary 
thought Thanks to everyone who helped make 
it possible. I couldn't have asked for a better 
group of friends to spend these four years with. 
The memories will forever remain with me. 
Dad, Mom, Kate, Jim, Chris, Meg and Samantha 
thanks for being the best family ever! I love you 
all! Bev, Sam, Andy and the Sub-Turri staff what 
would we have done without you! Kate, all I 
have to say is that if we are still friends after 
this then we will remain friends for a lifetime! 
You're the greatest! Congratulations to the 
Class of '98! 



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Four of the best years of my life have been shared 
with you, my classmates, peers, and friends here at 
Boston College. . . .seniors, this is for you! These 
years have been made especially memorable 
thanks to my awesome roommates. You guys are 
the best! Amy, my co-editor, roommate, and dear 
friend, grab another Diet Coke 'cause it's 
Groundhog's Day! Thanks for keeping me sane. 
Speaking of keeping me sane. . .Rich-thanks for 
being everything I'm not. A huge thank you to my 
family, for your constant love and support. Let me 
not forget Bev, Sam, Andy and the rest of the Sub 
Turri staff for all your help. Best of luck to the 
Class of '98! 



'o ° oo 







o 
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Amy &Xate495 



^nsiness y^Xana^t fr ^perspectives £Aitor 

Interviewing the candidates for the Perspectives section was, for me, one of the highlights of fall semester. 
Granted, I'm impressed pretty easily, but these students rose above and far beyond any expectations I'd had foi 
people nominated for this section. I was astounded not only by what they'd accomplished here at school, but 
with their personalities, as well. They were genuine, caring, funny, relaxed and charismatic students who 
happily put up with my endless stream of questions—a feat in itself! Given that, I must thank all the seniors 
who trekked up to my room for interviews during finals week— I loved hearing about your lives and the 
experiences that have made you the people you are today. Although your modesty sometimes made asking for 
your accomplishments like pulling teeth, you shared more of yourself than some people do in a year, and I'm 
grateful for your contribution to this book! I'd also like to thank everyone who nominated a student, for without 
them, these special people couldn't have been highlighted. 

To Kerry and Elena— your photos were absolutely amazing. I know I've told you many times how much 
I admire your talents, but it's worth repeating! I can't imagine Sub Turri without your photographic genius. 
I wish you both good luck and I'll miss you next year! 

To all my roommates— thanks for putting up with the order forms spread out all over the floor for 
alphabetizing needs, the stream of seniors through our room during finals, labels and envelopes and letters and 
labels and labels and envelopes, and... well, me! Katie, thanks for reading and for all your help brainstorming 
for Perspectives... here's to yet another year of post-midnight ramblings! 

Bev, Sam, and everyone else on the staff, thanks to you ALSO for... well, everything! You've all done a 
wonderful job with the book. It was fun working with you guys this year, and to all you seniors, GOOD 
LUCK!!! Grace, thank you for all your help with money issues, and to Deans Michael Ryan and Mer Zovko, 
I appreciate all your help with administrative matters. ~T)(Mii/' 




496 TDani 



Samantha M. Steel 

Managing Editor 



"My Creed is that: 

Happiness is the only good 

c Ihe place to be happy is here 

The time to be happy is now 

The way to be happy is to make 

others so." 

- Egbert Q. Ingersoll 




Wow, I can't believe we are FINALLY done. It seems as though I have been working on this book 
my entire life, but it was worth it. I am so proud of what we accomplished this year and I look 
forward to continuing the success we have had next year. Everyone who contributed to making 
this book what it is deserves a HUGE thank- you. 

Bev - You have taught me so much I don't even know the words to express how grateful I am. 
There were some CRAZY and STRESSFUL times but we got through each one ( and I'm not quite 
sure how). Even though we encountered some problems in the end we produced a great yearbook. 
I will miss you next year and wish you all the luck in the world with Andy and your future together. 
Kerry & Elena -- Once again you out did yourselves. Your creativity and talent never ceases to 
amaze me. Thank you for EVERYTHING! 

Amy, Kate, Jyoti & Amy -- Your sections were wonderful and I had so much fun working with each 
one of you. Good luck and may all your goals be reached and your dreams come true. 
Lauren, Lori & Dani - One year down and one to go! We have a tough act to follow next year but 
I believe we can do it. Thank you for all you did this year and I can't wait to get started again( after 
a nice, long break). 

"9{p (ove, no friendship can cross the path of our destiny 
zuithout (eaving some maroon it forever" - Francois Mauriac 

Brian - You have changed my life in so many ways and I can't begin to tell you how much you mean 

to me. You make my heart flutter everyday. 1-4-3 always and forever! 

Jessica -- Our friendship and the memories we have together are one of the most important things 

in my life. Thank you for being my best friend and my other half. 

Mom, Dad, Megan, Nanny & Pop-Pop -- This year has taught me how much you all mean to me. 

Now you can all see what I have spent so much time talking about. I love you all! 



Samantha 497 



Bev Mather 
Editor-in-Chief 

I imagine that every Senior in college stops at some point and 
takes a look back at their four years of college and the people who 
made it an experience they could never forget. I do not think 
many are as lucky as I am in that I have the opportunity to create 
a public record of my Thank You's to the people who have done 
this for me . 



Mom, Dad, Mel, and David * This year, for the first time, I truly 
realized all that you gave given me and taught me. You have 
supported me every step of the way. I am honored to have such a 
family. I love you all very much. 

Andy - I am still amazed by the fact that we found each other. You 
can only imagine how happy I am that some random man, who works 
for a foundation no one has ever heard of, liked my presentation. 
Je t'amoure. 

Sam r- I could not have asked for a better person to do this with. 
Thank You for everything and Good Luck next year! But, please 
don't tell me if Jostens decides to let you skip the print-outs when you 
submit deadlines. 

Kerry - Wow. You are an amazing photographer, woman, and 
friend. I can not possibly thank you enough or actually list all the 
wonderful times we've had. I'll see you in October! 

Amy K. & Kate ~ You two are unstoppable. It was rough, but I will 
always remember the laughter you ladies gave us from morning to 
night for a week straight. 

AmyS., Elena, &Jyoti^ We have had an interesting four years haven't 
we? Hopefully none of us have any permanent damage from the sun 
deprivation. Thank You for all of your dedication and hard work. 





Dani - You have been an incredible comfort to me this year. I'nr 
so glad you were able to do more than just the business. I hope yon 
had fun doing it. 

Lori ~ I thought you were insane for taking this on at the same timn 
as The Heights. You proved me wrong and did an amazing jobl 
Have a great time next year and try to get some sleep! 

Lauren ^ You are currently our sole member of the 2000 editoria. 
board. Don't worry, if you made it through the ice storm and all 
those late nights with Sam and me, you can make it through 
anything. 

Colleen &Jen ~ This year has been so much fun. I admire you both 
for your incredible dedication to holding close the things you believe 
in and to reaching the goals you set. 

Risha - 1 wish we had found each other four years ago. I have enjoyec 
every minute of living with you. I hope this is just the beginning 
of our friendship. 

Red- We have seen each other through the craziest, hardest 
and most wonderful times of our lives. Here's to all thf 
times we haven't had yet. 

Kelley ~ You are my oldest and dearest friend. I guess a true 
strong friendship will survive no matter what the world 
throws at you. You and I combined make the perfecu 
woman and I would not trade that for the world. 

The 1A Men, the 40A Women, and the Voute Women - You 
are the reason that I was not sucked into this office, neve* 
to be heard from again. Your friendship has given me more 
and taught me more throughout these four years than 
anything else at BC. Always hold onto the fun we had - from 
Keyes to the Mods - I love you all. 



498 Bev 



coamiON 



The 1998 edition of Sub Turri, the 
Yearbook of Boston College, was 
printed by the School Products 
Division of Jostens, Inc. in 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 
The 86th Volume, consisting of 
500 pages, had a press run of 2, 1 00 
copies and was printed from March 
28- April 1 , 1 998 at the Winston- 
Salem plant. 

COVER: The cover, endsheets, and 
dividers were designed by Rick 
Brooks of the Creative Arts 
Division of Jostens, State College, 
PA. All theme and cover ideas were 
the product of the Editorial Board, 
Rick's talent, and inspired by the 
view out of the Gasson Bell Tower. 
The cover is Maroon #490. The 
Tipon has a 2 pica border of Curtis 
Flannel B printed in duotoned PMS 
#160. The photo is printed in 
Duotone Rust. All text is embossed 
and in Rich Gold. 
PAPER: Pages were printed using 
100% black ink with pages 1-16 
on 1001b. gloss paper and pages 
17-500 on gloss stock 80lb. paper. 
The endsheets are Cottonwood 
paper with the Boston College 
Whispertone seal embossed on it. 
Warm gray #403 is applied to the 
! print. The Opening, pages 1-15 
were printed using Matte Black 
iink with a matte varnish and a 
Iglossy varnish on the photos. 
iPantone inks and dyes were used 
[for spot color throughout the book 
[at the discretion of the section 
[editors. 85-90% of these 500 pages 
[were proofed out by the Editors 
within the span of one week. 
DESIGN: All theme related copy 
pnd designs, including the Opening 
land the Dividers, were created by 
jthe Executive Board. All sections 
[were designed and created by their 
[respective section editor. All pages 
[were created on the Power Mac 
"7600, Quadra 660AV, and two 




Power Mac 6500/300 using Aldus PageMaker 6.5 and Jostens' Yeartech 
Templates. The pages were printed by our Hewlett Packard 4MV Laser 
Jet Printer. 

PHOTOGRAPHY: Senior portraits were taken by Carl Wolf Studios, 
Inc., 401 Elmwood Avenue, Sharon Hills, PA 19079. Phone: 1-800- 
969- 1 337 or 1 338. Carl Wolf Studios was contracted by Boston College 
to be the Official Yearbook Photographer for the 1998 Sub Turri. 
Current Events photos were purchased through World Wide Photo, 
New York City. All other photos were taken by the Sub Turri photography 
staff, the occasional section editor, and even their significant others, 
under the direction of the photography editors. Any other photos were 
graciously submitted by students or a variety of University departments. 
All color photos were submitted on Fuji transparency film and speedily 
developed by Carl Wolf Studios and Boston Photo Imaging. Black and 
white photos were taken, developed, and printed by the loving photo 
staff using only the best Kodak T-Max and Ilford films and papers. The 
photos were taken using a variety of cameras and lenses manufactured by 
Nikon, Canon, Quantum, and Mamiya. 



TYPOGRAPHY: All Body Copy 
is 1 2pt. AGaramond, Captions are 
lOpt. AGaramond, Photo Credits 
are 6pt. AGaramond, and Folios 
are lOpt. Chaucer. The type used 
for the cover and endsheets is 
Goudy and Chaucer. The 
remaining fonts and sizes of all 
other types were determined by the 
section editors. 

Copyright, 1998, by Sub Turri, 
the Yearbook of Boston College. 
No portion of Sub Turri may be 
reproduced or transmitted in any 
form, electronic, mechanical, 
digital, or otherwise, without the 
expressed written consent of the 
current Editors-in-chief. Sub Turri 
was produced entirely by a staff of 
undergraduate student volunteers 
and receives no funding from the 
University or the Student Activities 
Fee. Sub Turri generates revenue 
from yearbook sales, ads, and 
donations. Please direct all inquiries 
to: Sub Turri, the Yearbook of 
Boston College, McElroy 
Commons, Room 103, Chestnut 
Hill, MA 02167. Phone: (617) 552- 
3493, Business: (617) 552-0898. 
E-Mail: subturri@bc.edu 



Colophon 4-99 



for Boston 



For Boston, For Boston, 
We sing our proud refrain! 

For Boston, For Boston, 
Tis Wisdom 's earthly fane. 



For here all are one 

And their hearts are true, 

And the towers on the Heights 

Reach to Heav 'n 's own blue. 

For Boston, For Boston, 

Til the echoes ring again! 



For Boston, For Boston, 

Thy glory is our own! 

For Boston, For Boston, 

Tis here that Truth is known. 



And ever with the Right 
Shall thy heirs be found, 
Til time shall be no more 

And thy work is crown 'd. 
For Boston, For Boston 

For Thee and Thine alone! 




Class of 1898 
Counesy of James Burns 



"Jiatll Alma Mater! 



Hail! Alma Mater! 

Thy praises we sing. 

Fondly thy mem 'ries 

round our heart still cling. 

Guide of your youth, 

thro ' thee we shall prevail! Hail! 

Alma Mater! 

Hail! All Hail! 



Hail! Alma Mater! 

Lo! on the height, 
Proudly thy tow'rs are 

raised for the Right. 

God is thy master, 
His Law thy sole avail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 
Hail! All Hail! 



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